Fly Away Home

Fly Away Home

4.6 5
by Eve Bunting, Ronald Himler
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

A homeless boy who lives in an airport with his father, moving from terminal to terminal trying not to be noticed, is given hope when a trapped bird finally finds its freedom. "A first-rate picture book that deserves a place in all collections. Sure to spark discussion." -- School Library Journal, starred review

Overview

A homeless boy who lives in an airport with his father, moving from terminal to terminal trying not to be noticed, is given hope when a trapped bird finally finds its freedom. "A first-rate picture book that deserves a place in all collections. Sure to spark discussion." -- School Library Journal, starred review

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this timely and touching work, Bunting and Himler present a naturalistic look at the plight of the homeless--their tale of a boy and his father living in a busy airport is all the more disturbing for its lack of a pat resolution. Ages 5-8. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Jan Lieberman
The real meaning of "home" is best understood by those who have no home. Ask the boy in Eve Bunting's latest tale, he'll tell you. He and his dad don't earn enough to pay rent so they live at the airport, moving from terminal to terminal to avoid detection. The boy's loneliness, anxiety, and feeling of captivity are described vividly in text and pictures. Oh, to be free, to fly away...home. 1993 (orig.
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
There's a power in a sensitive book that features a relationship between father and child. Bunting tells the story of a homeless boy and father who live in an airport. Illustrations by Himler accent the moods of the book, the pervasive sadness and the blur of living a life that escapes anonymity only because of the bond between father and son.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-- ``My dad and I live in an airport . . . the airport is better than the streets.'' As they did in The Wall (Clarion, 1990), Bunting and Himler successfully present a difficult subject in picture book format. A small child narrates the facts of his homeless existence--sleeping sitting up, washing in the restroom, and above all, avoiding being noticed. The brief text runs through all his emotions from a matter-of-fact acceptance to a fierce longing that makes him angry at those who have homes. Using subdued watercolors, Himler conveys the vast, impersonal spaces through which father and son move. He often places them at the back or edge of the pictures, underscoring their need to go unnoticed. This is a serious story but not an overpoweringly grim one. There is a reassuring togetherness between father and son and although there isn't an easy, happy ending, it does conclude on a poignant yet believable note of hope. Both illustrator and author focus on giving the child's-eye view of the problem, and their skill makes this a first-rate picture book that deserves a place in all collections. --Karen James, Louisville Free Public Library, KY
From the Publisher
"A first-rate picture book that deserves a place in all collections. Sure to spark discussion." School Library Journal, Starred

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395664155
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
03/28/1993
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
52,521
Product dimensions:
8.81(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.16(d)
Lexile:
450L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 - 8 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"A first-rate picture book that deserves a place in all collections. Sure to spark discussion." School Library Journal, Starred

Meet the Author

EVE BUNTING has written over two hundred books for children, including the Caldecott Medal-winning Smoky Night, illustrated by David Diaz, The Wall, Fly Away Home, and Train to Somewhere. She lives in Southern California.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Fly Away Home 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Even when it was read to me in 3rd grade, i understood clearly the point the book was trying to make:every homeless person has their story and they are everyday people like you and me.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book finds me very sad. Just yesterday we read it in school. I almost cried. It's about a mom who died and she left her son and her father. They don't have much money at all. But the airport cafferteiaia prices they can afford. Sometimes they can't even get something to drink. They have bagpacks with everything they need. They dress in blue jeens, a blue shirt and a blue jacket. One of the things in their bagpacks are a change of blue cloths. They sleep sitting up. Dad says wearing the same things is one way you can't be noticed. They sleep in different parts of the airport but they still sleep sitting up. Andrew's dad works in the office and as a school jainitor. The bus fea is about $1. Andrew even saves money in his shoe so sometime they can find a place to live. My teacher says that if they get caught the child will get put in a home and the father will be out on the streets like they both used to be.
cocoRR More than 1 year ago
This is a exceptional book. I recommend it to ages 10 and down. MUST READ
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago