Overview

A bright, science-minded boy goes to the beach equipped to collect and examine flotsam--anything floating that has been washed ashore. Bottles, lost toys, small objects of every description are among his usual finds. But there's no way he could have prepared for one particular discovery: a barnacle-encrusted underwater camera, with its own secrets to share . . . and to keep.

Each of David Wiesner's amazing picture books has revealed ...
See more details below
Flotsam

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK Kids for iPad

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$8.49
BN.com price
(Save 15%)$9.99 List Price

Overview

A bright, science-minded boy goes to the beach equipped to collect and examine flotsam--anything floating that has been washed ashore. Bottles, lost toys, small objects of every description are among his usual finds. But there's no way he could have prepared for one particular discovery: a barnacle-encrusted underwater camera, with its own secrets to share . . . and to keep.

Each of David Wiesner's amazing picture books has revealed the magical possibilities of some ordinary thing or happening--a frog on a lily pad, a trip to the Empire State Building, a well-known nursery tale. In this Caldecott Medal winner, a day at the beach is the springboard into a wildly imaginative exploration of the mysteries of the deep, and of the qualities that enable us to witness these wonders and delight in them.

Winner of the 2007 Caldecott Medal

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
Though wordless, this intriguing book is a storytelling marvel. With stunning, meticulously painted watercolors, award-winning Wiesner tells the fanciful tale of a young boy who discovers an old-fashioned camera washed up on the beach. The developed film reveals fantastical underwater shots, including octopi reading in armchairs and elaborate cities built of seashells. Children will savor the magic of this surreal underwater world and the book's mind-bending conclusion. (Ages 4 to 6)
Child magazine's Best Children's Book Awards 2006
Publishers Weekly
Two-time Caldecott winner Wiesner (Tuesday; The Three Pigs) crafts another wordless mystery, this one set on an ordinary beach and under an enchanted sea. A saucerlike fish's eye stares from the exact center of the dust jacket, and the fish's scarlet skin provides a knockout background color. First-timers might not notice what's reflected in its eye, but return visitors will: it's a boxy camera, drifting underwater with a school of slim green fish. In the opening panels, Wiesner pictures another close-up eye, this one belonging to a blond boy viewing a crab through a magnifying glass. Visual devices binoculars and a microscope in a plastic bag rest on a nearby beach towel, suggesting the boy's optical curiosity. After being tossed by a wave, the studious boy finds a barnacle-covered apparatus on the sand (evocatively labeled the "Melville Underwater Camera"). He removes its roll of film and, when he gets the results, readers see another close-up of his wide-open, astonished eye: the photos depict bizarre undersea scenes (nautilus shells with cutout windows, walking starfish-islands, octopi in their living room la Tuesday's frogs). A lesser fantasist would end the story here, but Wiesner provides a further surprise that connects the curious boy with others like him. Masterfully altering the pace with panel sequences and full-bleed spreads, he fills every inch of the pages with intricate, imaginative watercolor details. New details swim into focus with every rereading of this immensely satisfying excursion. Ages 5-8. (Sept.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz
A budding young scientist has brought his magnifying glass, binoculars, and microscope to the beach. As his parents relax, he begins to explore even before the title page. On the double-spread title page is an exhibition of some of the flotsam to be found. Then the wordless story of his investigations begins. We are sucked in immediately by Wiesner's photorealistic images and the fashion in which they are presented. Double-page scenes show us the sweep of the ocean beach. A waterproof camera washes up in front of him, and in several varying sized rectangular scenes we see his vain attempts to discover the owner. A trip to the photo shop with the roll of film produces for him scenes of magical underwater life. There is also a photo of a young girl holding a packet of photos of other youngsters. Puzzling over this leads to examination under the magnifying glass and eventually the microscope. There he moves to further and further magnification of the pictures inside the pictures each child is holding, as the magnification rises to 70x and the scenes go back in time. Our hero thinks, then takes his own picture with the camera holding the other photos, and returns the camera to the undersea world. Finally it is washed ashore where a young girl reaches toward it, and the tale can go on. Mystery and humor combine in the watercolors that fascinate and stimulate further imagination. Note the different jacket and cover.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-A wave deposits an old-fashioned contraption at the feet of an inquisitive young beachcomber. It's a "Melville underwater camera," and the excited boy quickly develops the film he finds inside. The photos are amazing: a windup fish, with intricate gears and screwed-on panels, appears in a school with its living counterparts; a fully inflated puffer, outfitted as a hot-air balloon, sails above the water; miniature green aliens kowtow to dour-faced sea horses; and more. The last print depicts a girl, holding a photo of a boy, and so on. As the images become smaller, the protagonist views them through his magnifying glass and then his microscope. The chain of children continues back through time, ending with a sepia image of a turn-of-the-20th-century boy waving from a beach. After photographing himself holding the print, the youngster tosses the camera back into the ocean, where it makes its way to its next recipient. This wordless book's vivid watercolor paintings have a crisp realism that anchors the elements of fantasy. Shifting perspectives, from close-ups to landscape views, and a layout incorporating broad spreads and boxed sequences, add drama and motion to the storytelling and echo the photographic theme. Filled with inventive details and delightful twists, each snapshot is a tale waiting to be told. Pair this visual adventure with Wiesner's other works, Chris Van Allsburg's titles, or Barbara Lehman's The Red Book (Houghton, 2004) for a mind-bending journey of imagination.-Joy Fleishhacker, School Library Journal Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
From arguably the most inventive and cerebral visual storyteller in children's literature, comes a wordless invitation to drift with the tide, with the story, with your eyes, with your imagination. A boy at the beach picks up a barnacle-encrusted underwater camera. He develops the film, which produces, first, pictures of a surreal undersea world filled with extraordinary details (i.e., giant starfish bestride the sea carrying mountainous islands on their backs), and then a portrait of a girl holding a picture of a boy holding a picture of another boy . . . and so on . . . and on. Finally, the boy needs a microscope to reveal portraits of children going back in time to a sepia portrait of a turn-of-the-century lad in knickers. The boy adds his own self-portrait to the others, casts the camera back into the waves, and it is carried by a sea creature back to its fantastic depths to be returned as flotsam for another child to find. In Wiesner's much-honored style, the paintings are cinematic, coolly restrained and deliberate, beguiling in their sibylline images and limned with symbolic allusions. An invitation not to be resisted. (Picture book. 6-11)
From the Publisher
"Wiesner offers another exceptional, wordless picture book that finds wild magic in quiet, everyday settings." Booklist, ALA, Starred Review

"New details swim into focus with every rereading of this immensely satisfying excursion." Publishers Weekly, Starred

"A mind-bending journey of imagination." School Library Journal, Starred

"In Wiesner's much-honored style, the paintings are cinematic, coolly restrained and deliberate...An invitation not to be resisted." Kirkus Reviews, Starred

"Wiesner's detailed watercolors make the absurd wonderfully believable...and children will surely love 'Flotsam' from start to finish." New York Times Book Review Notable Book

"The meticulous and rich detail of Wiesner's watercolors makes the fantasy involving and convincing." Horn Book

"Wiesner continues to show children that things aren't always what they seem. Would the Caldecott committee consider a three-peat?" Bookpage

"Wiesner returns with his traditional wordless-narrative format for another fantastical outing." Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780547759302
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 9/4/2006
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 238,304
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • File size: 8 MB

Meet the Author

David Wiesner

David Wiesner's interest in visual storytelling dates back to high school days when he made silent movies and drew wordless comic books. Born and raised in Bridgewater, New Jersey, he graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in Illustration. While a student, he created a painting nine feet long, which he now recognizes as the genesis of Free Fall, his first book of his own authorship, for which he was awarded a Caldecott Honor Medal in 1989. David won his first Caldecott Medal in 1992 for Tuesday, and he has gone on to win twice more: in 2002 for The Three Pigs and in 2007 for Flotsam. He is only the second person in the award’s history to win the Caldecott Medal three times. David and his wife, Kim Kahng, and their two children live near Philadelphia, where he devotes full time to illustration and she pursues her career as a surgeon.

Biography

David Wiesner's interest in visual storytelling dates back to high school days when he made silent movies and drew wordless comic books. Born and raised in Bridgewater, New Jersey, he graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in Illustration. While a student, he created a painting nine feet long, which he now recognizes as the genesis of Free Fall, his first book of his own authorship, for which he was awarded a Caldecott Honor Medal in 1989.

David won his first Caldecott Medal in 1992 for Tuesday, and has gone on to win twice more: in 2002 for The Three Pigs and in 2007 for Flotsam. In addition writing and illustrating his own picture books, he has illustrated stories for many other children's authors.

Good To Know

  • At a young age, he created wordless comic books such as Slop the Wonder Pig and silent movies like his kung-fu vampire film The Saga of Butcula.

  • As an undergraduate at Rhode Island School of Design, he met two mentors: Tom Sgouros and David Macaulay who taught him the fundamentals of illustration and fostered his creative imagination. He dedicated Tuesday to Sgouros and The Three Pigs to Macaulay.

  • Wiesner is a three-time Caldecott winner and only the second person in the award's long history to claim that distinction.
  • Read More Show Less
      1. Hometown:
        Outside Philadelphia, P.A.
      1. Date of Birth:
        February 5, 1956
      2. Place of Birth:
        Bridgewater, NJ
      1. Education:
        Rhode Island School of Design -- BFA in Illustration.
      2. Website:

    Customer Reviews

    Average Rating 4.5
    ( 29 )
    Rating Distribution

    5 Star

    (22)

    4 Star

    (3)

    3 Star

    (3)

    2 Star

    (0)

    1 Star

    (1)

    Your Rating:

    Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

    Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

    Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

    Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

    We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

    What to exclude from your review:

    Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

    Reviews should not contain any of the following:

    • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
    • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
    • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
    • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
    • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
    • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
    • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

    Reminder:

    • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
    • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
    • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
    Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

    Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

    Create a Pen Name

    Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

     
    Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

    Continue Anonymously
    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 Customer Reviews
    • Posted April 13, 2009

      A Story without Words - Let's Your Child Write It Themselves

      This book ONLY contains pictures of a little boy's discoveries on a trip to the seashore. He discovers many different items. YOUR child, whether they can read, or not, is left with trying to "tell the story" in his/her own words. As a parent you can help them along, but I wouldn't interrupt "their" storytelling - they are "reading" to YOU. And everytime they "read" this book, they will tell you a very different story!

      2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 30, 2007

      Review

      David Wiesner won the Caldecott Medal in 2006 for Flotsam. He has received the Caldecott Medal twice, for Tuesday and The Three Pigs, and two Caldecott Honors, for Sector 7 and Free Fall. He is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, and lives near Philadelphia with his wife, Kim Kahng, and their children, Kevin and Jaime. Flotsam is something that floats. In the book Flotsam, a young boy is playing on the beach and something washes up. After he begins to investigate, he discovers a camera that is used under water. He takes the film to be developed, and discovers all the interesting sea life. He also discovers that he is not the only child to find the camera, so he loads the camera with film for the next child who is out looking for treasures on the beach.

      2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted December 19, 2009

      more from this reviewer

      A Stunning Gift book - even for yourself!

      Mr Wiesner's wordless book tells a most eloquent story, filled with whimsy and plain fine storytelling. In brief (and no spoiler, I think) it's about a young boy at the beach with his family who finds a camera washed up by a big wave. He discovers that there is film (!) in it, and with his folks' permission he takes it to a one-hour developer. The sequence of illustrations in which he's waiting the hour is nothing short of brilliant. The rest of the story - and the book - is his discovery of the pictures. I looked through the whole book - then bought it (immediately!); since bringing it home I've enjoyed it many more times finding new delights each time. It's appropriate for children (even ones too young to read but able to comprehend the sequences) and adults. I mean to give it as a gift to two children and several adults. Check it out! Might I add: the original copy I bought? It's MINE.

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 15, 2013

      This book is an excellent read. I especially love reading it usi

      This book is an excellent read. I especially love reading it using a document camera, which allows me to zoom in and out on the fabulous illustrations.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted July 28, 2012

      Mia

      I have not read the book it would be nice to have a sapel.

      0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted January 2, 2010

      gift to the grandkids

      the grandkids said cool.I say it is pretty to look at and fun to use imagination.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted July 19, 2009

      more from this reviewer

      I Also Recommend:

      Beautiful

      I love this book. There are no words, it's all pictures but it is beautifully done. It is an excellent book for both children and adults of any language. It follows the path of a camera with which photographs are taken of whom ever finds the camera. They take a picture of themselves holding the picture of the last person to find the camera. When closely examined you can see photos inside photos going back through time.

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted February 18, 2008

      Rediscovering our Imagination

      In his beautifully and magnificently illustrated Flotsam, David Wiesner gives his ¿readers¿ a wonderful gift: imagination. This wordless, picture book tells the story of a young boy discovering flotsam (trash and other unwanted items washing ashore) and happens upon a camera that gives him a glimpse into an unexplored world, the sea. The combination of dark and light watercolor helps create the feeling of uncharted waters deep below, and the fascinating images allow the imagination of children and adults alike to run wild on every page. Every carefully detailed illustration provides a smaller story within the larger plot of ¿Flotsam¿. With each pass your eyes take over the layers and various elements within the watercolor pages, you will wonder as they wander and, if you allow yourself to let go, dream with Wiesner and his curious young boy who learns the importance of sharing the deep secret and skills of curiosity, purpose, discovery, and imagination.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 2, 2007

      Flotsam

      Flotsam This book is about a boy who goes to the beach ready to examine anything Flotsam (anything that washes ashore). The main item that the boy finds is a water camera. So the bright-minded young boy goes and gets the film developed. He finds some amazing pictures of the underwater world. Even some pictures of other girls and boys who had found the camera and took a picture of themselves and tossed it back in to the ocean. Read the book to find out what the bright young boy will do after he finds the camera and the pictures. Wiesner, David. Flotsam. New York: Clarion, 2006.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 22, 2007

      Flotsam

      David Wiesner has managed to win the Caldecott again. This makes his third win of the Caldecott award. He shares this honor with only one other person, Marcia Brown. In his newest Caldecott winner, Flotsam, Wiesner tells his story of a young boy at the beach with no words. The pictures say it all. A young boy finds an underwater camera and has the film developed. He finds a group of pictures that show all the life of the sea. He is amazed at the pictures especially the last picture. This book allows the reader to expand their mind and make their own story. Every reader will have a different experience with this book. I agree with this book winning the medal. The pictures are very vibrant and detailed. There are endless possibilities between the covers of Flotsam. Wiesner, David. Flotsam. New York. Clarion Books, 2006. Reading Level Not Listed

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 22, 2007

      Flotsam- David Wiesner

      An ordinary day at the beach turns into something wonderful. A little boy is looking at all the different types of creatures when something washes up on the shore. It is a underwater camera. What kind a wonders can be found with the camera? What magic is with in this camera? Where did it comefrom? Read and you will find out. Wiesner the winner of the 2007 Caldecott winner and a wonderful book. This no word book is beautifully illustrated. Ideally to use for 5-8 years old. Wiesner, David. FLOTSAM. New York: Clarion, 2006

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 20, 2007

      a great picture book

      Wiesner David, Flotsoam, jackets illustration ,2006 As a child growing up in suburban New Jersey, Wiesner re-created his world daily in his imagination. His home and his neighborhood became anything from a faraway planet to a prehistoric jungle. When the everyday play stopped, he would follow his imaginary playmates into the pages of books, wandering among dinosaurs in the World Book Encyclopedia. The images before him generated a love of detail, an admiration for the creative process, and a curiosity about the hand behind the drawings. Wiesner has always been intrigued by and curious about what comes before and after the captured image. His books somehow convey the sequence of thoughts leading up to and following each picture, and that quality explain why they are frequently described as cinematic. David Wiesner has illustrated more than twenty award-winning books for young readers. Two of the picture books he both wrote and illustrated became instant classics when they won the prestigious Caldecott Medal: Tuesday in 1992 and The Three Pigs in 2002. Two of his other titles, Sector 7 and Free Fall, are Caldecott Honor Books. An exhibit of Wiesner's original artwork, 'Seeing the Story,' toured the United States in 2000 and 2001. Among his many honors, Wiesner holds the Japan Picture Book Award for Tuesday, the Prix Sorcières (the French equivalent of the Caldecott Medal) for The Three Pigs, and a 2004 IBBY Honor Book nomination for illustration, also for The Three Pigs. Flotsam, his most recent work, was a New York Times bestseller and was recently named winner of the 2007 Caldecott Medal, making Wiesner only the second person in the award¿s long history to have won three times. This is a wonderfully colored picture book. It portrays a boy who finds a camera and finds out it is more then what it appears to be. It is magical and holds pictures of the past. Every child who has held the camera is seen in the pictures. Along with mystical pictures of what happens under the sea. There are mechanical fish and turtles with cities on top of their shells. It show the sea life to me magical and different that what we see. I thought this was a wonderful book. I loved that fun and magical character it held. It allows you to enter another world that you could never imagine. It holds great details and promotes imagination. It would be a fun way to introduce a aquatic life project or lesson. You could have children look at the book and write their own story to enhance writing skills and imagination.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 5, 2007

      What an Amazing Book

      My seven year old daughter just brought this book home from her school library. For a book with no words, it speaks to a child's imagination in huge letters. I was so taken with it that I came online to order one for her to keep. I will definitely be giving this book as a gift to teachers and friends of my daughter. It's a good book to teach prediction. If you love fantasy, you'll love this wonderful book.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted March 27, 2007

      What a Discovery!

      The book ¿Flotsam¿ was published in 2006 by David Wiesner and won the Caldecott Medal this present year. Wiesner was born in Bridgewater, New Jersey and graduated from Rhode Island of Design. He has also won two other Caldecott Medals, one for his book ¿Tuesday¿ and another for his book ¿Free Fall.¿ The book, ¿Flotsam¿ is about an average boy who is spending an ordinary day at a beach. While looking at different creatures on the beach, he discovers a flotsam, which is floating debris. It turns out to be an underwater camera. As soon as the boy discovers that the camera has film in it, he immediately runs to get the film developed. He waited, and waited, and waited¿ finally the film was developed! What kind of pictures do you think the boy saw when he got the pictures back? I have to say, this book definitely requires no text to be enjoyable. Each picture says enough. Not only does this book have a good handling of beautiful, assorted colors, but the images in the book are fantastic. A child¿s imagination will extend when he or she looks through this book. This book definitely deserved to win the Caldecott Medal for its marvelous illustrations. I give it two thumbs up! This book is suitable for ages 5-8. Wiesner, David. Flotsam. New York: Clarion Books, 2006.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted March 5, 2007

      An Ordinary Day at the Beach

      David Wiesner does it again with this book. No text is necessary in this nautical adventure. An average boy is spending an average day at the beach until he makes a discovery, flotsam, something that floats. The boy discovers a camera, an underwater camera. He takes out the film, and has it developed to discover an incredible world of wonder captured by the camera. Your eyes will wander all over the wondrous illustrations looking at islands on the backs of starfish, cities on turtle shells, or what an octopus's living room may look like. The final picture leaves our boy with only one option. David Wiesner is a three time Caldecott winner, and he has enjoyed the ocean with his family all of his life. This book will give your imagination a platform to dive from, enjoy! Wiesner, David.'Flotsam'.New York:Clarion Books,2006. For Ages 5-8

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted March 1, 2007

      Wow

      Just incredibly magical. Wonderful wonderful wonderful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted February 19, 2007

      I Loved It, It Was So Good!

      It's so good! It was because they kept on switching cameras. There were big monsters in the sea. They were switching the camera too!

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted February 25, 2007

      Instant Classic

      I loved this book when I first opened it. I was struck by the wonderful artwork. There are no words in this book, but the emotion on the character's face is so expressive that words really aren't necessary. My 4 yr old son enjoys this book very much and I enjoy reading it to him. Can't wait to share this with his cousins too. I believe this will be a classic like Maurice Sendak's 'Where the Wild Things Are'.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted February 2, 2007

      Can't wait to share this one!

      I can hardly wait to share this one with my grandchldren They love the beach, and will love this story. Awesomepictures awesome story!

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted February 6, 2013

      No text was provided for this review.

    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 Customer Reviews

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)