Flatland: The Movie Edition

( 132 )

Overview

"Flatland has and always will be a fun and fascinating journey, showing us again how the world of mathematics can expand the mind and take the imagination to places where it didn't know it could play."—Danica McKellar, actress and author of the best-selling Math Doesn't Suck

"A fascinating look behind the scenes of the best Flatland movie yet. Long live A Square!"—Rudy ...

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Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions

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Overview

"Flatland has and always will be a fun and fascinating journey, showing us again how the world of mathematics can expand the mind and take the imagination to places where it didn't know it could play."—Danica McKellar, actress and author of the best-selling Math Doesn't Suck

"A fascinating look behind the scenes of the best Flatland movie yet. Long live A Square!"—Rudy Rucker, author of The Fourth Dimension

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Editorial Reviews

Natural History - Laurence A. Marschall
The book is the companion piece to a 2007 animated movie, but whether you see the movie or not, the book is a must-read. If you've never thought much about why we inhabit only three dimensions, it may turn your world inside out.
Discover Magazine - Scott Kim
Flatland fueled my interest in mathematics and creative thinking when I was a child. Now this classic story has been reinterpreted as a gloriously vivid movie that will excite both children and adults. This book completes the movie experience by providing the original book, the screenplay of the movie, and comments by the filmmakers.
Mathematical Gazette - Nick Lord
Flatland has inspired many sequels over the years since its publication, but the epithet 'original and best' strikes me as apt. Abbott displays marvelously playful inventiveness and sharp satirical intent. . . . It remains a splendidly readable book for formative minds of all ages.
Leonardo - Rob Harle
I thoroughly recommend this book and movie to those readers and viewers of all ages who like a little romance, mixed with adventure and drama and fantastic color animation.
From the Publisher
"The book is the companion piece to a 2007 animated movie, but whether you see the movie or not, the book is a must-read. If you've never thought much about why we inhabit only three dimensions, it may turn your world inside out."—Laurence A. Marschall, Natural History

"Flatland fueled my interest in mathematics and creative thinking when I was a child. Now this classic story has been reinterpreted as a gloriously vivid movie that will excite both children and adults. This book completes the movie experience by providing the original book, the screenplay of the movie, and comments by the filmmakers."—Scott Kim, Discover Magazine

"Flatland has inspired many sequels over the years since its publication, but the epithet 'original and best' strikes me as apt. Abbott displays marvelously playful inventiveness and sharp satirical intent. . . . It remains a splendidly readable book for formative minds of all ages."—Nick Lord, Mathematical Gazette

"The ultimate edition of the classic book."—
The Providence Journal

"Edwin Abbott's 1884 classic is billed here as a mathematical story, designed to stimulate young imaginations. But the tale of a two-dimensional 'Flatland' and a visiting sphere, who introduces the Gospel of the Three Dimensions, is also a timeless satire on class privilege. A delightful piece of science fiction, it explores how a 2D world might actually work. The book is nicely presented, and includes the full text of the original novel, the screenplay for the forthcoming film, commentaries from the filmmakers and stunning colour art taken from the film."—
New Scientist

"This new edition of the classic book maintains all the appeal of the original well-read and well-loved version."—
Mathematics Teacher

"I thoroughly recommend this book and movie to those readers and viewers of all ages who like a little romance, mixed with adventure and drama and fantastic color animation."—Rob Harle, Leonardo

Natural History
The book is the companion piece to a 2007 animated movie, but whether you see the movie or not, the book is a must-read. If you've never thought much about why we inhabit only three dimensions, it may turn your world inside out.
— Laurence A. Marschall
Discover Magazine
Flatland fueled my interest in mathematics and creative thinking when I was a child. Now this classic story has been reinterpreted as a gloriously vivid movie that will excite both children and adults. This book completes the movie experience by providing the original book, the screenplay of the movie, and comments by the filmmakers.
— Scott Kim
Mathematical Gazette
Flatland has inspired many sequels over the years since its publication, but the epithet 'original and best' strikes me as apt. Abbott displays marvelously playful inventiveness and sharp satirical intent. . . . It remains a splendidly readable book for formative minds of all ages.
— Nick Lord
New Scientist
Edwin Abbott's 1884 classic is billed here as a mathematical story, designed to stimulate young imaginations. But the tale of a two-dimensional 'Flatland' and a visiting sphere, who introduces the Gospel of the Three Dimensions, is also a timeless satire on class privilege. A delightful piece of science fiction, it explores how a 2D world might actually work. The book is nicely presented, and includes the full text of the original novel, the screenplay for the forthcoming film, commentaries from the filmmakers and stunning colour art taken from the film.
Mathematics Teacher
This new edition of the classic book maintains all the appeal of the original well-read and well-loved version.
Leonardo
I thoroughly recommend this book and movie to those readers and viewers of all ages who like a little romance, mixed with adventure and drama and fantastic color animation.
— Rob Harle
The Providence Journal
The ultimate edition of the classic book.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691136578
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 1/7/2008
  • Edition description: Media Tie
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 968,176
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author


Edwin A. Abbott (1838-1926), the author of more than fifty books, was headmaster of the City of London School and one of the leading educators of his time. Thomas Banchoff, a professor of mathematics at Brown University, is an authority on Abbott. "Flatland: The Movie" was written by producer "Seth Caplan", director "Jeffrey Travis", and director and animator "Dano Johnson". Caplan's film "Duncan Removed" received a student Emmy and was a student Academy Award finalist. He is also the producer of "In Search of a Midnight Kiss". Travis is an award-winning filmmaker who directed and wrote "Except For Danny", a 20th Century Fox television pilot. Johnson's animated short films, music videos, and political advertisements have won multiple awards and been shown in many film festivals.
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Read an Excerpt

Flatland The Movie Edition
By Edwin A. Abbott Thomas Banchoff Princeton University Press
Copyright © 2008
Princeton University Press
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-691-13657-8


Introduction Thomas Banchoff

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions is my favorite book and, as I stated at the end of my extra feature on the DVD of Flatland: The Movie, I am very happy to be a consultant on an adaptation that will introduce new generations to its themes and messages.

For those readers who are not yet familiar with the original book, I encourage you to read the story that inspired the film. The author of Flatland, Edwin Abbott Abbott, was a master teacher and educational reformer. His story is both a social satire confronting some of the most important issues of his day and an introduction to the challenge of coming to terms with geometry of higher dimensions. Through carefully crafted dialogue and satirical references to social issues in Victorian England, Abbott told a story that challenged readers to open their minds to new ideas. First published in 1884, the book sold out immediately and a second edition, with a new introduction by the author, was published a month later, and that is the edition included in this volume. More information about the background of the novel and its remarkable author can be found in the introduction to Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions in the Princeton Science Library edition, or one of the many other introductionsthat have appeared over the years in the dozens of editions in English, not to mention the more than twenty translations into foreign languages.

This introduction is aimed at readers who have read Flatland and who would like to compare it with the screenplay of Flatland: The Movie. When Abbott wrote the original, he had to rely on the imaginations of the readers for visualizing the universe he was describing. He provided only a few hand-drawn diagrams in the book. By contrast, the movie is full of richly textured images, and audiences will delight in discovering new details in repeated viewings. Just as we do not have to imagine what Harry Potter or Albus Dumbledore look like, or the details of the interior of the Great Hall at Hogwarts, we no longer have to rely on our imagination to picture the home or workplace of Arthur Square. The personalities of the characters were purposefully left undeveloped in the book, and they emerge in a much different way in the movie, both because of the rendition of the pictures and because of the power of the characters' voices.

Adapting this classic as a computer animated film challenged the creative team of Flatland: The Movie to engage a contemporary audience accustomed to modern conventions. As usual, writing a screenplay based on a book involves making a great many choices, not just what to include or leave out, but ways of introducing the characters and the world they live in, both in terms of the physical description of the surroundings and with regard to the issues and concerns that shape their society. Some viewers will look in vain for a favorite scene omitted from the final version, while others will delight in new elaborations of ideas only vaguely indicated in the book.

Both the book and the movie take on the task of presenting a new universe that probably was more strange in Victorian England than it is now. Two-dimensional worlds are more familiar to those who grew up with movies, television, and computer screens, even though the precursors of motion picture films were already in existence when the book first appeared. As animation techniques have evolved, audiences expect more and more from the visual effects in any modern adaptation, and Flatland: The Movie provides some great spectacles as background for a modern version of the story. Fractals adorn the two-dimensional landscape, and Arthur Square wonders, "Where in the Mandelbrot Set am I?" Even though he can't appreciate it from his original two-dimensional viewpoint, he might note the same repeated fractal patterns in the insides of his compatriots, upsetting as that might be: "I can see their insides and I'm going to be sick." The beautifully intricate cityscapes that we can see from our three-dimensional vantage point are even more impressive to Arthur, and eventually to Hex when they are brought up into the third dimension. The psychological message is made clear by Spherius: "Who would obey (the Circles') rules if they could see what you see?"

The temptation both in the book and in the movie is to take very seriously the questions about the details of a two-dimensional universe. How is it that Flatlanders move and carry things and eat and express affection? Abbott deals with a number of these questions in his book and then explains why he is not going further. Halfway through Flatland, at the beginning of Section 11, the narrator explains his decision:

"It is high time that I should pass from these brief and discursive notes about things in Flatland to the central event of this book, my initiation into the mysteries of Space. That is my subject; all that has gone before is merely preface."

"For this reason I must omit many matters of which the explanation would not, I flatter myself, be without interest for my Readers: as for example, our method of propelling and stopping ourselves, although destitute of feet; the means by which we give fixity to structures of wood, stone, or brick, although of course we have no hands, nor can we lay foundations as you can, nor avail ourselves of the lateral pressure of the earth; the manner in which the rain originates in the intervals between our various zones, so that the northern regions do not intercept the moisture from falling on the southern; the nature of our hills and mines, our trees and vegetables, our seasons and harvests; our Alphabet and method of writing, adapted to our linear tablets; these and a hundred other details of our physical existence I must pass over, nor do I mention them now except to indicate to my readers that their omission proceeds not from forgetfulness on the part of the author, but from his regard for the time of the Reader."

That list of things that the narrator chooses not to explain in the book includes a number of challenges that the creators of Flatland: The Movie had to face. Each time a viewer sees the film, new images come into focus. As some questions are answered, others suggest themselves. Viewers of the film and readers of the screenplay will find many topics for discussion and possible projects for groups or individuals in a class that uses the book and the movie to stimulate imagination. Although the story itself did not choose to tackle all the questions about the physics and physiology of Flatland, many readers of the book have taken up the challenge to imagine two-dimensional analogues of three-dimensional counterparts. Many very good examples of this exercise are included in The Planiverse, a novel by Alexander Dewdney inspired by a column he wrote for Scientific American on two-dimensional science and technology. Teachers often suggest to their students the project of designing something for the plane world that would correspond to an amusement park or a chemistry laboratory. The creators of Flatland: The Movie obviously enjoyed devising analogues of a fishbowl or a Tiffany lamp or a subway car, or the entire furnishings of a Flatland Victorian home. Like Abbott, they do not overly concern themselves with what keeps the water in the bowl or how tasers work in the plane. Not all of the questions can be answered in the film of course, and some readers will have a field day pursuing any number of them.

There are some major differences between the story in the book and the story in the film, some occasioned by the differences in our current attitudes toward societal issues and some that represent necessary abridgement of the occasionally detailed story line.

Most obvious is the treatment of women. A close reading of the original book makes it clear that the author is on the right side of this issue although the narrator's words reflect the prevailing Victorian habit of ignoring one whole dimension of women's existence. Debates in the popular press argued whether or not women should be allowed to attend college, and Abbott, as an educator, worked hard to provide educational opportunities for women as well as men. He was blocked in his efforts by the university establishment of his day, and that frustration is mirrored in the satirical treatment of Flatland society. A. Square firmly believes that men are intellectually superior to women, especially in rational argument, and he discounts and dismisses the qualities that are associated with women, for example compassion, loyalty, and affection. It is clear that Abbott is a believer in education that encompasses both the rational and the intuitive, and the artificial separation of these two ways of knowing is taken to absurd lengths in his novel.

So, how does the creative team of Flatland: The Movie approach the problem? Unfortunately there is still discrimination against women, even in our day, but the straight line motif does not work as well as a satirical device. More pertinently, it does not work from a cinematographic viewpoint since it is very difficult to get a one-dimensional creature to express emotions visually or to interact with a polygonal being. (Witness the encounter of Arthur Square with the jive-talking King of Lineland.) In this movie, men and women are all polygons. Arthur Square's wife Arlene is also a square, even though she still is the one in the house hold who shows compassion and understanding to a much greater degree than her authority-worshipping and somewhat impulsive husband. These are modern stereotypes of course, and can it be mere chance that Arthur is blue and Arlene pink? An even bigger change is the fact that the precocious grandchild in the story is now a granddaughter, Hex. Her color is yellow-orange, possibly in deference to the experience of whole generations of students who grew up using yellow hexagon blocks in kindergarten.

There are implied social rules in this new version of Flatland; for example, when Hex describes the rules of inheritance so that the children of two squares will be pentagons and a pentagonal married couple will produce hexagonal sons and daughters. Why should a husband and wife have the same number of sides? Is it a biological necessity, or social convention, or some law?

Another major difference between the film and the book has to do with the Isosceles class. In the original Flatland, there was a separate hierarchy amid the lower classes, all of them isosceles but distinguished by the size of their vertex angle. The butler would certainly lord it over a footman or trash collector, and this class consciousness at all levels was a popular feature of Victorian literature.

In the movie, this entire substructure is eliminated. All isosceles triangles seem to have approximately the same angle. Hex says, "Isosceles parents have equilateral children," as the first step in the upward social mobility in both the book and the movie, stating that a child has one more side (at least) than the parent. In the book, only an isosceles triangle with angle nearly equal to sixty degrees could expect to sire an equilateral son who then could be eligible to enter an entirely new level of society. In the movie, one might wonder where isosceles children come from. Presumably only some of the progeny of isosceles parents are equilateral and most of them are again isosceles, in order to account for the larger numbers of individuals in the lower classes. What Hex says is not wrong, just not completely accurate (assuming that we can discover the implied and unstated rules by deduction from observations).

Another major difference is that the figures in the movie have personalities, something deliberately downplayed in the book. Abbott purposefully made his Flatland society dull, whereas Flatland: The Movie is definitely rich in texture. The most obvious manifestation of this is the soundtrack, with a sweeping musical score and the recognizable voices of professional actors. Even before we see them in the extra features on the DVD, we recognize levels of intonation and emphasis, excitement and perturbation, in their interactions. This is true for the minor characters as well as the star, for example when Arthur's circular supervisor, Ms. Helios, speaks so threateningly (reminiscent of Roz, the supervisor in Monsters, Inc., whose voice happened to be provided by a male actor). One of the great virtues of a DVD is being able to see the interviews with the actors and to connect them with their voices. The DVD of Flatland: The Movie has the additional advantage that we hear the principal actors commenting on the story and about their own commitment to educational communication. Watching the body language of Tony Hale reading the part of the solipsistic King of Pointland adds incredibly to the experience of seeing the movie again. When Kristen Bell says, "Sweet," you can feel her appreciative excitement even more for having seen the interview. Seeing the interviews of real-life brothers Martin Sheen and Joe Estevez definitely makes their movie dialogues more meaningful, and Michael York's British delivery presents a properly superior, although not perfectly sympathetic Spherius.

One cinematographic device is initially disconcerting to a mathematician watching the film, and that is the apparent reversal of orientation that makes it possible for Arthur and Abbott Square to face each other at one time and to be looking in the same direction other times. In order to get from a picture of a right hand on a page to its left-handed mirror image, it is necessary to take up the figure from the plane into three-space, turn it over, and then to replace it on the plane. How can it happen in the movie that a figure can be looking left at one time and right at another? It is clear that it is desirable from the point of view of social interaction that a figure should not have to turn upside down in order to face another figure. Dano Johnson solved that problem in a particularly effective way-that he describes in his comments-namely that in fact each polygon has one eye, roughly in the center of one side, and two mouths, only the lower one of which is open at any particular time, so that the closed mouth is not apparent. That is really clever.

Another device that enables the cinematographer to inject some emotion is the blinking of the eyes, something that can't technically be done since an eyelid in Flatland would be a one-dimensional membrane that would come down over the exposed arc of the circular orb, not something that would "cover" the interior of the eye. One can imagine a defense for this, by saying that what really happens is that the eye clouds over occasionally, something mathematically possible that is represented by what looks like an eyelid covering the eye. Or one can just remind the reader that not all details can be dwelt upon.

Perhaps the largest difference between the book and the movie is the ending. Abbott's hero is definitely in a depressed state as he writes his memoir, languishing in a jail cell for seven years, only occasionally being visited by his brother, a fellow convict who can't really appreciate any of A. Square's attempts to express what he experienced in his brief visit to the third dimension.

The movie, on the other hand, ends on an up-note, with Hex revealed as the Apostle of the Third Dimension, quite confident that she can give a full account of her Spaceland visitation, as well as the theoretical underpinnings of the theory of three dimensions as developed by her absent mother (shades of Harry Potter?). The ending does come swiftly, with all its hope for a new world order.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Flatland by Edwin A. Abbott Thomas Banchoff
Copyright © 2008 by Princeton University Press. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.
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Table of Contents

Introduction Thomas Banchoff ix
FLATLAND The Book EDWIN A. ABBOTT
Part I: This World 13
Part II: Other Worlds 49
FLATLAND The Movie
Finding Flatland Seth Caplan 91
Imagining Flatland Jeffrey Travis 93
The Visual Design of Flatland: The Movie Dano Johnson 97
Screenplay 107
Movie Credits 163
About the Contributors 167

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 132 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(54)

4 Star

(27)

3 Star

(27)

2 Star

(11)

1 Star

(13)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 131 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2010

    Excellent book, available as free Epub elsewhere

    Good read, don't buy it though. You can get it for free in public domain.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2009

    Don't Judge a Book by its Cover

    I chose this book (foolishly) to purchase rather than other editions because of the colorful cover. This edition was exactly the same as the "Gutenberg Project's" Ascii edition. It had the same print styles, same illustrations (in ASCII ART) and font styles. This book was just printed out and bound version of the free "Gutenberg Project" edition (http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/201) which is just ridiculous. I of course could be wrong but the similarities are uncanny.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 17, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Not so flat after all

    My friends in the literature department will tell you that this is a clever novel about Victorian England. If that's all it were, I couldn't recommend it to anyone. In point of fact, this book is a kind of bare bones look at culture itself (not merely Victorian Culture). By reducing everything to shapes, the author manages to show how cultures evolve—or perhaps better put: how nature influences the development of culture.

    Plus, if you don't know much about geometry (I don't), you may learn a little about that as well.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2004

    Prepare to be amazed.

    I recommend this as required reading for any geometry student and/or anyone who has ever given the slightest thought to dimensions other than our lovely 3rd dimension.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2013

    A Timeless Classic

    This is going to be really corny, but it's true. This book influenced my decision to pursue mathematics and science as a career. Parts of it are a little dry, but these are the social commentary sections. I credit the rest of this book with equipping me to visualize higher dimensions. Definitely worth a read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2003

    A Great Book for the Open Mind

    This must be the best book I have read in years! It helped me understand mathematically and logically understand other dimensions as well as our own. This book will give you a glimpse of what living in a two dimensional world might look like, and also an Idea of what the fourth dimension might have in store in a logical manner. It also has a fantastic story and description of a two-dimensional culture, government and relationships. I strongly recommend it for geometry or advanced algebra students or anybody who wants a better understanding of multiple dimensions!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2000

    Excellent Choice for Student Teachers

    This book is an excellent choice for future math teachers. I am a junior in college getting my BA in Middle Level Math Education. This is an excellent book that will help understand demensions beyond our own.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2013

    Edwin A. Abbott wrote the "FLATLAND: A Romance of Many Dime

    Edwin A. Abbott wrote the "FLATLAND: A Romance of Many Dimensions" in 1884. He created a fictional world called Flatland for readers and introduced this two-dimensional world by depicting a journey of Mr. Square. Abbott used picturesque language, vigorous examples and his fabulous logical thinking to lead readers to enter the world he made. In this magic world, the Flatland is filled with Points, Lines, Triangles, Squares, Pentagons, Polygons, and Circles. The Law of Nature in Flatland is different from the three-dimension world that readers live in, and women in Flatland are compared to needles. The narrator of this book is A. Square. He is a humorous and wise square. The society he lives in always emphasizes the social hierarchy, and the mind of government is narrow. After visiting Spaceland, where is also called three-dimension world, with a sphere, Mr. Square finally unhesitatingly believed there is a real world, which is not allowed by the government. He even thinks there are maybe more dimensions in the universe, which just are still not realized by people. 
    Many people discussed why Abbott wrote the "Flatland". Maybe he wanted to satirize the ugliness of government and society at that time by using an imaginary world, or maybe he wanted to eulogize the people who tried to break through hardship for revealing deeper cognitive about the world, we do not know. However, no matter what his purpose was, the book was regarded as the first book which presented the idea of a multi-dimensional world and discussed the relationship between every dimension scientifically. It is totally worthy to be read by people because in this childlike world, people not only can enjoy traveling the creative and amusing two-dimension world with the narrator, but also can learn many things, like what the society is look like in the late 19th century. Go read it! I bet you will get more fun!    --- By May 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2013

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2013

    Great quick read

    Really fun nerdy read. The narrators formal tone is a easy to adapt to snd its written to the reader. Nice quick read and fun world to envision.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    Worth it!

    Typing errors are frequent but not hard to understand, and the story is definitely worth it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2012

    Horible

    Horible ebook a giant typo and to many big words!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2012

    TYPO BAD

    Give me a free typo free book anyday but dont give me a google pasted mess-up and call it a great free book

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2012

    flatland, one of the best

    Great! if flatland was real, i would gladly live there

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 29, 2012

    Student

    In class we have read this book it helps to have it explained by a teacher, it is very complex and dispite what the book says Abbott is not sexist, he is making fun of the time of whiched he lived in which many others were sexist. So his character A. Square acts as others. You might have to have a teachers guide to fully understand it because, if you are like me and my age it will help explain it in a way that really helps, WARNING: Many big words, lol

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2012

    An Amazing look into dimensions.

    This was easily the most entertaining math text I have read so far! I would recommend this text to anyone inrerested at all in reading it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Anonymous

    Have read before, is AWESOME!!!!!

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  • Posted December 25, 2011

    Excellent

    Great book, it does not age

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    A Sci Fi Classic

    It was mentioned in Infinite Jest, so I bought it. It's a little dry, but it contains some great concepts.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2011

    ONE GIANT TYPO

    It is clear that no one proof read this ebook
    I have enjoyed flatland since childhood but this is a disgrace even for a free book

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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