Florida's Ghostly Legends and Haunted Folklore: North Florida and St. Augustine

Florida's Ghostly Legends and Haunted Folklore: North Florida and St. Augustine

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by Greg Jenkins
     
 

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Discover the haunts of northern Florida in this second volume in the series dedicated to uncovering the uncanny in the Sunshine State. Explore abandoned hospitals, ancient springs, and modern apartment complexes from Ocala to Jacksonville, from Lake City to Tallahassee. Encounter playful spirits and frightening specters and learn their tales of lost love and watery

Overview

Discover the haunts of northern Florida in this second volume in the series dedicated to uncovering the uncanny in the Sunshine State. Explore abandoned hospitals, ancient springs, and modern apartment complexes from Ocala to Jacksonville, from Lake City to Tallahassee. Encounter playful spirits and frightening specters and learn their tales of lost love and watery tombs, of lives cut tragically short and souls lingering through eternity. And unearth stories of darker phenomena that have yet to be explained. . . . Plus, take an exciting tour through ancient St. Augustine, America’s oldest city—and perhaps its most haunted, too. See the ghosts of Spanish soldiers in a centuries-old fort; watch for the light of a spirited bootlegging widow on the roof of a quaint inn; and feel the presence of Henry Flagler (and his unhappy lovers) in the school that bears his name. Delve into the unknown with Greg Jenkins as he examines the history, legend, and paranormal rationale behind strange occurrences in many of north Florida’s haunted locations. Get a fresh look at some of the state’s most infamous specters and learn never-before-heard tales of the strange and the supernatural as you take a trip through Haunted Florida. The first volume of Florida’s Ghostly Legends and Haunted Folklore, covering south and central Florida, is also available.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781561643288
Publisher:
Pineapple Press, Inc.
Publication date:
02/28/2005
Pages:
186
Sales rank:
1,179,049
Product dimensions:
8.34(w) x 9.04(h) x 0.61(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Greg Jenkins is the author of the three-volume series Florida's Ghostly Legends and Haunted Folklore, as well as Chronicles of the Strange and Uncanny in Florida. Since an early age, Greg has had a profound interest in the supernatural and fringe science, and after a personal experience with the unknown in 1987, he embarked on a journey into the realms of parapsychology and all things mysterious. A mental health counselor and case manager, Greg is also a folklorist and collector of oral traditions and urban legends. He is an associate member of England's Society for Psychical Research and the founder of the Florida Psychical Research Group.

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Florida's Ghostly Legends and Haunted Folklore: North Florida and St. Augustine 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Greengardens More than 1 year ago
This is a great book! I've been a part of ghost related research for over 30 years, starting with the New York University group back in the 60s. I have been living in Jacksonville, Florida since the early 1980s and know of many of the locations spoken of in Mr. Jenkins' book on north Florida haunted places. I know for a fact that the author did his research because I had the pleasure of meeting him at an interview in Jax back in 2007. He knows his subject, and has related things only a real ghost hunter would know, not only because of his writing, but because of is photos and video presentations he shows. I also had the opportunity to join him and a ghost research group from Daytona while investigating the Casa marina Hotel, and School four. He knows his stuff. I love his books, and his last one from Pinapple press about bigfoots and flying saucers. It's a fun and weird book.
CatherineD More than 1 year ago
This is one of the books in which the author gathered information from dubious sources and did not bother to check his facts. I attended Flagler College and every story he told about the school "spirits" was completely wrong. It is as though he interviewed someone who decided to feed him a ration of baloney and he swallowed it hook, line and sinker. In his chapter on Flagler, he accused Henry Flagler of being a womanizer even though the only times he was known to have taken a mistress was when Ida Alice became hopelessly insane. The spirit of the woman who allegedly hanged herself on the fourth floor was the mistress of another man, not of Henry Flagler. The author then says the ghost most often seen at Flagler is the "Blue Lady," but this isn't true either, the most often seen and talked about ghost is the "Lady in White," the name generally given to the ghost of Ida Alice Flagler. The author also includes a chapter on the Casa Monica Hotel, but, apparently, he did not interview anyone who worked in the building when it was serving as the St. Johns County Courthouse, when most of the ghostly activity was reported. I worked in the courthouse and I was very disappointed the author did such a poor job on this chapter. After the book was published, I heard from various sources that in addition to failing to research the locations in his book, the author made a lot of false claims about himself, as well. Specifically, on the back cover of the book, he claims to be a "mental health counselor," yet, I have heard that he is not licensed by the State of Florida as a counselor. This is something the publisher should have checked before putting it on the back of a book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Some people think Dr. Jenkins is one of those wacky Ghost buster want-a-bes, but he¿s not. He is a part of the UKs psychic organization, and he teaches folklore. But, he¿s a down-to-earth licensed psychologist and addictions specialist, so he no nut job like many of these people turn out to be. I heard him lecture at the Blanche Hotel in Lake City early this year, so I know how he speaks. He also de-bunked a phony psychic want-a-be named Sheila V. out of Orlando, so I know he doesn¿t believe every story that come along. Overall, this is a pretty damn good book, and it entertains. Try watching Haunted Histories on the History Channel...his stuff is a lot like that, only in book form. Jennifer
Guest More than 1 year ago
Having been a ghost hunter for many years, I can usually tell from a book whether or not the author is writing from actual experience or word of mouth. Obviously, this author, however well-versed he may be, did not actally experience any of the hauntings he wrote about and took much of his information from other sources. I doubt very much if much of this book is valid and would hesitate to recommend it. It sounds more like fiction than fact.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I though the first volume was great, and this one follows the same tradition. North Florida and St. Augustine are covered in this book, and the legends are fun and new. This book, like the first is more like a tour guide than just a book on ghost stories...It makes you want to go there. Also, these two books have a lot extra in the back. Subjects like 'Tools of the Ghost Hunter' and 'Ghost Tours and Walks' offer a grand departure from the run-of-the-mill book on ghosts and hauntings. Great stuff!