Flower Girl

Flower Girl

5.0 1
by Kathy Furgang, Harley Jessup
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Not every girl wants to be a flower girl! While playing hide-and-seek at Grandma's house, Anna overhears a conversation about Aunt Julie's wedding, and learns that she's supposed to be the flower girl. Oh no! There's nothing fun about weddings. Anna would much rather go swimming or ride her bike. But when she follows everyone up to the attic and sees them pulling

Overview

Not every girl wants to be a flower girl! While playing hide-and-seek at Grandma's house, Anna overhears a conversation about Aunt Julie's wedding, and learns that she's supposed to be the flower girl. Oh no! There's nothing fun about weddings. Anna would much rather go swimming or ride her bike. But when she follows everyone up to the attic and sees them pulling out old gowns, veils, and photos, she's enchanted. Anna even begins imagining what her own wedding might be like.

Illustrated in Harley Jessup's bold palette and with his original perspectives, Flower Girl will be a favorite for reading again and again.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
Anna overhears that she is to be a flower girl and takes an instant dislike to the idea. "Furgang skillfully skirts stereotypes and presents a realistic scenario," PW said. "Jessup's spunky compositions capture the full bouquet of Anna's evolving thoughts and emotions." Ages 4-up. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Anna is dismayed to find that her Aunt Julie wants her to be a flower girl in her wedding. What is a delightful tradition handed down from mother to daughter and now to the younger sister seems like a dreadful idea to the granddaughter. She finds weddings a big bore and would much rather ride her bike or go swimming. However, as she eavesdrops on the wedding plans and follows her mother, aunt, and grandmother up to Grandma's attic, her notion of weddings changes. She touches the smooth material of her mother's wedding dress taken out of a big pink box. She looks at the wedding pictures of her grandmother and puts on her long white veil, along with her mother's long white gloves. As her aunt next tries on the gown, veil, and gloves herself, Anna imagines what her own wedding might be like. But when a friend calls for her to come out and play, she joins him. For now, all she will do is be a flower girl. This is a cute introduction to weddings for little girls. The drawings are both humorous and delicate, showing a child's eye view of a feminine ritual. 2002, Viking/Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers
—Carol Raker Collins
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-When Anna overhears that Aunt Julie wants her to be a flower girl in her wedding, she couldn't be more disgusted. She thinks weddings are boring and would rather be riding her bike. But then she follows her mother, aunt, and grandmother to the attic and watches them unpack her mother's wedding dress and her grandmother's veil. Before long, Anna forgets her initial reaction and gets into the spirit of things. By the end of the book, she has completely changed her tune. Furgang's simple story is well told and charmingly illustrated. Jessup's gleeful images convey Anna's rambunctious nature and mercurial disposition while incorporating carefully chosen design elements, like the pink and blue patterns from the boxes in the attic that show up on the endpapers and as backdrops for certain pictures. Just like the boxes, the book has delightful surprises inside.-Catherine Threadgill, Charleston County Public Library, SC Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A little girl has very mixed feelings about this whole wedding idea, but has a lot of fun getting to the point of the flower girl thing. Anna's Aunt Julie is getting married, and wants Anna to be the flower girl. Anna knows weddings are really dull for kids, but when she, her mom, and Aunt Julie go to grandma's house, Anna is entranced by what they find in the attic: grandma's wedding veil and Mama's wedding dress. Aunt Julie tries everything on, and Anna tries on the veil and long gloves-gloves that Mama says "are filled with memories." Anna thinks that maybe being a flower girl won't be so bad and maybe she'll wear Grandma's veil, too, "If I get married." Jessup makes cheery, cozy pictures: Grandma's house, with its front porch, friendly interior, and peaked attic is just right for Anna's warmhearted story. Grandma herself is not very old, as is natural in this setting: she and her daughters and granddaughter share shades of the same russet/strawberry blonde hair. Jessup (Just Enough, 2000, etc.) uses calligraphic outline to sketch the folds of the wedding dress, the beams of the attic ceiling, and the profusion of flowers in the yard, filled in with the colors of a sunny summer day. Like Gary Soto's Snapshots from the Wedding (1997), Furgang, in her first picture book, offers a child's-eye view of a special event with love and spirit. (Picture book. 3-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780142402382
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/21/2005
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.13(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Anna doesn't want to be a flower girl in her Aunt Julie's wedding. She tries to hide in the attic. Her Grandma, Mama, and Aunt Julie go to the attic. Anna comes out and tries on the veil and gloves from her grandma's wedding. She didn't want to be a flower girl, but then changed her mind. In the end, she runs outside to play, and decides it is ok to be a llower girl. I like the pictures.