Folk-Lore Relics Of Early Village Life

Folk-Lore Relics Of Early Village Life

by George Laurence Gomme
     
 

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Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Overview

Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781444684278
Publisher:
Read Books Design
Publication date:
12/09/2009
Pages:
258
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.58(d)

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER II. THE SETTLEMENT OF THE VILLAGE. AKING up the general pofition as fore- (hadowed in the introductory chapter, we firft deal with the village homeftead, from which iflues all the individual rights of the community, and around which is fituated all the cultivated lands and the outlying waftes of the village. The homeftead in fhort is the centre-point from which all elfe ftarts. When a primitive tribe of people, either migrating to a new land altogether, or a primitive family group breaking off from a parent ftem to make a clearing in the foreft for itfelf, fixed upon the fpot moft advantageous for fettlement, the firft thing to be done was the foundation of the homeftead. This was an important matter to the mind of primitive man, becaufe every locality was the home of and was protected by its fpecial deities. This early faith has given rife to the formulating in India of a written treatife upon the duties of builders, who muft firft afcertainby accurate meafurement the exact pofition of Vafthu-purufhathe God of the Earth.1 We have here the commencement of a large clafs of ancient faiths, namely, thofe attaching to foreft deities, hill deities, land deities, and the like. Thefe faiths are very general. They form, in fact, a section of the wide ftudy of fairy lore. Without, however, going deeply into this, I muft give one or two examples of thefe local deities in illuftration of what I mall have to fay hereafter. Everywhere the hills are the abode of fairies. Even in Polynefia we learn that wherever the Ngatoro afcended a hill, he left marks there to mow that he claimed it ; the marks he left were fairies.2 Trees alfo occupy a confpicuous place in all religiousfyftemsChinefe, Hindu, Perfian, Arabian, Babylonian, and Aflyrian. In our own land when an oak is b...

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