The Flowers of Evil

The Flowers of Evil

4.1 9
by Charles P. Baudelaire
     
 

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The Flowers of Evil is translated by F. P. Sturm and W. J. Robertson, to include Three Additional Poems and Intimate Papers discovered after the author's death with opinions of the Theater, Faith, Morals, Health, and on. This Edition Includes: The Dance Of Death - The Beacons - The Sadness Of The Moon - The Balcony - The Sick Muse - The Venal Muse - The Evil Monk

Overview

The Flowers of Evil is translated by F. P. Sturm and W. J. Robertson, to include Three Additional Poems and Intimate Papers discovered after the author's death with opinions of the Theater, Faith, Morals, Health, and on. This Edition Includes: The Dance Of Death - The Beacons - The Sadness Of The Moon - The Balcony - The Sick Muse - The Venal Muse - The Evil Monk - The Temptation - The Irreparable - The Former Life - Don Juan In Hades - The Living Flame - Correspondences - The Flask - Reversibility - The Eyes Of Beauty - Sonnet Of Autumn - The Remorse Of The Dead - The Ghost - To A Madonna - The Sky - Spleen - The Owls - Bien Loin D'Ici - Contemplation - The Brown Beggar Maid - The Swan - The Seven Old Men - The Little Old Women - The Madrigal Of Sorrow - Mist And Rain - Sunset - The Corpse - The Allegory - The Accursed - La Beatrice - The Soul Of Wine - The Wine Of Lovers - The Death Of Lovers - The Death Of The Poor - Gypsies Travelling - A Landscape - The Voyage Benediction - Ill Luck - Beauty - Ideal Love - Hymn To Beauty - Exotic Fragrance - Sonnet XVIII - Music - The Spiritual Dawn - The Flawed Bell. Also included: A Carcass - Weeping and Wandering - Lesbos - Rockets (written some ten years before the author's death) - My Heart Laid Bare (the days when he felt the first attacks of the illness that was to bear him off.) These final documents furnish an interesting supplement to the more formal works of the poet, and a valuable contribution to literature.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781603863520
Publisher:
Watchmaker Publishing
Publication date:
06/25/2010
Pages:
120
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.28(d)

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INTRODUCTION

The modern literary spirit was born out of the measured angles so carefully calculated by Laclos. He was the first element discovered by Baudelaire, who was a refined and reasonable explorer from a privileged background, but whose views on modern life contained a particular madness.
Laclos delighted in inspiring the corrupt bubbles that rose from the strange and rich literary mud of the Revolution. Like Diderot, Laclos was the intellectual son of Richardson and Rousseau, and his work was continued by Sade, Restif, Nerciat - some of the most notable philosophical storytellers of the late 18th century. Most of them, in fact, contained the seeds of the modern spirit, and they were poised to create a triumphant new era for arts and letters.
During this nauseating and often brilliant era of Revolution, Baudelaire mingled his spiritualistic poison with the writings of Edgar Allan Poe, a strange American, who had composed, in the poetic field, work which was as disturbing and as marvellous as the work of Laclos.
Baudelaire then is the son of Laclos and Poe. One can easily untangle the influence that each exerted on Baudelaire's prophetic mind and on his work, both so full of originality. As of this year, 1917, when his work enters the public domain, we can not only place him in the front rank of the great French poets, but also award him a place alongside the greatest of universal poets.
The evidence for the influence of the cynical writers of the Revolution on Les Fleurs du Mal can be seen everywhere in Baudelaire's correspondence and in his notes. When he decided to translate and adapt Poe's works, strangely, he found a higher lyricism and moral feeling than he had thought was present in the writings of the marvellous Baltimore drunkard and his prohibited readings.
In the novelists of the Revolution, he had discovered the importance of the question of sex.
From the Anglo-Saxons of the same era, such as de Quincey and Poe, Baudelaire had learned that there were artificial paradises. Their methodical exploration - supported by Reason, the revolutionary goddess - enabled him to reach the lyrical heights towards which the mad American predicants had directed Poe, their contemporary. But Reason blinded him, and he abandoned it as soon as he had reached the heights.
Baudelaire then is the son of Laclos and Edgar Allan Poe, but a son who is blind and insane...

What People are saying about this

Norma Cole
"This is the Baudelaire translation for our time--and for all time. Relentlessly straightforward, surprisingly succinct, hilarious and horrifying as they are, these poems have never been as readable in English."
Norma Cole, author of Spinoza in Her Youth

Meet the Author

CHARLES BAUDELAIRE (1821-1867) wrote some of the most innovative poetry of the nineteenth century, in books including Les Fleurs du Mal and Le spleen de Paris. KEITH WALDROP is author of numerous collections of poetry and is the translator of The Selected Poems of Edmond Jabes, as well as works by Claude Royet-Journoud, Anne-Marie Albiach, and Jean Grosjean.

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The Flowers of Evil 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
"Now is the time to get absolutely drunk! On wine, on virtue, on whatever you may please." -Baudelaire. read it and believe that God has a darkside that is beautiful.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was such an excellent book it blew me away!!! The way he put his thoughts into words was incredible. A must read book. I give it 10 on 10!!!
Marcabru More than 1 year ago
Good English renderings that sing. I have an older Heritage Press collection with some of the same translations (Millay, Squire), but this collection boasts more recent poets like Fitzgerald, Kunitz, Wilbur, and Huxley. I still like the older collection: it's a little more archaic and therefore more Gothic, but these fresher translations do leap and soar and claw their ways out of the pages, too. This is the only edition I've found that includes Baudelaire's prefaces. They alone make this book a must-have. As with all ND books, this one is of archival paper, as God (or Satan Trismegistus) intended. It's too bad there are no end notes. Otherwise, this might be a perfect scholarly (and portable) edition of the Flowers.
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