Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions

3.9 17
by Edwin A Abbott
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

This masterpiece of mathematical fiction is a delightfully instructive and highly entertaining satire that has charmed readers since its first publication in 1884. The work of English educator and Shakespearean scholar Edwin Abbott (1838-1926), it describes the journeys of A. Square, a mathematician and resident of the two-dimensional Flatland, where men may have any

Overview

This masterpiece of mathematical fiction is a delightfully instructive and highly entertaining satire that has charmed readers since its first publication in 1884. The work of English educator and Shakespearean scholar Edwin Abbott (1838-1926), it describes the journeys of A. Square, a mathematician and resident of the two-dimensional Flatland, where men may have any number of sides, depending on their social status. Through strange occurrences, Square was introduced to the mysteries of three-dimensional space, and was even able to venture into a land of four dimensions. Isaac Asimov describes Flatland as "the best introduction one can find into the manner of perceiving dimensions." Flatland is a fascinating reading for mathematics, physics, and computer science students, and adults alike.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781495971990
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
02/17/2014
Pages:
104
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.22(d)

Meet the Author

Edwin Abbott (1838 - 1926) was an English schoolmaster and theologian, most famous as the author of the social satire Flatland (1884), with its use of mathematical dimensions in religious and political allegories.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Tab Lloyd More than 1 year ago
Great story...really gets one thinking about multidimensional possibilities. Ian Stewart's annotated version is nice. He explains mathemarical concepts as well as Victorian-era cultural influences. E.A. Abbott's perspective writing is insightful and ammazing!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you've not read this introduction to dimensional geometry and satire of Victorian society, it's worth a read. It's only 80 pages, so it can read in a couple sittings. This free edition has almost no errors, which is quite rare in these scanned titles. If you're looking for a free edition, this one should suit.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book would not load. I guess you get what you pay for. :s I'll be trying another version. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
It was mentioned in Infinite Jest, so I bought it. It's a little dry, but it contains some great concepts.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The introduction should be saved for last as suggested by the writer because it will bring perspective to the two dimensional world. As a physician, i encounter two dimensions everyday with reading of mri's, cat scans, etc. And never realized this. Overall, it was pure genius.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is this a ROMANCE romance (guys and gals getting very close), or just a romance (kisses and hugs in full clothing)?
J-A-R More than 1 year ago
Flatland was a very interesting book. The world is completely different from the world we have today. For one in this book the people are shapes. In our world we have humans. Another huge difference is in the world of FLatland the miltary is nothing to them but in this world our miltary is everything to us. If we didn't have a miltary we wouldn't have half of the things we have today. The main difference to me being that I am a female is women in this book are treated like they are not important. They have separate doors away from the men's doors. In this world there are still some sexist people but it is still better than how the women in FLatland get treated. Although I disagree with some of the things in this book overall this book is good and I would recommend it to people and I would also like them to comment to see if they share the same feelings I have or if they have the complete opposite reaction from what I have.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago