Folk Medicine (North American Folklore Series)

Folk Medicine (North American Folklore Series)

by Peter Sieling
     
 
Did you ever consider taking a mixture of tar and honey to soothe a cough? Or did you know that an onion poultice is said to cure pneumonia? And how about tannic acid (found in black tea and blackberry leaves)? According to some, it's a miracle drug, good for whatever "ails you." sIn Folk Medicine you'll find more old-time remedies for a variety of ailments. You'll

Overview

Did you ever consider taking a mixture of tar and honey to soothe a cough? Or did you know that an onion poultice is said to cure pneumonia? And how about tannic acid (found in black tea and blackberry leaves)? According to some, it's a miracle drug, good for whatever "ails you." sIn Folk Medicine you'll find more old-time remedies for a variety of ailments. You'll discover the medical folklore of various groups, including: Native Americans. people from Appalachia. African Americans. Hispanic Americans. Asian Americans. sFor many people, folk practices supplement the treatments offered by modern medicine. That's why folk medicine is alive and growing today.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
The cover with Norman Rockwell's "Grandma's Remedy" sets the tone for the lovely format of this book about folk medicine. The contents include: a definition of folk medicine, ancient medicines, "science" and "folk" beliefs, Native American medicines, Appalachia folk medicines, African American folk cures, Hispanic folk healers, Asian American folk medicine, and folk medicine today. There is further breakdown of the kinds of medicine in each of these areas. There is something in this book for everyone. Each section is laid out well with photographs and nice depictions of the plant sources for many of the medicines and remedies. For many people, folk practices may supplement the treatments offered by modern medicine. The book may be used with high school students where there is an interest in such material. This "North American Folklore" series notes that Dr. Alan Jabbour, Folklorist and Former Director of the American Folklore Center, is the series consultant. 2003, Mason Crest Publishers,
— Naomi Butler
VOYA
Introducing many aspects of folklore in North America, this "North American Folklore" series helps young people "appreciate more fully the cultural fabric" they encounter, notes series editor, Dr. Alan Jabbour, a folklorist and former director of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, in his introduction to each volume. Topics as diverse as Children's Folklore, Folk Fashion, Folk Religion, and Folk Proverbs and Riddles are covered in the twenty-one volumes, each focusing on a specific subject. Of the three reviewed here, Contemporary Folklore would be of the most interest to young adults for recreational reading because it focuses mainly on urban legends. It is filled with examples of the stories passed around by friends as true accounts as it explains the history and development of urban legends. They are discussed in light of their themes, such as warnings, cyberlore, tales of travelers, or tales of humiliation. It ends with a good explanation of the purpose of legends. Folk Medicine would most likely be used by students who are doing assignments on alternative medicines or medical folklore. It gives a definition of folk medicine and offers some background on its history and development, and then each chapter discusses the folk medicine of different cultures; Native American, Appalachian, African American, Hispanic, and Asian practices are explained. Included are some recipes used in the past and a warning as to which ones should not be tried today. Firefighters' Folklore reads more like a history of fire fighting, but it has a few stories included. In light of recent emphasis on firefighters as heroes, this topic would probably interest young people. The author does agood job of detailing the development of the volunteer fire companies in America. All of the books in this series are well organized, with illustrations and sidebars of interesting facts and stories throughout. The format is attractive and the information would be easy for students to use for assignments. The glossary helps students understand the unfamiliar words that appear in boldface type in the text, although more words should have been included in the glossary. Each book lists Web sites for more information as well as print material. This series would be useful for libraries where there is an interest in folklore or classes that study it regularly. Glossary. Index. Illus. Further Reading. VOYA CODES: 4Q 1P M J (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; No YA will read unless forced to for assignments; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 2003, Mason Crest, 106p. PLB Dubois

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590843413
Publisher:
Mason Crest Publishers
Publication date:
10/28/2002
Series:
North American Folklore Series
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

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