The Flipside of Feminism: What Conservative Women Know -- and Men Can't Say

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Overview

Forty years have passed since the so-called women's movement claimed to liberate women from preconceived notions of what it means to be female - and the results are in. The latest statistics show that as women have gained more freedom, more education, and more power, they have become less happy. In The Flipside of Feminism, Suzanne Venker and Phyllis Schlafly provide readers with a new view of women in America - casting off the ideology that preaches faux empowerment and liberation from men and marriage. Their ...

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The Flipside of Feminism: What Conservative Women Know -- and Men Can't Say

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Overview

Forty years have passed since the so-called women's movement claimed to liberate women from preconceived notions of what it means to be female - and the results are in. The latest statistics show that as women have gained more freedom, more education, and more power, they have become less happy. In The Flipside of Feminism, Suzanne Venker and Phyllis Schlafly provide readers with a new view of women in America - casting off the ideology that preaches faux empowerment and liberation from men and marriage. Their book demonstrates that conservative women are, in fact, the most liberated women in America and the folks to whom young people should be turning for advice. Their confident and rational approach to the battle of the sexes is precisely what America needs.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781935071273
  • Publisher: WND Books, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/15/2011
  • Pages: 248
  • Sales rank: 520,924
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

A former teacher-turned-social critic, Suzanne Venker is an author and speaker on politics, marriage, parenting, and the culture. A well-known commentator on cultural issues, Suzanne has appeared on ABC, CNN, FOX, Huff-Po Live and C-Span—as well as hundreds of radio shows throughout the country, including the Laura Ingraham Show. How to Choose a Husband is her third book.

Phyllis Schlafly has been a national leader of the conservative movement since the publication of her bestselling 1964 book, A Choice Not an Echo. She has been a leader of the pro-family movement since 1972 when she started her national volunteer organization, Eagle Forum. In a ten-year battle, Mrs. Schlafly led the pro-family movement to victory over the principal legislative goal of the radical feminists called the Equal Rights Amendment.

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Table of Contents

A Note from the Authors xi

Introduction: Conservative Trailblazers Suzanne Venker 1

1 Brainwashed 13

2 Feminism 101: Uncensored 27

3 Hook-Ups and Heartache 57

4 Why Marriage Eludes the Modern Generation 71

5 When Mothers Work 97

6 Pandering to the Female Left-at Your Expense 125

7 The Expendable Male 141

8 A New Road Map for Women 167

Appendix A The Ten Feminist Commandments 185

Appendix B Sense & Sexuality: The College Girl's Guide to Real Protection in a Hooked-Up World Miriam Grossman, M.D. 187

Appendix C 1991 NOW Resolutions 191

Bibliography 197

Notes 205

Index 219

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
( 14 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2011

    Great Fairytale but Sloppy Non-Fiction

    This book comes from no informed opinion, but rather a commentator type who likes to gain attention by ruffling feathers. At least that's what I'm hoping. I just can't believe that any woman with even limited access to history could believe this stuff is true. It's grossly inaccurate. And why are there two different taglines? "What smart women know" vs. "What conservative women know" - That right there proves my point these authors are riding the same wave as a shock-jock. They write about giving up a "posh lifestyle" when most families need two incomes just to pay the mortgage. I'm not sure what world these women are living in, but most of the middle class can't afford the luxury of a stay-at-home mom.

    Speaking of luxuries, what a luxury it is to be able to WRITE a book, huh ladies? There was a time not long ago that wouldn't have been allowed.

    8 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Not factual in the least

    I felt the author held some harboring grudge over anyone slightly left, and made it clear from the start of the book. It felt very much like the author didn't even investigate on the other point of view. I couldn't stand reading anymore of this blatant ignorance.

    6 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 6, 2012

    definitely a must read

    This book is so good at explaining why the rise of feminism is not truly about empowering women. I think all girls/women should read this. They don't tell you to sit at home and not do anything but they explain what women's God-given roles are and how feminism has ruined many women's/children's lives and perspectives have become warped.

    5 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2013

    Propaganda.

    I tried to keep an open mind when reading this book. I actually do agree with some of the ideas put forth by the authors -- that there are fundamental differences between men and women, for example, or that children tend to benefit from a parent being home -- but unfortunately once the book described Fox News as "fair and balanced," I had a hard time taking it seriously.

    The authors make many claims that are not backed up by any sort of evidence, such as that "most American women are conservative." At other times, two sides of an argument are presented, and even though the situations are virtually identical, one is described as not deserving of any merit, and the other (that supports their view) as representative of women at large.

    The book's cited evidence is clearly heavily biased and not the most credible. The authors seek to convince the reader that women were best off as submissive partners who tamed their husbands' sexuality, and that pursuing an education or career is highly detrimental for females. They champion religion over rationalism, and claim that women are happiest and best suited to marry young, stay at home with their ubiquitous children, and learn to depend on a man for everything they may need financially or otherwise not directly related to childrearing.

    TL;DR:
    The book's few valid points are overshadowed by its disregard for logic and credible source material. It argues, essentially, that women are better off at home and pregnant than educated and self-sufficient, no matter their background or situation.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 3, 2011

    Highly Recommend

    This book exposes all the myths the feminist movement has crammed down women's throats these past 40 some odds years.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted July 3, 2011

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    Posted October 27, 2012

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    Posted January 28, 2014

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    Posted March 28, 2011

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    Posted May 8, 2011

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    Posted April 23, 2011

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