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Flashman and the Seawolf
     

Flashman and the Seawolf

3.8 7
by Robert Brightwell
 

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Flashman and the Seawolf introduces a new member of the Flashman family and provides an illuminating insight into life in Georgian England and the extraordinary adventures of one of Britain's least known but inspirational naval commanders.

From the brothels and gambling dens of London, through political intrigues and espionage, the action moves to the

Overview

Flashman and the Seawolf introduces a new member of the Flashman family and provides an illuminating insight into life in Georgian England and the extraordinary adventures of one of Britain's least known but inspirational naval commanders.

From the brothels and gambling dens of London, through political intrigues and espionage, the action moves to the Mediterranean and the real life character of Thomas Cochrane. This book covers the start of Cochrane's career including the most astounding single ship action of the Napoleonic war.

Thomas Flashman provides a unique insight as danger stalks him like a persistent bailiff through a series of adventures that prove history really is stranger than fiction.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940033033416
Publisher:
Robert Brightwell
Publication date:
02/05/2012
Series:
Thomas Flashman Adventures , #1
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
210,651
File size:
328 KB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

I am a firm believer in the maxim that history is stranger than fiction. As an amateur historian there are countless times when I have come across a character or incident that has been so hard to believe that I have had to search out other sources for confirmation. Thomas Cochrane who features in my first book is one of those, his real life adventures seem ridiculously far fetched for a fictional character. The Begum of Samru from my second book is another: a fifteen year old nautch dancer who gained the confidence of an army, had a man literally kill himself over her and who led her soldiers with skill and courage, before becoming something of a catholic saint. History is full of amazing stories and in my books I try to do my bit to tell some of them. When I thought of a vehicle to do so, the Flashman series from George MacDonald Fraser came to mind. Most of what I know of the Victorian era was prompted by his books. The concept of a fictional character witnessing and participating in real historical events, while not unique, has rarely been done better. George MacDonald Fraser was an exceptional writer and he developed a character that he took from Tom Brown's School Days into a truly legendary figure. While Harry Flashman might not have been a typical Victorian, he certainly brought the period to life. For me the Regency/Napoleonic era was one of even greater colour and extremes and so I have created a new earlier member of the family: Thomas Flashman. There are similarities between the generations in that they both have the uncanny knack of finding themselves in the hotspots of their time, often while endeavouring to avoid them. Thomas though is not exactly the same character as Harry Flashman, this is partly accidental and partly deliberate. For example Harry Flashman makes prolific use of the 'n' word which will never appear in my work. This is not just political correctness but reflects the different times the two fictional characters occupy. While Harry Flashman in India thrashed and abused the natives; in Thomas' time many British were in business with Indian partners or had Indian wives. The British Resident of Delhi went so far as to marry a harem of thirteen Indian women who used to parade around the city every evening on elephants. In contrast any British man in Harry's time who married just one Indian woman was likely to find himself ostracised from the British community. As several reviewers have pointed out Thomas is not quite the vicious villainous rogue his nephew became, at least in the first book. As this was mostly set on a very small ship there were few places he could hide while retaining the confidence of the commander, which was crucial to the plot. I think the character develops more in the subsequent books with increasing levels of skulduggery. The genius of George MacDonald Fraser was to create a spiteful bully that the reader could still relate to. I have tried to convey a character that lived in his time and who balanced cowardice, pride, lust etc with the need to bring the reader with him.

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Flashman and the Seawolf 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well done, Robert Brightwell. Thomas Flashman is not the same as Sir Haryy, but an interesting and caddish character of his own. I recommend it if you are a fan of Fraser's Flashman, or a fan of naval stories. Look forward to more!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have also read the entire Flashman series and enjoyed this first in a series. I am looking forward to the next.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read all of the Flashman series and so thought I would give this a go. It was an excellent read and as I discovered on reading the historical notes and doing a bit of surfing, largely based on historical fact. The Flashman character is well developed and a rogue although adapted for the times he lived in so not exactly like the GMF character. Cochrane, the leading historical character had truly amazing real life adventures. I will certainly read the next one in the series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
benyovo More than 1 year ago
I suspect the 2 star reviewer wasn't familiar with GBF's Flashman series. This is a delightful read for any lovers of the 'scoundrel witness to history' genre. It takes place around the time of the Sharpe's Rifles series in and around French occupied Spain.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It seems to have followed another TV program which may or may not have been by this author. It is a fast pased book; am not sure about the sexual content. The sea adventures were good.