Five-Minute Whodunits

Five-Minute Whodunits

5.0 1
by Stan Smith, Lucy Corvino
     
 
Accompany Thomas Stanwick as he hears about a crime, arrives on the scene, interviews the authorities and witnesses, examines the body, surveys the surroundings, and announces which suspect to arrest. All under 5 minutes. You'll be right there with him for dozens of different crime scenes, and if it takes you less than five minutes to bust the case open, consider

Overview

Accompany Thomas Stanwick as he hears about a crime, arrives on the scene, interviews the authorities and witnesses, examines the body, surveys the surroundings, and announces which suspect to arrest. All under 5 minutes. You'll be right there with him for dozens of different crime scenes, and if it takes you less than five minutes to bust the case open, consider yourself a match for the brilliant Stanwick. 96 pages, 40 b/w illus., 5 3/8 x 8 1/4.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Debra Briatico
How long does it take a person to hear about a crime, arrive on the scene, interview the authorities and witnesses, examine the body, survey the surroundings, and announce which suspect to arrest? According to the brilliant freelance writer and amateur logician, Thomas P. Stanwick, it usually takes about five minutes. Readers can accompany Stanwick to dozens of different crime scenes and see if they can solve the crime before he does. Readers will need to use their logic and other critical thinking skills to closely examine each whodunit and solve the crime in five minutes or less.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780806994024
Publisher:
Sterling
Publication date:
06/28/1997
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.18(h) x 0.43(d)

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Five-Minute Whodunits 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Debra Briatico How long does it take a person to hear about a crime, arrive on the scene, interview the authorities and witnesses, examine the body, survey the surroundings, and announce which suspect to arrest? According to the brilliant freelance writer and amateur logician, Thomas P. Stanwick, it usually takes about five minutes. Readers can accompany Stanwick to dozens of different crime scenes and see if they can solve the crime before he does. Readers will need to use their logic and other critical thinking skills to closely examine each whodunit and solve the crime in five minutes or less.