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Flyboy Action Figure Comes with Gasmask
     

Flyboy Action Figure Comes with Gasmask

4.5 2
by Jim Munroe
 

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Ryan is a shy university student who can turn into a fly.

Cassandra is a waitress at a greasy spoon who can make things disappear.

In a world of political revolutionaries, indie rockers, zinesters, hardcore feminists, rave kids and slackwater poets, they are the Superheroes for Social Justice--battling cigarette barrons, redneck tabloids, the

Overview

Ryan is a shy university student who can turn into a fly.

Cassandra is a waitress at a greasy spoon who can make things disappear.

In a world of political revolutionaries, indie rockers, zinesters, hardcore feminists, rave kids and slackwater poets, they are the Superheroes for Social Justice--battling cigarette barrons, redneck tabloids, the patriarcky, and other forces of evil!

Impossible, you say?
So what?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Two 20-somethings with special powers join forces for a wave of antiestablishment activism in this big kid's parable for the electronic age, a talky, caffeine-fueled Canadian debut novel celebrating difference and peddling self-empowerment for a new generation of disaffected youth. Ryan Slint, a quirky, mildly histrionic and altogether affable University of Toronto undergraduate with a penchant for entomology falls for Cassandra, a bisexual punk rocker turned waitress who works at a diner near campus. Their increasing intimacy precipitates a string of outrageous confessions: Cass reveals that she was impregnated by an extraterrestrial and gave birth to a clairvoyant alien-human hybrid; Ryan confides he can turn into a fly at will; not to be outdone, Cass discloses that she harbors the power to make things disappear, a talent she first discovered when she was six and "disappeared" her uncle after he tried to rape her. Having come to terms with their superpowers, Ryan and Cass invent the alter egos "Flyboy" and "Ms. Place" and set out to convert their idiosyncrasies into tools for social improvement. As the Superheroes for Social Justice, they embark on a media-savvy crusade to deface cigarette billboards (Ryan's mother, a smoker, has recently been diagnosed with breast cancer), fight for the right to peacefully assemble for feminist causes and lobby for the legalization of marijuana. By the end, the Superheroes and their ragtag crew emerge from a m lange of puerile pranks, sophomoric insights and escapist stunts still young but with a good deal more direction. Munroe's exuberant, often original phrasings rescue the prose from tediously earnest heart-to-hearts and dialogue that can read like a press release. But for all their efforts, the Superheroes cannot save themselves from the excessive moralizing that makes this novel resemble a slightly less wholesome after-school special. (Nov.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780380810437
Publisher:
PerfectBound
Publication date:
11/01/1999
Series:
Quill
Pages:
260
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.65(d)

Meet the Author

Jim Munroe, 26, was a managing editor for the award-winning Adbusters magazine and has lived in South Korea and Vancouver. Currently, he lives in Toronto's Kensington Market, where he is working on a novel about a guy who goes to another planet to teach English.

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Flyboy Action Figure Comes with Gasmask 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have to say that this is one of the best books I have ever read. I laughed out loud several times at Ryan's antics. I could really identify with this character, and his problems with the opposite sex.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Unlike so many novels in the 'hip gen-x' genre, 'Flyboy' actually refrains from pretention for the most part. The summary sounds gimmicky, but don't let that fool you; Munroe never surrenders his characters to their quirks. Ryan is a sympathetic and witty protagonist, and Cassandra is an utterly interesting figure. At one point, Cass remarks that she quit the music biz because she found herself becoming a cliche. Munroe manages to stay away from the plots and dialogue that so many young authors seem to simultaneously think up. Having read some utterly horrible novels in my search for the one that captures modern young adult life, ( one novel actually contained the unforgettable line 'If I had known then what I know now, I would've taken off as quick as my rusty Chevy would've carried me.' Needless to say I threw the book across the room in frustration), 'Flyboy' is a delightful find. Munroe uses irony and cliche to playfully accent his inventive look at modern life. The reader will undoubtedly laugh out loud at his quick dialogue, which actually captures his characters, a skill which many authors lack. The novel is hilarious, without taking away from its serious moments. A perfect balance of light-heartedness and misery. Fortunately Munroe can point out the humor in life's miseries, too. 'Flyboy' is utterly twisted, which is perhaps the greatest compliment one can give to a book.