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Food and Drink in American History: A
     

Food and Drink in American History: A "Full Course" Encyclopedia

by Andrew F. Smith
 

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This three-volume encyclopedia on the history of American food and beverages serves as an ideal companion resource for social studies and American history courses, covering topics ranging from early American Indian foods to mandatory nutrition information at fast food restaurants.

Overview

This three-volume encyclopedia on the history of American food and beverages serves as an ideal companion resource for social studies and American history courses, covering topics ranging from early American Indian foods to mandatory nutrition information at fast food restaurants.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Teachers and libraries that support general history enthusiasts will find a lot of use for this work." - School Library Journal

"[T]he historical recipes and primary sources . . . are unique and useful for research projects. . . . Food and Drink in American History is recommended for culinary, sociology, U.S. history, and nutrition collections." - Booklist

"These articles are readable and compact yet full of information. . . . A useful set for libraries supporting those involved or interested in food studies, U.S. history, cooking, nutrition, and sociology." - Library Journal

"This is an entertaining and useful resource for school, public, and academic libraries." - ARBA

"Not only is Food and Drink in America: A Full Course Encyclopedia of interest to those studying American history and aspects of food, diet and food technology . . . it is ideal for usage in a library, particularly of a college dealing with catering, food technology or history." - Reference Reviews

Library Journal
01/01/2014
The first two volumes of Smith's (culinary history, New School Univ.; Fast Food and Junk Food: An Encyclopedia of What We Love To Eat) work contain 664 subject articles ("Appetizers," "High-Fructose Corn Syrup," "Kentucky Fried Chicken," "Cyrus Hall McCormick," and "Scandinavian American Food"), 285 of which are paired with a relevant historical recipe. While the articles focus mainly on specific foods and beverages, additional topics are explored, such as those about people, larger categories of food, food trends, and ethnic/holiday/historical cuisine. There are extensive cross-references, including references to primary sources located in the final volume—a welcome touch. A bibliography finalizes each entry. These articles are readable and compact yet full of information. The final volume contains 129 primary source documents related to food history from 1539 to 2010, a glossary, and six appendixes, the last of which lists universities with food studies programs. The volume closes with the expected bibliography and index (the same one in each volume). Smith was editor in chief of The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2004; updated in 2012). The updated Oxford offers 1,400 entries in three volumes, and those libraries owning the Oxford, particularly the 2012 update, may find it unnecessary to purchase the ABC-CLIO volume. VERDICT A useful set for libraries supporting those involved or interested in food studies, U.S. history, cooking, nutrition, and sociology. Appropriate for public and academic libraries, including high schools.—Lura Sanborn, St. Paul's Sch. Lib., Concord, NH
School Library Journal
04/01/2014
Gr 7 Up—With 664 alphabetically listed entries and 128 primary documents about people, businesses, historical periods, and food or drink items, the author's aim of providng an alternative look at American History has been met. An introductory discussion of food is subdivided by historical eras; following that is the main body of entries, which range from a third of a page to longer than six pages in length each and have black-and-white illustrations and historical recipes sprinkled throughout. Entries close with cross references and further reading lists featuring predominantly print material. Helpfully for collections supporting Common Core requirements, the last volume has primary documents that date from 1539–2012 and include letters, newspaper articles, book excerpts, and laws—even menus from the Titanic are listed. The somewhat similar Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2012) is more scholarly, but lacks recipes. Teachers and libraries that support general history enthusiasts will find a lot of use for this work.—Ann West LaPrise, Huron School District, New Boston, MI

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781610692328
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
10/31/2013
Pages:
1475
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 11.30(h) x 3.50(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Andrew F. Smith has taught the history of American food and drink at the New School University in New York, NY, for the past 18 years.

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