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Flatland: An Edition with Notes and Commentary / Edition 1
     

Flatland: An Edition with Notes and Commentary / Edition 1

3.8 126
by Edwin A. Abbott
 

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ISBN-10: 0521759943

ISBN-13: 9780521759946

Pub. Date: 12/31/2009

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Flatland, Edwin Abbott Abbott's story of a two-dimensional universe, as told by one of its inhabitants who is introduced to the mysteries of three-dimensional space, has enjoyed an enduring popularity from the time of its publication in 1884. This fully annotated edition enables the modern-day reader to understand and appreciate the many "dimensions" of this

Overview

Flatland, Edwin Abbott Abbott's story of a two-dimensional universe, as told by one of its inhabitants who is introduced to the mysteries of three-dimensional space, has enjoyed an enduring popularity from the time of its publication in 1884. This fully annotated edition enables the modern-day reader to understand and appreciate the many "dimensions" of this classic satire with commentary on language and literary style, including numerous definitions of obscure words and an appendix on Abbott's life and work. Historical commentary, writings by Plato and Aristotle, and citations from Abbott's other writings work together to show how this tale relates to Abbott's views of society in late-Victorian England and classical Greece. Approaching the book from a mathematical stance, additional note is and illustrations enhance the usefulness of Flatland as an elementary introduction to higher-dimensional geometry.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521759946
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
12/31/2009
Series:
Spectrum Series
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
750,928
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.80(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vii

Introduction 1

Flatland with Notes and Commentary 8

Part 1 This World

1 Of the Nature of Flatland 16

2 Of the Climate and Houses in Flatland 20

3 Concerning the Inhabitants of Flatland 26

4 Concerning the Women 34

5 Of our Methods of Recognizing one another 44

6 Of Recognition by Sight 54

7 Concerning Irregular Figures 66

8 Of the Ancient Practice of Painting 74

9 Of the Universal Colour Bill 80

10 Of the Suppression of the Chromatic Sedation 88

11 Concerning our Priests 96

12 Of the Doctrine of our Priests 102

Part II Other Worlds

13 How I had a Vision of Lineland 116

14 How in my Vision I endeavoured to explain the nature of Flatland, but could not 126

15 Concerning a Stranger from Spaceland 138

16 How the Stranger vainly endeavoured to reveal to me in words the mysteries of Spaceland 146

17 How the Sphere, having in vain tried words, resorted to deeds 164

18 How I came to Spaceland, and what I saw there 170

19 How, though the Sphere showed me other mysteries of Spaceland, I still desired more; and what came of it 180

20 How the Sphere encouraged me in a Vision 196

21 How I tried to teach the Theory of Three Dimensions to my Grandson, and with what success 204

22 How I then tried to diffuse the Theory of Three Dimensions by other means, and of the result 210

Epilogue by the Editor 220

Continued Notes 228

Appendix A Critical Reaction to Flatland 233

Appendix B The Life and Work of Edwin Abbott Abbott 239

Recommended Reading 267

References 269

Index of Defined Words 277

Index 280

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Flatland 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 126 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good read, don't buy it though. You can get it for free in public domain.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I recommend this as required reading for any geometry student and/or anyone who has ever given the slightest thought to dimensions other than our lovely 3rd dimension.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is going to be really corny, but it's true. This book influenced my decision to pursue mathematics and science as a career. Parts of it are a little dry, but these are the social commentary sections. I credit the rest of this book with equipping me to visualize higher dimensions. Definitely worth a read.
Kim_Duppy More than 1 year ago
My friends in the literature department will tell you that this is a clever novel about Victorian England. If that's all it were, I couldn't recommend it to anyone. In point of fact, this book is a kind of bare bones look at culture itself (not merely Victorian Culture). By reducing everything to shapes, the author manages to show how cultures evolve—or perhaps better put: how nature influences the development of culture. Plus, if you don't know much about geometry (I don't), you may learn a little about that as well.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This must be the best book I have read in years! It helped me understand mathematically and logically understand other dimensions as well as our own. This book will give you a glimpse of what living in a two dimensional world might look like, and also an Idea of what the fourth dimension might have in store in a logical manner. It also has a fantastic story and description of a two-dimensional culture, government and relationships. I strongly recommend it for geometry or advanced algebra students or anybody who wants a better understanding of multiple dimensions!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is an excellent choice for future math teachers. I am a junior in college getting my BA in Middle Level Math Education. This is an excellent book that will help understand demensions beyond our own.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've recommended this book to my students of Geometry, especially those who will be teachers. This is a delightful guide to the understanding dimensions beyond our own. Must be cautioned that it does seem sexist - maybe a reflection of the time it was written.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Edwin A. Abbott wrote the "FLATLAND: A Romance of Many Dimensions" in 1884. He created a fictional world called Flatland for readers and introduced this two-dimensional world by depicting a journey of Mr. Square. Abbott used picturesque language, vigorous examples and his fabulous logical thinking to lead readers to enter the world he made. In this magic world, the Flatland is filled with Points, Lines, Triangles, Squares, Pentagons, Polygons, and Circles. The Law of Nature in Flatland is different from the three-dimension world that readers live in, and women in Flatland are compared to needles. The narrator of this book is A. Square. He is a humorous and wise square. The society he lives in always emphasizes the social hierarchy, and the mind of government is narrow. After visiting Spaceland, where is also called three-dimension world, with a sphere, Mr. Square finally unhesitatingly believed there is a real world, which is not allowed by the government. He even thinks there are maybe more dimensions in the universe, which just are still not realized by people.  Many people discussed why Abbott wrote the "Flatland". Maybe he wanted to satirize the ugliness of government and society at that time by using an imaginary world, or maybe he wanted to eulogize the people who tried to break through hardship for revealing deeper cognitive about the world, we do not know. However, no matter what his purpose was, the book was regarded as the first book which presented the idea of a multi-dimensional world and discussed the relationship between every dimension scientifically. It is totally worthy to be read by people because in this childlike world, people not only can enjoy traveling the creative and amusing two-dimension world with the narrator, but also can learn many things, like what the society is look like in the late 19th century. Go read it! I bet you will get more fun!    --- By May 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really fun nerdy read. The narrators formal tone is a easy to adapt to snd its written to the reader. Nice quick read and fun world to envision.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Typing errors are frequent but not hard to understand, and the story is definitely worth it.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great! if flatland was real, i would gladly live there
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was easily the most entertaining math text I have read so far! I would recommend this text to anyone inrerested at all in reading it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago