Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality by Joan Frances Casey, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality

Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality

by Joan Frances Casey
     
 

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Originally published in 1991, The Flock is the groundbreaking first-person account of successful recovery from dissociative identity disorder, known then as multiple personality disorder—and still a controversial subject in the field of psychiatry. This harrowing tale retains all its power to shock, fascinate, and enlighten.
 
When Joan

Overview

Originally published in 1991, The Flock is the groundbreaking first-person account of successful recovery from dissociative identity disorder, known then as multiple personality disorder—and still a controversial subject in the field of psychiatry. This harrowing tale retains all its power to shock, fascinate, and enlighten.
 
When Joan Frances Casey, a married twenty-six-year-old graduate student, “awoke” on the ledge of a building ready to jump, it wasn’t the first time she couldn’t explain her whereabouts. Soon after, Lynn Wilson, an experienced psychiatric social worker, diagnosed Joan with multiple personality disorder. She prescribed a radical program of reparenting therapy to individually treat her patient’s twenty-four separate personalities. As Lynn came to know Joan’s distinct selves—Josie, the self-destructive toddler; Rusty, the motherless boy; Renee, the people pleaser—she uncovered a pattern of emotional and physical abuse that had nearly consumed a remarkable young woman.
 
Praise for The Flock

“A testimony to [Casey’s] courage and the dedication of her therapist, who believed that a profoundly fragmented self has the capacity to heal within a loving therapeutic relationship.”The New York Times Book Review
 
“Absolutely mesmerizing . . . the first coherent autobiographical study of its kind.”The Detroit News
 
“A compelling psychological odyssey offering unique insights into a nightmare world.”Kirkus Reviews
 
“Extraordinary . . . deftly told and studded with striking images.”Publishers Weekly

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“A testimony to [Joan Frances Casey’s] courage and the dedication of her therapist, who believed that a profoundly fragmented self has the capacity to heal within a loving therapeutic relationship.”The New York Times Book Review
 
“Absolutely mesmerizing . . . the first coherent autobiographical study of its kind.”The Detroit News
 
“A compelling psychological odyssey offering unique insights into a nightmare world.”Kirkus Reviews
 
“Extraordinary . . . deftly told and studded with striking images.”Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this extraordinary, convincing account of her psychological fragmentation and arduous journey toward wholeness, the pseudonymous Casey displays the impulse toward health that seems a driving force of nature. She begins her story, with all names and locations changed, at the University of Chicago, where, as a graduate student, she sought counseling in 1981. Unlike Casey's previous experiences of quick-fix therapy, this time the psychotherapist, Wilson, proved a sensitive listener. Casey soon revealed her secret names, marking different selves with distinct memories and, as observed by Wilson, distinct voices, postures and expressions. Originally opposed to Wilson's diagnosis of Multiple Personality Disorder, Casey embraced it during her struggles over the four-year course of intensive therapy, through stages of cooperation, opposition and even sabotage among selves that included the competent Renee, scholar Joan, self-destructive Josie, self-possessed Kendra and Rusty, a boy. Wilson's interspersed notes, covering her concerns as she extended therapy beyond the office and included her husband, a high school teacher, in the ``reparenting'' of each of Casey's personalities, offer a balancing perspective. Deftly told and studded with striking images, Casey's story--distinguished by her intelligence and courage and by Wilson's unremitting patience and compassion--witnesses equally the power of cruelty and indifference to damage children profoundly, and the capacity of love and hard work to heal. Casey is now a university professor. Literary Guild alternate. (May)
Library Journal
``Oh, Renee, you know that I think integration is secondary to having all the personalities inside feel better about themselves,'' said therapist Wilson. One of numerous unique personalities, female and male, embodied in a single, 26-year-old woman, ``Renee'' once again felt reassured by her therapist's words. Roughly a year and a half had passed since the troubled Casey first telephoned Wilson. A social worker with 20 years' experience, Wilson had never treated a case of multiple personality disorder (MPD). Casey had seen other therapists, but with little result. Wilson read the theoretical literature on MPD; she reread Corbett H. Thigpen and Hervey M. Cleckley's The Three Faces of Eve ( LJ 2/15/57) and Flora Rheta Schreiber's Sybil ( LJ 7/73). She consulted Cornelia Wilbur, the doctor who had treated Sybil. But ultimately Wilson depended on her own clinical and parenting instincts. Unorthodox and unconventional, her treatment brought to light a history of emotional and sexual abuse, a hallmark of MPD. The autobiography is interspersed with Wilson's case notes and diary entries. By turns thrilling, tedious, saddening, and inspiring, the book will engage almost anyone who enjoys a good love story. Literary Guild alternate.--Marlene Charnizon, New York

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780449907320
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/28/1992
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
487,989
Product dimensions:
5.13(w) x 7.99(h) x 0.68(d)

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