The Flavors of Southern Italy by Erica De Mane, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
The Flavors of Southern Italy
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The Flavors of Southern Italy

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by Erica De Mane
     
 

Praise for Erica De Mane

"Erica De Mane is an experienced, generous home cook who understands how both Italians and Americans like to eat, and she deftly manages to bridge the two cultures."
-Corby Kummer, The New York Times

"De Mane tells you things you need to know. . . . Her philosophy is contagious. The tone is friendly. The result is liberating. The

Overview


Praise for Erica De Mane

"Erica De Mane is an experienced, generous home cook who understands how both Italians and Americans like to eat, and she deftly manages to bridge the two cultures."
-Corby Kummer, The New York Times

"De Mane tells you things you need to know. . . . Her philosophy is contagious. The tone is friendly. The result is liberating. The confidence can't help but build."
-Ronalie C. Peterson, The Washington Post

"I found myself nodding in appreciation of Erica De Mane's willingness to hand over the keys to being a good cook."
-Susie Middleton, Fine Cooking magazine

Savor the rich flavors of Southern Italy with this exciting collection from experienced cook and food writer Erica De Mane. From classic recipes to new interpretations, from multi-course meals to easy antipasti, here are dishes for cooks of all levels that capture the taste and spirit of one of the world's most beloved cuisines.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

There are plenty of southern Italian cookbooks; what makes De Mane's comprehensive volume special is recipes like Caponatina, her simple but inspired version of the classic Sicilian eggplant salad which she spikes with pears. (Kate Heddings, Food & Wine Food Senior Editor, June 2004)

DeMane (Pasta Improvvisata) hones her flavor-combining philosophy and skills in this volume that successfully-and wonderfully-improvises on traditional recipes of southern Italian cuisine. She bases her dishes on the cooking of her grandmother, who emigrated from a town on the Campania-Apulia border; from there, DeMane has adapted her recipes according to ingredients available in the U.S. (mostly New York); the busy lifestyle of today's home cooks; and, finally, her own personal taste. DeMane's adaptations are subtle, but their effect is powerful. For example, she eschews sausage for prosciutto in Orecchette with Broccoli Rabe, Prosciutto, and White Wine. For main courses, she brings to the table Braised Sausages with Green Grapes, Wine and Bay Leaves; Pork Chops with Gentle Vinegar Peppers (into which she mixes anchovy fillets and marjoram); and Grouper Wrapped in Prosciutto and Served with a Winter Tomato Sauce (made with Marsala wine, sage and rosemary). Her salads are standouts (many, she maintains, can be a full dinner): Strawberry and Wild Watercress Salad with Pine Nuts; and Spinach Salad with Pears, Spiced Walnuts, and Ricotta Salata. Equ ally simple though enticing are DeMane's antipasti (e.g., Sautéed Cerignolo Olives with Fennel and Mint) and contorni, such as Potato and Sweet Pepper Gatto, Calabrian Style (made with vermouth, pecorino and caciocavallo cheeses). While lacking essential photos and illustrations, DeMane's clear and easy narrative and her abundance of flavorful recipes make this a valuable collection. (May) (Publishers Weekly, April 26, 2004)

Publishers Weekly
DeMane (Pasta Improvvisata) hones her flavor-combining philosophy and skills in this volume that successfully-and wonderfully-improvises on traditional recipes of southern Italian cuisine. She bases her dishes on the cooking of her grandmother, who emigrated from a town on the Campania-Apulia border; from there, DeMane has adapted her recipes according to ingredients available in the U.S. (mostly New York); the busy lifestyle of today's home cooks; and, finally, her own personal taste. DeMane's adaptations are subtle, but their effect is powerful. For example, she eschews sausage for prosciutto in Orecchette with Broccoli Rabe, Prosciutto, and White Wine. For main courses, she brings to the table Braised Sausages with Green Grapes, Wine and Bay Leaves; Pork Chops with Gentle Vinegar Peppers (into which she mixes anchovy fillets and marjoram); and Grouper Wrapped in Prosciutto and Served with a Winter Tomato Sauce (made with Marsala wine, sage and rosemary). Her salads are standouts (many, she maintains, can be a full dinner): Strawberry and Wild Watercress Salad with Pine Nuts; and Spinach Salad with Pears, Spiced Walnuts, and Ricotta Salata. Equally simple though enticing are DeMane's antipasti (e.g., Saut ed Cerignolo Olives with Fennel and Mint) and contorni, such as Potato and Sweet Pepper Gatto, Calabrian Style (made with vermouth, pecorino and caciocavallo cheeses). While lacking essential photos and illustrations, DeMane's clear and easy narrative and her abundance of flavorful recipes make this a valuable collection. (May) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471272519
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
05/07/2004
Pages:
464
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x (d)

Meet the Author


ERICA DE MANE writes on Italian cooking for Food & Wine, Fine Cooking, Saveur, the New York Times, Gourmet, and Marie Claire. She contributed to Joy of Cooking and is the author of Pasta, as well as Pasta Improvvisata. A member of the New York Culinary Historians and the Italian-based International Slow Food Movement, she lives in New York City.

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Flavors Of Southern Italy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great book, especially for those who have to cook every day. No hard to find fancy ingredients, great writing and recipes that are easy to make and very different. I have a family and do all the cooking in this house. I sometimes get really tired of making the same old things. This book is not only enjoyable to read, but Erica De Mane seems to understand that many of us do not have all day to go out and gather up exotic ingredients. She even suggests replacement ingredients if you do not have exactly what the recipe calls for. A great book for all cooks: beginners, everyday and gourmet.