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The Florida Cookbook: From Gulf Coast Gumbo to Key Lime Pie--Kca Pbk
     

The Florida Cookbook: From Gulf Coast Gumbo to Key Lime Pie--Kca Pbk

by Jeanne Voltz, Caroline Stuart
 

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A generous and delicious sampling (more than 200 recipes) of the cooking of Florida, along with an entertaining excurison into the land where the story of American food began and where today one can find the most interesting culinary diversity in the U.S.A.

Jeanne Voltz and Caroline Stuart take us through all six areas of Florida: the Northeast (for

Overview

A generous and delicious sampling (more than 200 recipes) of the cooking of Florida, along with an entertaining excurison into the land where the story of American food began and where today one can find the most interesting culinary diversity in the U.S.A.

Jeanne Voltz and Caroline Stuart take us through all six areas of Florida: the Northeast (for Oyster Roasts, Smoked Beans, Peanut Butter Pie); the Panhandle (Shrimp Stuffed Eggplant, Cheese Grits, Blackberry Dumplings); the Space Coast, Gold Coast, and the Keys (Conch Salad, Broiled Yellowtail with Orange Butter); the Big Bend and the Sun Coast (Crab Boil, Calabaza Salad, Rum Spanish Flan with Caramelized Oranges); Central Florida (Smothered Rabbit, Greens with Corn Meal Dumplings); and Florida's Great Lake (Frog's Legs, Hoppin' John, Fresh Banana Layer Cake).

Anyone who loves good food will welcome the delightful fare to be found in these pages. And Floridians—newcomers, old-timers, and those just passing through—will discover a wealth of information about where and how to enjoy the riches of land and sea.

With more than 65 photographs and illustrations

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Dispelling the stereotype of Florida as a Disney void or geriatric Levittown, Voltz ( Barbecued Ribs and Other Great Feeds ) and Stuart, southerners both, offer an entertaining overview of a cuisine that has ``more ethnic diversity than any in America, and possibly the world.'' Dividing Florida into six regions, they illustrate the character of each through recipes and vignettes. Interspersed between instructions for the Spanish-, French- and African American-influenced foods of the Panhandle, like boiled peanuts and smothered quail, are tales of Gulf Coast oysters and cockfighting in Pensacola. Like all cookbooks consorting with native kitchens and restaurants, this book is a voyeur's delight. Its recipes tickle readers with imaginary viewings of local legendary feats--building the titanic Greek salad at the Louis Pappas Restaurant in Tarpon Springs--and also treat us to the more homespun: throwing together a mess of pineapple coleslaw at barbecues for Florida rodeo riders. Although the book lacks the singular voice that could imbue this kind of collection with emotional meaning, its precision and comprehensiveness make it a valuable historical document, reminiscent of the WPA guides of the 1930s. Photos not seen by PW. (Feb.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780394589930
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
02/02/1993
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
393
Product dimensions:
7.05(w) x 10.10(h) x 1.34(d)

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Read an Excerpt

Rum Spanish Flan with Caramelized Oranges
Makes 8 to 10 servings

There's no contest for the top dessert of Spanish Florida: baked caramel custard unmolded to show its golden crown. The rule in a Spanish kitchen that you can't use too many eggs makes a flan that stands up handsomely, and is easier to work with than a crème caramel, which may be so creamy that it relaxes on the plate. Nuns in the first mission in St. Augustine probably brought this style of dessert to Florida almost 450 years ago. Latter-day Hispanics brough their versions from the Caribbean and Europe. A Florida flan has a velvety texture and can be cut in pretty slices. The caramelized oranges with it are a new wrinkle, and a good one. Flan usually is served as is with a bit of the caramel spooned over it.

Custard
1 2/3 cups sugar
3 tablespoons water
8 large eggs Pinch salt
2 12-ounce cans evaporated milk
2 tablespoons dark rum

Caramelized Oranges
1 large orange, peeled and sliced 1/4 inch thick
1 cup sugar
1/3 cup water
1 tablespoon dark rum

Butter a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan. Place the 2/3 cup sugar in a large heavy skillet and stir over moderate heat until it turns golden. Work out any lumps, taking care not to let the sugar burn. Stir in the water with a long-handled spoon (the hot syrup will splatter). Cook, stirring, a minute or two, until blended. Pour into the prepared loaf pan, tilt the pan to coat the sides and bottom, and set aside.

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Place a baking dish large enough to hold the loaf pan in the oven. Pour hot water to a depth of 1/2 inch into the baking dish. In a medium-size bowl, beat the eggs with the remaining 1 cup sugar until blended. Add the salt and stir in the undiluted evaporated milk and the rum. Mix will and pour over the caramel in the loaf pan. Place the loaf pan in the baking dish with the water in the oven. Bake 1 1/2 hours, or until a table knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Remove the pan from the water bath and cool the custard, then chill it overnight or for at least 8 hours.

Meanwhile, prepare the oranges. Cut the orange slices crosswise into half circles. Place the sugar and water in a large heavy skillet. Cook and stir over moderate heat until golden brown. Add the oranges to the hot caramel. Using tongs or a spatula, turn to coat them with the caramel. If the caramel sticks, stir in a bit more water. Sprinkle with the rum and cool the mixture.

To turn out the flan, loosen it around the edges with a thin-bladed knife, invert a platter over the pan, and invert it quickly, so as not to lose any of the caramel; lift off the loaf pan. Garnish the platter with the caramelized oranges or pass them seperately. Slice the flan to serve. Refrigerate any leftovers and serve within a day or two.

Meet the Author

Jeanne Voltz was born in Collinsville, Alabama. She was for many years the food editor at Woman's Day magazine, and she edited the food pages at the Los Angeles Times and the Miami Herald. She is the author of several cookbooks, including The Flavor of the South and Barbecued Ribs, Smoked Butts, and Other Great Feeds—which is also part of the Knopf Cooks American series—is a six-time winner of the Vesta Award for newspaper food editing and writing and has also won numerous other feature and food writing awards. Mrs. Voltz lives with her husband in Pittsboro, North Carolina, where she is a food consultant, writer, and free-lance editor.

Caroline Stuart is a third-generation Floridian whose family settled in the central part of the state in the 1870s. She spent her childhood on a ranch where her father grew citrus and raised cattle. She graduated from the University of Alabama and began her career as a caterer. She then worked for several years with James Beard as his assistant and is now a member of the executive board of the James Beard Foundation. Mrs. Stuart is a contributing editor and restaurant critic for Hudson Valley magazine, as well as a freelance writer and cooking teacher. She lives with her husband, John Brainard, in Greenwich, Connecticut, and has two sons.

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