Fix [NOOK Book]

Overview

It hurts to be beautiful.

Pretty, blond, popular Cameron Beekman has it all -- lots of girlfriends, a hot boyfriend, and a successful family. She's perfection. Gone are her days as the outcast, huge-nosed "Beakface." Which, as it turns out, was nothing a good nose job couldn't fix.

While her little sister, Allie, struggles with doubts about her own approaching ...
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Fix

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Overview

It hurts to be beautiful.

Pretty, blond, popular Cameron Beekman has it all -- lots of girlfriends, a hot boyfriend, and a successful family. She's perfection. Gone are her days as the outcast, huge-nosed "Beakface." Which, as it turns out, was nothing a good nose job couldn't fix.

While her little sister, Allie, struggles with doubts about her own approaching "procedure," Cameron wants more. She's headed to UC "Santa Barbie" and needs to look the part. After all, why settle for smart and pretty when smart and drop-dead gorgeous is just a surgery away?
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Two sisters-both born with "long and hooked" noses-act as protagonists in this book about teenage plastic surgery. Cameron, on her way to college in California, became popular after her nose job, but still feels unable to "keep up" with the perfect girls she sees around her, and now wants breast implants. Meanwhile, younger athletic Allie is not sure that her own rhinoplasty, mostly her parents' idea, will be worth skipping a week of soccer camp, and a chance of playing on her school's varsity team. There's no missing that this is an issue-oriented book; even secondary story lines are designed to get readers thinking about the meaning-and price-of beauty: Cameron struggles to make a point with her photography portfolio, the girls' mother, a former actress, schedules her own face-lift, and Allie meets a retired movie star at the senior citizens home where she volunteers who tells her, "No one ever thinks they're beautiful enough." Readers also learn that there were more than 11.5 million cosmetic procedures performed in this country last year, and get gritty details about procedures and risks. Teens can draw their own conclusions, but they may find it easier to root for Allie, who realizes "Lots of people had big noses. They didn't all get them fixed. Somehow people managed." In the end, this is a provoking, if somewhat scripted, novel. Ages 14-up. (Oct.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
VOYA - Ria Newhouse
The wildly popular FX show Nip/Tuck has worked its way into teen fiction. Fifteen-year-old Californian Cameron "Beakface" Beekman moves from La Jolla to Bel Air just two weeks after her first encounter with plastic surgery-a wildly successful rhinoplasty that transforms Cameron "into one of the beautiful people." Three years later, Cameron grapples with the reality of leaving high school and starting college. Throughout the story, Cameron and her family question the myths and realities surrounding plastic surgery. Is beauty real? Can beauty age? When Cameron informs her parents that she is having a breast augmentation, the rest of the family cannot resist the urge to be beautiful as well: Mom Julie signs up to have a face lift, and sister Allie signs on (somewhat reluctantly) for her very own rhinoplasty. Although teens (girls especially) will likely clamor for this book, they will be savvy enough to hear the preachy undertones of this first novel. In a discussion about Vogue, Allie asks, "So those pictures don't mirror reality at all?" and Cameron responds with a simple "nope." Margolis is uneven in her approach to this hot topic; she simultaneously asks teen readers to recognize that beauty lies within, but also perpetuates the idea that beauty is bought and sold as a commodity. Asking readers to fully see both viewpoints is a tall task. The book is a fun, light read and the cover and subject matter will literally cause the book to fall into the hands of teens, but they will quickly realize that "drop dead gorgeous is [not] just a surgery away."
Children's Literature - Ilene S. Goldman
"It hurts to be beautiful," says the blurb on the back of Fix. The protagonist, Cameron Beekman, basks in the glory and popularity won by having a nose job and dying her hair before she changed schools for ninth grade. Now graduating, she is determined to have more surgery to make her pretty enough to attend UC "Santa Barbie." Meanwhile, her sister Allie struggles against having the nose job that her mother has scheduled for her. Yes, indeed, it hurts to be beautiful when you are a teenager raised with values that seem to offer nothing beyond wealth and beauty. Fix picks up on our society's valuation of sex appeal beyond all else; it offers a version of Nip/Tuck that might get teenagers to read, and it provides a compelling storyline that keeps the reader turning pages. Although the book seems to fight against this culture of beauty above all, the subject matter should give any parent pause. Is this really how we want our children to fill their minds? Are these the words we encourage them to read? How can we hope to raise children who value something other than sex and money if that is all they read about?
KLIATT - Amanda MacGregor
Allie is about to enter 10th grade and her parents have her present picked out for her: a new nose. Like her sister Cameron before her, Allie is to get a nose job to be more beautiful, like their ex-model/actress mother. The only problem is that no one has even asked Allie if this is what she wants. Everyone assumes that since Cameron's new nose changed her life, naturally Allie would want this, too, so she could become popular and cash in on her good looks. Allie isn't convinced she'll be any happier with a different nose—she's already happy—and has priorities other than beauty that take precedence. Cameron, on the other hand, is fixated on getting a breast augmentation, convinced that this is the next step to making her feel better about herself. She can't help but wonder if she would have the life she does if she had her former nose, but that doesn't stop her from making other changes. Their mother, in a bid to look younger and reinvigorate her acting career, decides to go in for a face lift. The saving grace of this book is that all three women look at plastic surgery from different perspectives and make choices that feel right for them. This keeps the story interesting and forces a deeper look at the reasons anyone would consider going under the knife. Many issues are examined, such as self-esteem, ageism, and media ideals. The women weigh the opinions of friends and boyfriends/husbands against their own, knowing that everyone feels differently about this controversial topic. Solid writing and a unique subject make this book a great addition to any collection, with plenty of material for discussion.
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up-Cameron, 18, and Allie, 15, have inherited their father's nose. However, thanks to their mother, Julie, an ex-model and former movie star, Cameron had her nose fixed three years earlier. She is thrilled with the results and contemplating breast augmentation. After years of being ridiculed by her peers, she was catapulted into the world of the beautiful and popular at her new school, Bel Air Prep. Allie, an avid soccer player, is not bothered by her appearance and already has self-confidence and friends. Still, now that she is 15, her mother insists on making appointments for her with the plastic surgeon, with little consideration of Allie's thoughts on the matter. Characters are more complex than they first appear, and a subplot involving Allie's befriending a now-elderly Hollywood starlet nicely contrasts with the beauty-obsessed Cameron and Julie. Margolis deals with the topic of plastic surgery evenhandedly, showing how it can be positive, but also excessive and extremely painful. She is never preachy, making this quick read entertaining and thought-provoking. Readers will relate to each sister's point of view.-Michelle Roberts, Merrick Library, NY Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439104248
  • Publisher: Simon Pulse
  • Publication date: 6/17/2008
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 543,300
  • Age range: 14 years
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Leslie Margolis
Leslie Margolis

Leslie Margolis is also the author of Boys Are Dogs, the first Annabelle Stevens book. She lives with her family in Brooklyn, New York. Sadly, she is allergic to cats.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 25 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 25 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 13, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Amazing book about plastic surgery

    This is a great book dealing with the rise of teenagers going under the knife to have plastic surgery done at such young ages. Cameron is really just a lot like many teenagers who are very affected by looks and how we are perceived. What I like is that even after she has her breasts augmented, she still does not feel the way she imagined in her mind she would be post surgery. Her younger sister Allie is the girl I liked the most. She is very sporty and very driven to be a great soccer player and do something with her life. She's the polar opposite of Cameron and even though she goes into the same doctors office, she has a lot more going on and does not feel the change is what she needs. Allie proves to girls out there that even though the idea of change might be strong...deep down you have to believe in yourself and you can not let the flaw affect you, but transform you internally.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 28, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Jocelyn Pearce for TeensReadToo.com

    Cameron and Allie are sisters. They used to look like it, too. Since Cameron turned fifteen, though, things have changed. Cameron and Allie inherited big noses from their father, but other than that, they both have the good looks of their mother, formerly a rather famous model. When Cameron turned fifteen, her life changed completely. For the better, she says. <BR/><BR/>How? She got a nose job. She turned from homely to gorgeous, moved to a new school, and now she's so much more popular and happy than before! Plastic surgery, Cameron feels, is a brilliant idea. It can fix everything, right? <BR/><BR/>Now she is turning fifteen, and Allie's mother feels that she needs the same birthday present Cameron got: a nose job. It made Cameron a much happier person, and who wouldn't want that for their other daughter? Problem is, nobody asked Allie. Allie is already confident and happy, the way Cameron keeps saying plastic surgery made her. There's one thing she's not that Cameron is, though: gorgeous. But really, does Allie need to be gorgeous? Or is that just what her family has led her to believe? <BR/><BR/>Leslie Margolis's novel FIX is, aside from being an interesting story about a family, particularly two sisters, a great look at a rather controversial issue: plastic surgery, particularly for teenagers. It shows all sides of the issue, from the perspective of two teenage girls (who, admittedly, could be slightly more realistic characters at times). It is a riveting story, and Allie's and Cameron's very different motivations for making the decisions that they do are quite believable. FIX is certainly worth reading, particularly for anyone who is considering plastic surgery for cosmetic reasons.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2008

    Liv's Book Reviews

    This book was rather boring. It had a good storyline and a good underlying message, but there wasn't enough meat in it to make a mark. I think the one thing that I liked about it was that it covered a topic I've never read about before. Plastic surgery is pretty controversial and I appreciated how the author didn't take a certain side on it. She showed how Cameron was happy with the perks surgery gave her and how her sister wasn't. I was expecting there to be a prominent pro or con attitude, but there wasn't. The book illustrated both sides of the argument and in the end let you choose for yourself where you stand. I also liked how Cameron and Allie grew throughout the story Cameron through her photography, and Allie through discovering who she wanted to be. It's nice to see characters that change and evolve. Even with all those good aspects, though, I wasn't satisfied. There were no enormous twists you were able to predict almost everything that happened, and there wasn't anything there that would make me want to keep reading besides to say that I finished the book. The pages didn't turn by themselves, and there was no true insentive to keep reading. Fix is a good book to read if you're looking for fresh subject material but not if your looking for something that's going to impact you. Although, given the topic, it could be that kind of book, it's not. Which is slightly disappointing to me. There was so much potential from working with new subject matter, and this book just didn't pull it off. Read it for something new and interesting, though. Maybe we can look forward to better books on the same topic later on.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2007

    Courtesy of Teens Read Too

    Cameron and Allie are sisters. They used to look like it, too. Since Cameron turned fifteen, though, things have changed. Cameron and Allie inherited big noses from their father, but other than that, they both have the good looks of their mother, formerly a rather famous model. When Cameron turned fifteen, her life changed completely. For the better, she says. How? She got a nose job. She turned from homely to gorgeous, moved to a new school, and now she's so much more popular and happy than before! Plastic surgery, Cameron feels, is a brilliant idea. It can fix everything, right? Now she is turning fifteen, and Allie's mother feels that she needs the same birthday present Cameron got: a nose job. It made Cameron a much happier person, and who wouldn't want that for their other daughter? Problem is, nobody asked Allie. Allie is already confident and happy, the way Cameron keeps saying plastic surgery made her. There's one thing she's not that Cameron is, though: gorgeous. But really, does Allie need to be gorgeous? Or is that just what her family has led her to believe? Leslie Margolis's novel FIX is, aside from being an interesting story about a family, particularly two sisters, a great look at a rather controversial issue: plastic surgery, particularly for teenagers. It shows all sides of the issue, from the perspective of two teenage girls (who, admittedly, could be slightly more realistic characters at times). It is a riveting story, and Allie's and Cameron's very different motivations for making the decisions that they do are quite believable. FIX is certainly worth reading, particularly for anyone who is considering plastic surgery for cosmetic reasons. **Reviewed by: Jocelyn Pearce

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2007

    ...

    this was definetly one of my favorite books. but i was very disappointed by the ending b/c the author left so many questions unanswered.. how is the moms career now? are eve and allie still close? does allie regret anything? how is cam doing w/ the new school and the new body and the photography? how is the father dealing? yknow i wish the end would have been more better but all in all it was a really good book..

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2013

    Ree

    Thx:*).... anyways jaysdens n @$$.he gunna break up with me again for some other girl but wteva he duz this all the time. Used to it-_-

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2013

    Joel

    W T F???

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2012

    Great book for girls

    This book gives an impottant life lesson that every girl should learn which is love yoursefl the way you are and your perfect the way you are. That's exctly what lead character Allie realizes. She doesnt have to be like everybody else you should just love yourself the way you are!!! On the other hand is sister of Allie: Cameren who is caught up in th ever changing world of Hollywood. Over a long time of working on her portfolio it gets regected. Camrren get another plasic surgery because she wants perfection but realizes that real people can never be perfection. So she puts together a portfolio about real people not barbie dolls. I only wish it was longer! That's the reason why I gave it 4 out of 5 stars.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 16, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    one of those books every girl should read

    Fix by Leslie Margolis is one of those books every girl should read. Furthermore, it should be required reading for anyone who even thinks about visiting a plastic surgeon.

    Fix follows the Beekman sisters, Cameron and Allie who are the alternate protagonists of the novel. When the book begins, Cameron has already had a nose job and is enjoying a better life thanks to the surgery and a school transfer. No more mean nicknames, no more bullies, no more feeling like an outcast.

    Getting ready to go to college, Cameron begins to wonder if she "needs" more cosmetic surgery in order to fit in on campus at UC "Santa Barbie." Meanwhile, Allie is getting ready for her own nose job and has to decide if being "pretty" is worth such drastic measures. No matter where you stand on the subject, the book will probably feature something you can agree with.

    Margolis really looks at the plastic surgery issue from all sides. The book is interesting but also informative. By the end of the novel, it's clear that there is no right answer about getting (or not getting) cosmetic surgery. But Margolis intelligently examines all sides of the issue highlighting the risks and the motivations that can lead a girl to the operating table.

    The writing style is clear. Margolis presents a lot of information about the risks of surgery without getting excessively gory or boring. Ally and Cameron look at the surgery issue very differently and Margolis does a good job of showing that. This fact is what elevates the book from a commentary on cosmetic surgery to a character study of how a girl can define and shape her own sense of beauty.

    The Beekman sisters are great protagonists for this novel. Even if they sometimes come off a bit flat. At times the characters seem more like archetypes than real people but that might be inherent to the nature of the book--since it is so clearly trying to start a conversation about this important issue. Secondary characters, in particular, often seem to lack dimension--appearing merely to make some important point: At times it seems like the characters are preaching their respective messages/opinions rather than taking part in a plot.

    Nonetheless, Fix is a quick, enjoyable and above all interesting read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2012

    fix

    Tell me someone should i get this book

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    Mew

    Hope tje world doesnt end up like this. Good read tho.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2011

    Tessa u

    Happy birthday tessa

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 8, 2011

    hopefully

    i hope this is good bc i plan on reading it

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2008

    .....

    this book was alright i agree with the other reviews...it was a little boring but it did have a good message and i red it pretty fast

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2007

    It was okay.

    It was ok. It was not the best book. I didn't understand the meaning. It hooked me, but at the end i asked myself:'Why did I read this?' It was one of the worst book i have ever read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2006

    wow

    This was a great book that raises alot of good questions about soceity and what beauty means. The author definately did her research on her subject, bringing in alot of medical background. This is a quick read and is very absorbing. However, it seems at the end that the author wasn't sure what message to send, especially with Cameron. It seems as if she's trying to say that Cameron has come to an understanding of it all when she finally makes her photo portfolio, but the book never decisevly goes in that direction. Excellent though.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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