Flour and Breads and Their Fortification in Health and Disease Prevention

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Overview

Bread and flour-based foods are an important part of the diet for millions of people worldwide. Their complex nature provides energy, protein, minerals and many other macro- and micronutrients. However, consideration must be taken of three major aspects related to flour and bread. The first is that not all cultures consume bread made from wheat flour. There are literally dozens of flour types, each with their distinctive heritage, cultural roles and nutritive contents. Second, not all flours are used to make leavened bread in the traditional (i.e., Western) loaf form. There are many different ways that flours are used in the production of staple foods. Third, flour and breads provide a suitable means for fortification: either to add components that are removed in the milling and purification process or to add components that will increase palatability or promote health and reduce disease per se.

Flour and Breads and their Fortification in Health and Disease Prevention provides a single-volume reference to the healthful benefits of a variety of flours and flour products, and guides the reader in identifying options and opportunities for improving health through flour and fortified flour products.

Examines those flour and bread related agents that affect metabolism and other health-related conditions.

Explores the impact of compositional differences between flours, including differences based on country of origin and processing technique.

Includes methods for analysis of flours and bread-related compounds in other foods.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780123808868
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
  • Publication date: 1/15/2011
  • Pages: 542
  • Product dimensions: 8.70 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Professor Victor R. Preedy, PhD DSc CBiol FIBiol FRCPath FRIPH FRSH FRSPH is currently a Professor in the Department of Dietetics, King's College London and Honorary Professor in Clinical Biochemistry, King's College Hospital and Director of the Genomics Centre, Kings College London. He directs studies regarding nutrition, and clinical biochemistry. Professor Preedy graduated in 1974 from the University of Aston with a Combined Honours Degree in Biology and Physiology with Pharmacology. He gained his PhD in 1981, in the field of Nutrition and Metabolism, from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London. Between 1988 until 1999 he was associated with the Department of Clinical Biochemistry at King’s College Hospital. He was a Reader in Clinical Biochemistry between 1992 and 2002. In 1992, he received his Membership of the Royal College of Pathologists, based on his published works and in 1993 he gained a DSc degree for his outstanding contribution to protein metabolism. At the time, he was one of the university's youngest recipients of this distinguished award. Professor Preedy was elected as a Fellow to the Royal College of Pathologists in 2000. Since then he has been elected as a Fellow to the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health (2004), The Royal Institute of Public Health (2004) and The Royal Society of Public Health (2009). Professor Preedy has published over 550 articles, which includes over 160 peer-reviewed manuscripts based on original research and 90 reviews as well as 35 books or volumes.

Ronald Ross Watson, Ph.D., attended the University of Idaho but graduated from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, with a degree in chemistry in 1966. He earned his Ph.D. in biochemistry from Michigan State University in 1971. His postdoctoral schooling in nutrition and microbiology was completed at the Harvard School of Public Health, where he gained 2 years of postdoctoral research experience in immunology and nutrition.

From 1973 to 1974 Dr. Watson was assistant professor of immunology and performed research at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson. He was assistant professor of microbiology and immunology at the Indiana University Medical School from 1974 to 1978 and associate professor at Purdue University in the Department of Food and Nutrition from 1978 to 1982. In 1982 Dr. Watson joined the faculty at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in the Department of Family and Community Medicine of the School of Medicine. He is currently professor of health promotion sciences in the Mel and Enid Zuckerman Arizona College of Public Health.

Dr. Watson is a member of national and international nutrition, immunology, cancer, and alcoholism research societies. His patents are for antioxidant polyphenols in several dietary supplements including passion fruit peel extract, with more pending. This results from more than 10 years of polyphenol research in animal models and human clinical trials. He had done research on mouse AIDS and immune function for 20 years. For 30 years he was funded by NIH and Foundations to study dietary supplements in health promotion. Dr. Watson has edited more than 0 books on nutrition, dietary supplements and over-the-counter agents, and drugs of abuse, as scientific reference books. He has published more than 500 research and review articles.

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Table of Contents

Preface; Section I: Introductory Chapters, Flours and Breads; The science of doughs and bread quality; Monitoring flour performance in bread making; South Indian parotta - an unleavened, flat bread; Sourdough breads; Focaccia Italian flat fatty bread: quality and technology; Flour and bread from black, purple and blue-colored wheats; Emmer (Triticum turgidum spp. dicoccum) flour and breads; Einkorn (Triticum monococcum) flour and bread; Maize: Composition, bioactive constituents and unleavened bread; Amaranth: Potential source for flour enrichment; Quinoa: Protein and non protein tryptophan in comparison with other cereal and legume flours and bread; Sorghum Flour and Flour Products: Production, Nutritional Quality and Fortification; Buckwheat flour and bread; Non-starch polysaccharides in maize and oat: ferulated arabinoxylans and b-glucans; Gluten Free Bread: Sensory, physicochemical and nutritional aspects; Dietary fibre from brewer’s spent grain as a functional ingredient in bread making technology; Composite flours and breads: potentials of local crops in developing countries; Legume composite flours and baked goods: Nutritional, functional, sensory and phytochemical quality; Potentials of using okra seed (Abelmoschus esculentus Moench) flour for food fortification and effects of processing; Apricot kernel flour and its use in health; Macadamia Flours: Nutritious Ingredients for Baked Goods; Banana and mango flours; Use of Potato flour in bread and flat bread; Section 2: Fortification of Flours and Breads and their Metabolic Effects; Mineral fortification of whole wheat flour-an overview; Iron particle size in iron-fortified bread; Iodine fortification of bread: experiences from Australia and New Zealand; Phytochemical fortification of flour and bread; Carotenoids in sweetpotato, cassava and maize and their use in bread and flour fortification; Production and nutraceutical properties of breads fortified with DHA and omega-3 containing oils; Fortification with free amino acids affects acrylamide content in yeast-leavened bread; Barley ß-glucans and fiber-rich fractions as functional ingredient in flat and pan breads; Antioxidant activity and phenolics in breads with added barley flour; Bread supplemented with chempedak (Artocarpus integer) seed flour; Effect of starch addition to fluid dough during breadmaking process; Fermentation as a tool to improve healthy properties of bread; Apple pomace (by-product of apple juice industry) as a flour fortification strategy; Use of sweetpotato in bread and flour fortification; Fortification of bread with soy protein to normalize serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels; Dietary breads and impact on postprandial parameters; Fortification of vitamin B-12 to flour and the metabolic response; Metabolic effects of ß-Glucans addition to corn maize flour; Lupin kernel fiber: Metabolic effects in human intervention studies and use as supplement in wheat bread; Metabolic effects of propionic acid-enriched breads; Folic acid and colon cancer. Impact of wheat flour fortification with folic acid; Effects of the soybean flour diet on insulin secretion and action; Metabolic effects of bread fortified with wheat sprouts and bioavailability of ferulic acid from wheat bran

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