Fly Away Home

( 5 )

Overview

A homeless boy who lives in an airport with his father, moving from terminal to terminal trying not to be noticed, is given hope when a trapped bird finally finds its freedom. "A first-rate picture book that deserves a place in all collections. Sure to spark discussion." -- School Library Journal, starred review

A homeless boy who lives in an airport with his father, moving from terminal to terminal and trying not to be noticed, is ...

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Overview

A homeless boy who lives in an airport with his father, moving from terminal to terminal trying not to be noticed, is given hope when a trapped bird finally finds its freedom. "A first-rate picture book that deserves a place in all collections. Sure to spark discussion." -- School Library Journal, starred review

A homeless boy who lives in an airport with his father, moving from terminal to terminal and trying not to be noticed, is given hope when he sees a trapped bird find its freedom.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this timely and touching work, Bunting and Himler present a naturalistic look at the plight of the homeless--their tale of a boy and his father living in a busy airport is all the more disturbing for its lack of a pat resolution. Ages 5-8. Mar.
Children's Literature - Jan Lieberman
The real meaning of "home" is best understood by those who have no home. Ask the boy in Eve Bunting's latest tale, he'll tell you. He and his dad don't earn enough to pay rent so they live at the airport, moving from terminal to terminal to avoid detection. The boy's loneliness, anxiety, and feeling of captivity are described vividly in text and pictures. Oh, to be free, to fly away...home. 1993 (orig.
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
There's a power in a sensitive book that features a relationship between father and child. Bunting tells the story of a homeless boy and father who live in an airport. Illustrations by Himler accent the moods of the book, the pervasive sadness and the blur of living a life that escapes anonymity only because of the bond between father and son.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-- ``My dad and I live in an airport . . . the airport is better than the streets.'' As they did in The Wall Clarion, 1990, Bunting and Himler successfully present a difficult subject in picture book format. A small child narrates the facts of his homeless existence--sleeping sitting up, washing in the restroom, and above all, avoiding being noticed. The brief text runs through all his emotions from a matter-of-fact acceptance to a fierce longing that makes him angry at those who have homes. Using subdued watercolors, Himler conveys the vast, impersonal spaces through which father and son move. He often places them at the back or edge of the pictures, underscoring their need to go unnoticed. This is a serious story but not an overpoweringly grim one. There is a reassuring togetherness between father and son and although there isn't an easy, happy ending, it does conclude on a poignant yet believable note of hope. Both illustrator and author focus on giving the child's-eye view of the problem, and their skill makes this a first-rate picture book that deserves a place in all collections. --Karen James, Louisville Free Public Library, KY
From the Publisher
"A first-rate picture book that deserves a place in all collections. Sure to spark discussion." School Library Journal, Starred
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780395664155
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 3/28/1993
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 40,269
  • Age range: 6 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: 450L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.81 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.13 (d)

Meet the Author

EVE BUNTING has written over two hundred books for children, including the Caldecott Medal-winning Smoky Night, illustrated by David Diaz. She lives in Southern California.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

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(4)

4 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2008

    I was Read this book in my childhood

    Even when it was read to me in 3rd grade, i understood clearly the point the book was trying to make:every homeless person has their story and they are everyday people like you and me.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2000

    a reviewer

    This book finds me very sad. Just yesterday we read it in school. I almost cried. It's about a mom who died and she left her son and her father. They don't have much money at all. But the airport cafferteiaia prices they can afford. Sometimes they can't even get something to drink. They have bagpacks with everything they need. They dress in blue jeens, a blue shirt and a blue jacket. One of the things in their bagpacks are a change of blue cloths. They sleep sitting up. Dad says wearing the same things is one way you can't be noticed. They sleep in different parts of the airport but they still sleep sitting up. Andrew's dad works in the office and as a school jainitor. The bus fea is about $1. Andrew even saves money in his shoe so sometime they can find a place to live. My teacher says that if they get caught the child will get put in a home and the father will be out on the streets like they both used to be.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 25, 2012

    This is a exceptional book. I recommend it to ages 10 and down.

    This is a exceptional book. I recommend it to ages 10 and down. MUST READ

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

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