Flashcards of My Life

( 6 )

Overview

When Emily receives a pack of note cards labeled "Flashcards of My Life" as an unexpected birthday present, she uses them as inspiration to journal and to untangle her knotted life. Includes illustrations by the author.

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$5.94
BN.com price
(Save 15%)$6.99 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (38) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $1.99   
  • Used (30) from $1.99   
Note: Visit our Teens Store.
Sending request ...

Overview

When Emily receives a pack of note cards labeled "Flashcards of My Life" as an unexpected birthday present, she uses them as inspiration to journal and to untangle her knotted life. Includes illustrations by the author.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Emily, the likable if long-winded narrator of Harper's (Fashion Kitty) novel, receives-as a gift-a box of fill-in flashcards labeled with topics about which she is meant to record her feelings (friends, embarrassment, regrets, pet peeves, fate, etc.). The candid girl takes full advantage of this venue to vent her quite typical middle-school angst. She grapples with the hypothetical complications of having a boyfriend, wondering how one juggles a boyfriend and friends, yet admits, "I still want one!" When she discovers that her best friend concealed the fact that she's been dating one of Emily's longtime pals, the heroine is distraught. And Emily worries about her parents' chronic bickering and is subsequently perplexed when they suddenly start getting along. Finally, devastation sets in when she hears the rumor that Andrew, the boy she has a crush on, likes another girl. (A sticky-sweet resolution occurs when Emily and Andrew share a kiss in the park.) Amidst her exhaustive ruminations, illustrated with simple line drawings and chatty charts, Emily dispenses some nuggets that readers will find familiar and comforting: "Things always look worse at night, when it's dark. Tomorrow everything will be... less bad." And, referring to a pimple on her chin: "It's amazing how something so small can ruin your day!" Harper's tale will elicit nods of recognition-and a few chuckles. Ages 8-12. (Jan.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
VOYA
Talking donuts, laughing trees, and the clothes that librarians wear (not!) are a few of the illustrations Emily includes in her journal that chronicles the roller coaster of her feelings. As a surprise birthday present, Emily's Aunt Chester sends her a package of cards, blank on one side, but with topics such as Friends, Embarrassment, Boyfriends, and Kissing on the other. Although Emily has never been one much for writing, she soon finds out she has a lot to say. Readers looking for unpredictability and non-stereotypical characters will not find them here, but what they will find is a narrator with a strong voice dealing with problems to which many teens can relate. Emily often feels like a klutz as her body is growing: "Just smashed my arm on the side of my dresser. It's like my arms and legs are too long for my body." She works hard to maintain her friendships. Thoughts of dating definitely top Emily's list of what is on her mind, "Benefit of Crush Luck at the Same Time: You can talk freely and often about how happy you are without worrying about hurting your friends' feelings because they don't have what you have." Readers who liked What My Mother Doesn't Know (Simon & Schuster, 2001/VOYA October 2001) or One of Those Hideous Books Where the Mother Dies (2004/VOYA October 2004) by Sonya Sones or the Princess Diary series by Meg Cabot will enjoy a glimpse into Emily's sometimes painful, sometimes hilarious life. VOYA CODES: 3Q 4P J (Readable without serious defects; Broad general YA appeal; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 2006, Little Brown, 233p., Ages 12 to 15.
—Kelly Czarnecki
Children's Literature - Amie Rose Rotruck
When Emily's Aunt Chester gives her a set of "Flashcards of My Life" for her birthday, Emily is not sure what do to with them. She is not much of a journal writer, even though Aunt Chester encourages her to write. Soon, however, Emily finds herself using the cards to describe her life and attempting to work through her problems. Emily's life consists of trying to juggle friend and boyfriend politics at school, plus her mother and father's constant cycle of fighting and making up. By writing about them on the cards, plus drawing illustrations (such as the "Boyfriend Obstacle Course" map), Emily finds the journaling gives her perspective on her life. While Harper has created a very vivid voice and style for Emily, at times Emily's voice does not match her age (quite often the book feels more like a middle school rather than a high school story). Much is made of Emily's Aunt Chester in the first chapter, but Aunt Chester never makes an appearance in the story. Still, Emily is a very engaging character and her journaling has enough humor to balance the typical teenage angst.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-7-Like many teens, Emily has tons of friends, thinks her parents are totally uncool, and wishes for a boyfriend. For her birthday, Aunt Chester sends her a set of blank cards called "Flashcards of My Life." Each card has a label like "Friends," "Kiss," "Identity"-different topics to spark some writing. Emily starts on the cards and, in the process, readers learn about her. Her best "24-hour" friend, Sandra, doesn't like her school friends, Sarah W. and Sarah J., leaving Emily stuck in the middle. The girls all have crushes on different boys and there's the constant swirl of rumors of who likes whom. The story is full of early teen angst-being uncomfortable in one's body, not sure why parents act like they do, crying over the smallest things. The style and language are aimed at younger readers; however, some of the topics make the story a better fit for older readers. For example, the girls think their gym teacher is a lesbian because of her roommate's picture on her desk. The font appears to be handwritten, and numerous doodles, charts, and diagrams adorn the pages. An entertaining but hardly earth-shattering look at junior high life.-Diana Pierce, Running Brushy Middle School, Cedar Park, TX Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
There's a lot to sort out in junior high: Emily's best friend, Sandra, doesn't like her other friends, "the Sarahs"; Emily thinks she might have a crush on Andrew, but is it only because she heard Andrew might be crushing on her; and will her endless-dieting mom and clueless dad ever be happy together again? An unexpected birthday gift, The Flashcards of My Life, might help Emily make sense of it all. With humor and insight, she focuses on such topics as kissing, embarrassing moments, regrets, talent and dreams. Readers will probably gloss over stereotypical inclusions of librarians' attire and a gym teacher who might be a lesbian, to take in Emily's "Girlfriend Sacred Rule," "Boyfriend Obstacle Course" with the "Must Pass My Friends' Let-Us-Decide-If-We-Like-Him Time Trial," and other amusing sketches, charts and checklists. Emily's search for the truth about friendship, romance and identity will appeal to 'tween fans of conversational chick-lit. (Fiction. 9-13)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316166768
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 3/7/2007
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 1,436,648
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

Charise Mericle Harper is the author of numerous books for children, including Imaginative Inventions and There Was a Bold Lady Who Wanted a Star, with Little, Brown. Her illustrations have appeared in the New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, Outside Magazine, Village Voice, Rolling Stone, San Francisco Magazine, and the San Francisco Examiner, among others. This is her first novel.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2006

    Dissapointing

    I didn't read the whole thing, but after 15 chapters I stopped becasue it was very babyish. The only reason I'm giving this two stars is because in one of the first few chapters, Emily made that friendship pyramid, and the different levels of it were very well-thought out. But otherwise, I wouldn't recommend it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2009

    Ehhhh

    I'm Not Sure That This Is Such A Great Book For Kids Under The Age Of Ten It's Not Really Very Apropret So Sorry!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 28, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Jennifer Wardrip, aka "The Genius" for TeensReadToo.com

    FLASHCARDS OF MY LIFE is a great book, not just for it's story (which is a cute, funny one!) but because of the pictures and illustrations. This art was done, in fact, by the author herself, which means 1) she's so totally multi-talented; and 2) I'm so totally jealous! <BR/><BR/>Emily is a pretty typcial young teen. She has plenty of friends, most specifically--Sandra, her 24-hour friend, her best friend, the one she tells everything to; Becca, her best-friend runner-up, the one she tells almost everything to; and Sarah W. and Sarah J., two girls she hangs with, but mostly just at school. The Sarah's don't mix well with Sandra, though, so it's a balancing act of friendship. <BR/><BR/>Emily also has a set of pretty normal parents. Her mother stays on the narrow road of dieting by making only desserts with nuts in them, since she's allergic. Her dad, though a good guy, is still totally oblivious to her mom's moods, which ends in alternate "I'm ignoring you" =slash= "we're giddy in love" weeks at Emily's house. <BR/><BR/>Add to that the social dynamics at school, the crushes of Emily and her friends, and the endless demand of trying to figure out what to do, what to say, and how to act, and life is pretty complicated. But thanks to her Aunt Chester (yes, Chester is a nickname, and no, she's not really Emily's aunt), Emily now has a new way of figuring out life--a birthday present containing FLASHCARDS OF MY LIFE. Cards with headings such as Friends, Food, Love, Kiss, Clothing, etc. that Emily can fill in herself, any way she chooses. And as she does so, she comes to realize that, all in all, her life is pretty good. And we, the reader, realize that it's also pretty darn funny. <BR/><BR/>Aimed more towards the younger teen or pre-teen set, FLASHCARDS OF MY LIFE is a laugh-out-loud, quick read that will leave you with the feeling of having just read a good story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2007

    A Great Book Full of Thoughts and Wisdom

    This is a wonderful and insightful book for any female. A grown woman could read this book and remember her own thoughts and feelings while navigating those tumultuous middle school years. Emily brings it all back to us by writing on special flashcards, (as opposed to a journal), which include her drawings, analysis of life from her perspective with amusing charts. Her wisdom grows from her observations and experiences. The beauty of this book is that it is timeless, and could happen anywhere. Ms. Harper wisely chose to do this without burdening the flavor or the story, the core feelings of the characters, their honesty and consideration about their dishonesty by not cluttering their communications with cell phones, IM, and text messaging. The mention of computers and use of e-mail is minimal. This book is a true example of how simple creativity did create a great coming of age story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2006

    Courtesy of Teens Read Too

    FLASHCARDS OF MY LIFE is a great book, not just for it's story (which is a cute, funny one!) but because of the pictures and illustrations. This art was done, in fact, by the author herself, which means 1) she's so totally multi-talented and 2) I'm so totally jealous! Emily is a pretty typcial young teen. She has plenty of friends, most specifically--Sandra, her 24-hour friend, her best friend, the one she tells everything to Becca, her best-friend runner-up, the one she tells almost everything to and Sarah W. and Sarah J., two girls she hangs with, but mostly just at school. The Sarah's don't mix well with Sandra, though, so it's a balancing act of friendship. Emily also has a set of pretty normal parents. Her mother stays on the narrow road of dieting by making only desserts with nuts in them, since she's allergic. Her dad, though a good guy, is still totally oblivious to her mom's moods, which ends in alternate 'I'm ignoring you' =slash= 'we're giddy in love' weeks at Emily's house. Add to that the social dynamics at school, the crushes of Emily and her friends, and the endless demand of trying to figure out what to do, what to say, and how to act, and life is pretty complicated. But thanks to her Aunt Chester (yes, Chester is a nickname, and no, she's not really Emily's aunt), Emily now has a new way of figuring out life--a birthday present containing FLASHCARDS OF MY LIFE. Cards with headings such as Friends, Food, Love, Kiss, Clothing, etc. that Emily can fill in herself, any way she chooses. And as she does so, she comes to realize that, all in all, her life is pretty good. And we, the reader, realize that it's also pretty darn funny. Aimed more towards the younger teen or pre-teen set, FLASHCARDS OF MY LIFE is a laugh-out-loud, quick read that will leave you with the feeling of having just read a good story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2006

    This book is great!!!

    I thought the characters were cool and it seemed so real!Such a tipical story and very funny!It will give you an inspiration to start writing in a jornal!loved it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)