×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Flemish
     

Flemish

by Caroline Knox
 

"A most inquisitive poet who relishes living inside her expansive vocabulary."—C.D. Wright

A web of wholly original madhattery, Flemish showcases serious language play and the skill of a master craftsperson. Caroline Knox is writing at the top of her game, and reading her is a pleasure not to be missed.

Our font is full of construction-
paper

Overview

"A most inquisitive poet who relishes living inside her expansive vocabulary."—C.D. Wright

A web of wholly original madhattery, Flemish showcases serious language play and the skill of a master craftsperson. Caroline Knox is writing at the top of her game, and reading her is a pleasure not to be missed.

Our font is full of construction-
paper fish, made by
the church school for us to

each take home one of,
a reverse tithe.

Caroline Knox is the recipient of numerous awards and has been a visiting fellow at Harvard University.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Knox’s eighth collection begins with the poem “Chartist,” in which the subject’s daily life leads him to take the roles of various characters: “He was a Chartist in his apartment/ opening cherrystones for guests at lunch…he was a parodist, he was a quietist…he was a dynast.” In the ensuing 29 poems, Knox (Quaker Guns) dresses her speakers and her cacophony of subjects (sister, otters, Dickinson, Mary Wesley) in whatever clothes history hands them (or she conjures up), letting them act out their roles on a spindle of wordplay and pathos. While play and obscure personal humor are Knox’s usual m.o., occasionally she strives for a Shakespearean level of diction-twisting and inference, as in the long poem “Subjects” and the mini-play “Coffee Cantata” (LISA: Seeking suitable beaux / gladly my father goes/ and little my heart he knows:// it shall be sworn in the prenup / I’ll brew and pot and drink it up / whenever I desire a cup. // DAD: I’m off to town a husband to produce.// BARISTA: I’d like to think that I could be of use.” And in a few poems, like the gorgeous “The Eaves,” she elevates her eye for the incidental into the kind of verse that prods her forebears’ influence just-so into the adjoining room, where “borrowed and leftover light glances off the textured, mushy, or glazed surfaces of nature, manufacture.” (Apr.)
From the Publisher

By turns funny, esoteric, and absurdist, Flemish is also positively enthralling, an energetic paean to language, the object, and the history of language and of objects. —Seth Abramson, Huffington Post

Knox dresses her speakers and her cacophony of subjects (sister, otters, Dickinson, Mary Wesley) in whatever clothes history hands them (or she conjures up), letting them act out their roles on a spindle of wordplay and pathos. —Publishers Weekly

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781933517650
Publisher:
Wave Books
Publication date:
04/02/2013
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author


Caroline Knox’s Nine Worthies was published by Wave Books in 2010. Quaker Guns (Wave Books, 2008) received a Recommended Reading Award 2009 from the Massachusetts Center for the Book. He Paves the Road with Iron Bars, published by Verse Press in 2004, won the Maurice English Award 2005 for a book by a poet over 50. A Beaker: New and Selected Poems appeared from Verse Press in 2002. Her previous books are The House Party and To Newfoundland (Georgia 1984, 1989), and Sleepers Wake (Timken 1994).

Her work has appeared in American Scholar, Boston Review, Harvard, Massachusetts Review, New Republic, Paris Review, Ploughshares, Poetry (whose Bess Hokin Prize she has won), TriQuarterly, The Times Literary Supplement, and Yale Review. Her poems have been in Best American Poetry (1988 and 1994), and on Poetry Daily.

She has received awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ingram Merrill Foundation, the Massachusetts Cultural Council (1996, 2006), The Fund for Poetry, and the Yale/Mellon Visiting Faculty Program. She was the judge for the Alice Fay DiCastagnola Award of the Poetry Society of America in Spring 2003, and was a Visiting Fellow at Harvard in 2003-2004. With Matthea Harvey and Peter Gizzi, she was a judge of the James Laughlin Award 2007.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews