Food, Morals and Meaning: The Pleasure and Anxiety of Eating

Overview

Food, Morals and Meaning traces our complex relationship with food and eating and our preoccupation with diet, self-discipline and food guilt. This second edition includes an examination of how our current obsession with body size, especially fatness, drives a national and international panic about the obesity 'epidemic'. Focusing on how our food anxieties have stemmed from social, political and religious problems in Western history, Food, Morals and Meaning looks at the ancient Greeks' preoccupation with eating;...
See more details below
Hardcover (Revised)
$155.04
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$170.00 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (3) from $168.19   
  • New (1) from $168.19   
  • Used (2) from $185.25   
Food, Morals and Meaning: The Pleasure and Anxiety of Eating

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$48.95
BN.com price

Overview

Food, Morals and Meaning traces our complex relationship with food and eating and our preoccupation with diet, self-discipline and food guilt. This second edition includes an examination of how our current obsession with body size, especially fatness, drives a national and international panic about the obesity 'epidemic'. Focusing on how our food anxieties have stemmed from social, political and religious problems in Western history, Food, Morals and Meaning looks at the ancient Greeks' preoccupation with eating; early Christianity and the conflict between the pleasures of the flesh and spirituality; scientific developments in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europe and our current knowledge and social organisation of food. This original book explains how a rationalisation of food choice can be traced through a genealogy of historical social imperatives and moral panics. It is essential reading for those studying nutrition, public health, sociology of health and illness, and sociology of the body.

About the Author:
John Coveney is an Associate Professor in the Department of Public Health, Flinders University, Australia

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
'A strong contribution to the sociological understanding of food and its relation to social life has been made even stronger in this new edition. Of particular value are Coveney’s additions to his discussions of food morality in the context of Foucaultian notions of governmentality, especially in the new chapter on the governmentality of girth.'- Alex McIntosh, Professor of Sociology and Member, Faculty of Nutrition, Texas A&M University

Understanding the complex juxtapositions of the enjoyment and the pain we derive from food is the core business of John Coveney's fascinating work…This book is a 'must read' for anyone interested in the social meanings of eating. - Dr Karen Campbell, School of Exercise and Nutrition, Deakin University, Australia

In this major contribution to the food sociology literature, John Coveney insightfully applies a Foucaultian analysis to expose the multifarious ways in which the government of parental and child conduct is enacted. This book is highly relevant for those in the fields of childhood nutrition, health promotion, dietetics, and food sociology. - John Germov, The University of Newcastle Co-editor of A Sociology of Food and Nutrition: The Social Appetite (2004)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780415376204
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 7/26/2006
  • Edition description: Revised
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 208
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.56 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface to Second Edition Preface 1. Foucault, Discourse, Power and the Subject 2. Governmentality of Modern Nutrition 3. Greeks to the Christians: From Ethics to Guilt 4. Religion and Reason: The Emergence of a Discourse on Nutrition 5. Paupers, Prisoners and Moral Panics 6. The Nutritional Policing of Families 7. Nutrition Landscapes 8. Nutrition Homescapes 9. An Ethnography of Family Food: Subjects of Food Choice 10. The Governmentality of Girth 11. Conclusions Appendix References

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)