The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth

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Overview

It all began with the research of two scientists, Mr. Bensington and Professor Redwood, into the principles of growth in living matter. The fruit of their labors was a substance known as Herakleophorbia IV, but their own private term for it was "The Food of the Gods" because of its very special properties.

Their tests produced a day-old chicken as big as a buzzard. And when the substance was consumed by rats, they grew bigger than horses. Then ...

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1570020159 loose pages, some staining

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The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth

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Overview

It all began with the research of two scientists, Mr. Bensington and Professor Redwood, into the principles of growth in living matter. The fruit of their labors was a substance known as Herakleophorbia IV, but their own private term for it was "The Food of the Gods" because of its very special properties.

Their tests produced a day-old chicken as big as a buzzard. And when the substance was consumed by rats, they grew bigger than horses. Then they started feeding the "food" to human babies...

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781570020155
  • Publisher: University Publishing House, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/28/1997
  • Pages: 207
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 8.02 (h) x 0.49 (d)

Meet the Author

H. G. Wells

A pioneer of science fiction, H. G. Wells (1866-1946) wrote thrilling adventures about time travel, space exploration, alien invasion, and scientific experiments gone awry. His tales of obsession, revelation, and discovery remain compellingly readable and relevant.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Herbert George Wells (full name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      September 21, 1866
    2. Place of Birth:
      Bromley, Kent, England
    1. Date of Death:
      August 13, 1946
    2. Place of Death:
      London, England

Table of Contents

Book I--The Dawn of the Food
1. The Discovery of the Food
2. The Experimental Farm
3. The Giant Rats
4. The Giant Children
5. The Minimificence of Mr. Bensington
Book II--The Food in the Village
1. The Coming of the Food
2. The Brat Gigantic
Book III--The Harvest of the Food
1. The Altered World
2. The Giant Lovers
3. Young Caddles in London
4. Redwood's Two Days
5. The Giant Leaguer
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2013

    Test

    Test

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 12, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    The best social commentary I've ever read!

    The Food of the Gods now completes the sci-fi novels of Wells in my library. My favorite chapter of the book is Chapter III where the giant rats appear. This book isn't well known like the Time Machine or War of the Worlds yet it is very poignant because it focuses on the ethics of genetic engineering. Wells wasn't merely a writer of science fiction but a rabid social investigator. First published in 1904, the novel is very poignant because it reveals the human reaction to those who are different. Children who eat the Food of the Gods become giants and are treated as outcasts and menaces to society. The book ends with the giant's fate to be determined by a hostile world. Will they be accepted or driven to extinction like the Neandertals by modern man?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2009

    Another remarkable early SF by Wells

    This book describes the story of some growth-increasing substance, the `Food of the Gods', which after its discovery by two british gentleman-scientists spreads out, partially by insufficiently supervised experiments, and partially intentional, and generates giant plants, giant wasps, rats and other animals, and giant humans. The threat by giant animals is brought under control, but the giant humans become a political issue, a politician starts a movement that blames all difficulties on the giants, and demands that all giants be killed; the movement spreads, sweeps aside the old political structures, and takes over the country. The book ends in the night before the battle against the giants, which the giants might or survive or not, but since they spread the substance everywhere, there will be always new giants. Like other Wells classics,
    it is a strong story, which carries over weaknesses in writing and gaps in the story.

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