Flesh and Spirit in the Songs of Homer: A Study of Words and Myths

Flesh and Spirit in the Songs of Homer: A Study of Words and Myths

5.0 1
by Michael Clarke
     
 

ISBN-10: 0198152639

ISBN-13: 9780198152637

Pub. Date: 04/28/2000

Publisher: Oxford University Press

This book offers a newly integrated interpretation of Homeric man. The author starts with the working hypothesis that, in this poetry, the human being is not divided into two parts - inner and outer; body and soul; flesh and spirit - but stands as an indivisible unity. The last part of this analysis leads to a reassessment of the Homeric psuche.

Overview

This book offers a newly integrated interpretation of Homeric man. The author starts with the working hypothesis that, in this poetry, the human being is not divided into two parts - inner and outer; body and soul; flesh and spirit - but stands as an indivisible unity. The last part of this analysis leads to a reassessment of the Homeric psuche.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780198152637
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
04/28/2000
Series:
Oxford Classical Monographs Series
Pages:
400
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.60(h) x 1.10(d)

Table of Contents

Texts, Abbreviations, and Commentaries xii
Part I: Prologue
Homeric Words and Homeric Ideas
Reading Homer in isolation
4(5)
Religion and world-picture
9(4)
Words and ideas
13(9)
Poetic language and poetic ideas
22(4)
The integrated study of Homer
26(5)
Semantic reconstruction
31(6)
The Categories of Body and Soul
Asking the right questions
37(2)
Dualism of body and soul is insidious
39(3)
Dualistic words and categories constrain scholarship
42(5)
The quest ahead
47(6)
Part II: The Language of Thought and Life
The Breath of Life and the Meaning of ψυχη
The shape of Homeric man
53(2)
Does the living man have a ψυχη?
55(6)
Mental Life and the Body
θs;υμos and its family
61(1)
The idea of psychological identity
61(2)
The mental apparatus has many names but is undivided
63(3)
Mental agents and functions are one
66(3)
The sliding scale of agency and function in Iliad I-VI
69(4)
Mental life is in the breast
73(6)
Mental life ebbs and flows as breath and fluids
79(11)
New emotions flow into the mental apparatus
90(2)
The flow of bile, χoλos
92(5)
The stuff of thought alternately softens and coagulates
97(4)
In folly the stuff of thought is dispersed
101(5)
Homeric psychology is a seamless garment
106(3)
The defining factor can be in movement not substance
109(6)
The body and the self are one
115(1)
Body and not-body
115(4)
As voos thought goes beyond the apparatus in the breast
119(10)
Part III: Death and the Afterlife
The Dying Gasp and the Journey to Hades
Loss of ψυχη is not departure of soul from body
129(1)
Loss of θs;υμos is loss of breath and life
130(3)
Loss of ψυχη is likewise loss of breath
133(4)
Loss of ψυχη can be its annihilation
137(2)
θs;υμos can be lost temporarily by swooning
139(1)
ψυχη is gasped out, θs;υμos is breathed back in
140(4)
ψυχη, ψυχρos, ψυχω refer to coldness, breath and blowing
144(3)
ψυχη has two senses in two narrative contexts
147(1)
The image of the flying ψυχη yokes the two together
148(3)
The image of flight emerges from that of lost breath
151(6)
The Corpse and the Afterlife
The corpse has lost vitality but still holds identity
157(3)
To die is to waste away enfeebled
160(1)
When is the corpse distinguished from the dead man?
161(4)
Mutilation of the corpse is mutilation of the man
165(1)
Hades is beyond the darkness of death
166(2)
Allusion to the descent in rhetorical and synoptic style
168(2)
Mutilation is alluded to in the same way as Hades
170(2)
The descent of ψυχη emerges from the descent of κ∈φs;αλη
172(6)
Hades is below the earth men stand on
178(2)
The purpose of the funeral is social
180(10)
ν∈κυs/ν∈κρos denotes both corpse and dweller in Hades
190(1)
The dweller in Hades is corpse or shade
191(3)
The shade is defined as remnant or as counterfeit
194(4)
The shade's movement names it as ψυχη
198(2)
The identity of the shade is indeterminate
200(5)
The shade is an image of the undivided bodily man
205(2)
These articulations are irreconcilable: a problem
207(4)
Patterns of the relation between shade and corpse
211(20)
Appendix: 1. The unity of the Nekuia
215(10)
The authenticity of the Second Nekuia
225(6)
Part IV: The Shaping of Myth
The Personalities of Death
How does the visible world relate to the mythical?
231(1)
The divinities of death
231(4)
Sleep has a fluid personality
235(4)
The descent of darkness is the experience of death
239(4)
Death approaches and seizes the victim
243(8)
The planning of fate leads to death's fulfilment
251(2)
The same names can be used without mythical import
253(4)
Death comes from the arrows of Artemis and Apollo
257(2)
Mythical forms in stories of the gods and in works of art
259(2)
'Everything is full of gods'
261(3)
Conclusion: The Dynamics of Mythical Image-making
The suppleness of myth
264(2)
The divine society
266(3)
Ares and war
269(3)
Helios and Scamander
272(4)
The supple identity of ψυχη
276(1)
The double plane of causation
277(5)
The double plane of death
282(39)
Epilogue: Flesh and Spriti in Language and Lore after Homer
Reference 321(20)
Index of Words 341(6)
Index of Passages 347(22)
General Index 369

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Flesh and Spirit in the Songs of Homer: A Study of Words and Myths 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Manirul More than 1 year ago
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