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Food Lover's Guide to Florence with Culinary Excursions in Tuscany
     

Food Lover's Guide to Florence with Culinary Excursions in Tuscany

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by Emily Wise Miller
 

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More than a million English-speaking visitors descend on Florence annually, but few venture beyond the usual circuit of tourist restaurants to experience authentic Tuscan cuisine. This updated guide to the best gourmet restaurants and off-the-beaten-path locales offers in-depth profiles of the spots Florentines themselves treasure. Arranged by neighborhood for easy

Overview

More than a million English-speaking visitors descend on Florence annually, but few venture beyond the usual circuit of tourist restaurants to experience authentic Tuscan cuisine. This updated guide to the best gourmet restaurants and off-the-beaten-path locales offers in-depth profiles of the spots Florentines themselves treasure. Arranged by neighborhood for easy navigation, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO FLORENCE is the single essential companion for travelers, students, and expats.

  • The only travel guide devoted solely to the food of Florence and Tuscany, including 100 restaurant reviews and tips for everything from reading the menu to wine selection.
  • Updated with the newest ristorantes, trattorias, enotecas, gelato shops, and open-air markets.
  • Florence is the second most-visited city in the world.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In her culinary guide, Miller, a freelance writer living in Florence, begins with the basics, noting the differences between a ristorante, osteria and trattoria; explaining the layout of the Italian menu ("With few variations, Florentine menus follow a standard order"); and sharing her thoughts on waiters and tipping ("Remember, no one is working toward a tip"). From there, Miller offers an introduction to Tuscan wines, and then organizes her listings in chapters such as "Restaurants and Trattorias," "International Food," and "Coffee, Pastries, and Chocolate." For such Florentine specialties as bistecca fiorentina (a T-bone steak rubbed with olive oil, salt, lemon, and rosemary and served rare) she recommends a handful of restaurants throughout the city. She also notes where vegetarians can eat well and where to find kosher restaurants. This is a smart and useful tool for foodies passing time in Tuscany. (June) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781580088251
Publisher:
Potter/TenSpeed/Harmony
Publication date:
03/26/2007
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
5.08(w) x 6.99(h) x 0.50(d)

Meet the Author

EMILY WISE MILLER is a writer and editor based in Florence, Italy. She has edited many cookbooks for Williams-Sonoma and written on food, travel, and culture for the Times of London, the San Francisco Chronicle , Salon.com, and other publications.

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Food Lover's Guide to Florence with Culinary Excursions in Tuscany 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
By Bill Marsano. Frankly I've always wondered why people go crazy about the splendid leather goods available in Florence. Yes, they're stylish, well-priced and well made--but can you eat them? To each his own, however. You want to buy shoes and handbags, or go to museums--help yourself. When I'm in Florence, I'm going to eat. The only things I buy to take away is food I want to smuggle back into the U.S. I go to Italy three to five times a year (and I'm always hungry), and Florence is one of the best cities forrestaurants, pizzerias, wine bars, specialty shops and gorgeous markets piled with fresh produce. I have lots of scribbled notes and crumpled business cards, but this book does a much better job. If I've succeeded in whetting your appetite, then grab this book before you go on your own trip. Emily Wise Miller is a good writer and an outstanding guide to the gustatory city. She hits the high spots but doesn't neglect the little-known spots that aren't smack downtown; she knows the regional specialties (the unsalted bread, the magnificent lard); she also remembers that some amongst us are vegetarians and health-food devotees. And when she's got you positively salivating, she closes her book with chapters on cooking schools and culinary tours. All you really need to do is check the photo facing the introduction. It shows a newspaper headline that freely translates as 'Delicatessen Clerk Condemned! Sold Prosciutto Different from the One the Customer Asked For!' That alone will give you an idea of how seriously Florentines take their food--and how well-tuned-in Emily Wise Miller is. (Bill Marsano is an award-winning writer on travel and wines and spirits.)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I used this book back in 2010 during my honeymoon.  It was excellent, although I'm not sure how timely the information still is.  I know that our favorite restaurant from the book is still open - Cucina Toscana Vini (also known as Osteria Vini E Cucina di Toscana).  The pizzeria that is also part of the restaurant served the best pizza we've ever had...so good that we are going to Florence for the day on an upcoming trip mainly to have it again!  The vino sfuzo section of the book actually led to one of the most memorable moments of our trip.  We located one of the shops and began speaking with the owner, who was an extremely friendly and adorable older woman.  Towards the end of our visit, we mentioned that we found her shop in the book and she had no idea she'd been featured in it!  I think the revelation made this woman's year!  I allowed her assistant to run to a local copy stand to make copies of the pages while we waited and chatted more with her.  She offered us fresh-pressed olive oil that was out of this world and we bought several small cans to take back.  We never would have found these places if it hadn't been for this book!   
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I just vacationed in Florence and found this book useless. It's heavy on the bar scene and featured places that I didn't think were particularly appealing or "local." Most of the writing sounded like self-indulgent reminiscence of the author's good times, not like a useful guide for visitors with a variety of tastes and interests. Save your money. There are many good restaurants in Florence, with standards kept high in order to garner recommendations from hotel staff and visitors' reviews. (TripAdvisor is full of reviews, and businesses proudly display their ratings.) Purchase a good guide to attractions, instead.