The Flying Inn (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

The Flying Inn (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

4.1 7
by G. K. Chesterton
     
 

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In a future England where a weird form of religion has resulted in a country-wide ban on drink, The Flying Inn follows the madcap adventures of a rowdy Irishman and English pub owner who, equipped with a cart of rum and a stolen tavern sign, attempt to outwit the police and undermine the new order. This hilarious send-up is perhaps even more relevant

Overview


In a future England where a weird form of religion has resulted in a country-wide ban on drink, The Flying Inn follows the madcap adventures of a rowdy Irishman and English pub owner who, equipped with a cart of rum and a stolen tavern sign, attempt to outwit the police and undermine the new order. This hilarious send-up is perhaps even more relevant nearly a century later.      

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781411444355
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
02/22/2011
Series:
Barnes & Noble Digital Library
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
322
Sales rank:
946,072
File size:
337 KB

Meet the Author

G. K. Chesterton (1874-1936) was known as the “prince of paradox,” and a prolific and influential English writer known for the wide-range of his talents, which included mysteries, fantasies, and Christian apologetics. A spirited Catholic polemicist, he was the author of the beloved Father Brown mysteries, as well as of the classic metaphysical thriller, The Man Who Was Thursday.

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The Flying Inn 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book! Chesterton has struck again!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Several OCR errors on every page, not worth trying to read in this format
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Was Chesterton anti-Semitic? That was my big question after reading this rollocking pastoral adventure. Great vocabulary, colorful characters, and Chesterton's stand-in "genius who's oppressed by all the idiots around him", his favorite recurring trope. It was a fun story, sure, but difficult to digest in the current era.
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