Flying the Dragon

( 6 )

Overview

American-born Skye is a good student and a star soccer player who never really gives any thought to the fact that her father is Japanese. Her cousin, Hiroshi, lives in Japan, and never really gives a thought to his uncle's family living in the United States. Skye and Hiroshi's lives are thrown together when Hiroshi's family, with his grandfather (who is also his best friend), suddenly moves to the U.S. Now Skye doesn't know who she is anymore: at school she's suddenly too Japanese, but at home she's not Japanese ...

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Flying the Dragon

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Overview

American-born Skye is a good student and a star soccer player who never really gives any thought to the fact that her father is Japanese. Her cousin, Hiroshi, lives in Japan, and never really gives a thought to his uncle's family living in the United States. Skye and Hiroshi's lives are thrown together when Hiroshi's family, with his grandfather (who is also his best friend), suddenly moves to the U.S. Now Skye doesn't know who she is anymore: at school she's suddenly too Japanese, but at home she's not Japanese enough. Hiroshi has a hard time adjusting to life in a new culture, and resents Skye's intrusions on his time with Grandfather. Through all of this is woven Hiroshi's expertise, and Skye's growing interest in, kite making and competitive rokkaku kite flying.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Skye’s family hasn’t spoken to her Japanese relatives for as long as she can remember, but her grandfather’s illness brings him, Skye’s cousin Hiroshi, and his parents to Virginia while Grandfather receives cancer treatments. Now, instead of joining the All-Star summer soccer team, Skye is expected to attend Saturday Japanese school and look out for Hiroshi. Hiroshi is equally resentful that he’s missing his first rokkaku kite battle in Japan, a shared activity with Grandfather, a rokkaku champion and master kite-builder. In short, third-person chapters that alternate between the two fifth-graders, debut novelist Lorenzi offers an empathetic and quietly affecting fish-out-of-water story, with both children struggling with disappointments, prejudice, language difficulties, and being caught between cultures. (Worried about spreading germs, Hiroshi wears a paper mask to school, mortifying his cousin; Skye, meanwhile, is overwhelmed by Japanese number systems: “here was another set of numbers for birds and rabbits?”) As Grandfather’s health declines, the reluctant friendship between Skye and Hiroshi develops naturally and with gentle humor, as they find commonalities and a shared love for rokkaku. Ages 9–12. Agent: Erin Murphy, Erin Murphy Literary Agency. (July)
From the Publisher
"A quiet, beautifully moving portrayal of a multicultural family." -Kirkus Reviews, starred review "[A] solid choice for middle grade audiences." - School Library Journal
• IndieBound Kids' Summer Next List 2012
• Texas Bluebonnet Award Master List 2013-2014
• NY Public Library's - 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing
• CCBC Choices 2013
• Bank Street College of Education's Best Children's Books of the Year
• IRA Children's and Young Adult Book Awards (Intermediate Fiction Honor Book)
School Library Journal
Gr 5–7—Hiroshi's grandfather is ill and needs treatment found only in the United States, and so the family is uprooted from Japan just before the big kite competition that he and his grandfather have been working toward. Hiroshi's reluctant guide to his new life in Virginia is his cousin, Skye, who would rather play soccer than get in touch with her Japanese side. Initially at odds, she and Hiroshi find common ground in coping with their grandfather's illness and come together through the traditional art of rokkaku fighting kites. The cousins' alternating chapters capture the pain of being an outsider as Skye and Hiroshi both struggle in unfamiliar situations. Hiroshi is frustrated by his limited English and embarrassed by his childish ESL reading materials while Skye feels awkward about her all-American lunches in her Saturday Japanese classes, where everyone else brings a bento. Readers will find much to relate to in this thoughtful exploration of culture shock, a family feud, and the loss of a beloved grandparent. The prose is straightforward but evocative, using imagery such as cherry blossoms to symbolize the fleeting nature of life. Readers will rejoice in the story's triumphant ending and will come away with a surprising knowledge of rokkaku kite battles, as Lorenzi integrates Japanese language and cultural elements seamlessly into the narrative. With its broad appeal for both boys and girls, this title is a solid choice for middle grade audiences.—Allison Tran, Mission Viejo Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
When her cousin unexpectedly moves from Japan to Virginia, a Japanese-American girl finds their cultural differences embarrassing until kite fighting unites them. Skye's Japanese father has not seen his family since marrying her American mother and moving to Virginia. Skye knows some Japanese, but she's an American kid, obsessed with soccer. Her Japanese cousin Hiroshi speaks some English, but he's thoroughly Japanese and loves making and flying kites with his beloved grandfather. Everything changes when Hiroshi and his family relocate near Skye's family for Grandfather's cancer treatment. Skye's parents enroll her in Japanese classes, jeopardizing her dream to play on the All-Star soccer team. Hiroshi, meanwhile, has lost his chance to compete in his town's annual rokkaku kite battle. As Skye struggles with Japanese and Hiroshi struggles with English, both feel angry and frustrated. Ashamed because Hiroshi's different, Skye fails to help him acclimate to fifth grade, where he feels like an alien. Hiroshi resents sharing Grandfather with Skye, until Grandfather's health fails, and the cousins find common ground. Skye and Hiroshi's American and Japanese perspectives emerge gradually through alternating chapters, while their grandfather functions as a pivotal character whose wisdom and legacy binds them. Details of Japanese language, culture and kite fighting enhance the diversity theme. A quiet, beautifully moving portrayal of a multicultural family. (Fiction. 9-12)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781580894340
  • Publisher: Charlesbridge
  • Publication date: 7/1/2012
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 787,912
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 610L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Natalie Dias Lorenzi is a teacher, specializing in English as a Second Language. She has taught in Japan and Italy and now teaches is a Washington, DC-area school where 85% of the students are immigrants. She also writes curriculum guides to new books for writers and publishers. FLYING THE DRAGON is her first novel.

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Read an Excerpt

Skye had known something was coming. The way her dad had been acting lately was beyond his normal weirdness. She just never guessed the something coming would be a bunch of Japanese relatives she’d never met. The first sign of trouble was when her dad switched from silverware to chopsticks. Maybe she shouldn’t have been surprised. After all, her dad was Japanese. Sort of. He’d been born and raised in Japan but hadn’t been back since he married her mom. To Skye he was pretty much American. And since Virginia is about as far away from Japan as you can get, Skye didn’t blame herself for forgetting that she was half Japanese herself.
But it wasn’t the chopsticks themselves that had started the whole thing. No, it happened when Skye had asked about them. Everything snowballed from there.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

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(6)

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2013

    Definetely worth reading!

    I love this book! It is definetely worth the money! You will not believe how good this book is! This is one of my favorite books! Please get!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2013

    Omg

    Really good book

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2013

    Read this

    I loved this book. It was very touching and nearly made me cry at the end. BTW i play animal jam plz buddy me im spottedleaf396642.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2013

    Awesome

    Cool

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    Dragonpaw

    * She scamperd down the steep slope and hurried to the rushing stream. As she hurriedly lapped up cool fresh water with her rough pink tounge she heard a crackling noise. It wasn't Honeyleaf coming to scold her because she was out late, it was prey running in the distance . Maybe she could impress master Berryclaw by catching her first prey. A wind ruffeled her soft white fur. She hurried off to find that prey.*

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2013

    Breast

    Breast

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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