The Food Stylist's Handbook

The Food Stylist's Handbook

by Denise Vivaldo
     
 

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Acclaimed food stylist Denise Vivaldo shares the tips and secrets of the trade with cooks who want to become master stylists. It takes a steady hand to arrange the chocolate curls and drizzle the caramel sauce in elaborate designs on top of that sumptuous tiered cake. Whether for food blogs, television, books, magazines, movies, menus, or advertising, food stylists… See more details below

Overview

Acclaimed food stylist Denise Vivaldo shares the tips and secrets of the trade with cooks who want to become master stylists. It takes a steady hand to arrange the chocolate curls and drizzle the caramel sauce in elaborate designs on top of that sumptuous tiered cake. Whether for food blogs, television, books, magazines, movies, menus, or advertising, food stylists and photographers learn to slice, plate, tweak, and arrange so the dish becomes less a bit a food and more the work of an artisan. Learn how to create ice cream that doesn't melt under the hot camera lights, build stacks of lighter-than-air pancakes, grill a thick steak to perfection with a charcoal starter and more.

Editorial Reviews

Sacramento Book Review

In this weighty manual by Denise Vivaldo, longtime Los Angeles food stylist and food -styling business owner, aims to educate prospective food stylists about the industry. The book mostly focuses on the business aspects of the industry, such as what is expected at a styling job for a magazine image versus a television cooking show.

Vivaldo teaches readers how to write a press release, business plan, and contract of work. One hundred pages of the book do contain food-styling instructions. Bacon, for example, should be arranged across a wire rack or weaved on a wooden skewer before cooking to achieve a crispy, curled look. Salads should be arranged leaf by leaf. Make coffee appear hot by spooning detergent bubbles into the cup, and always make your own "ice cream" with a recipe of shortening, powered sugar, and corn starch. Although the styling section is interesting, the tricks used to make a food look appetizing are useless if the stylist does not know how to prepare the food item in the first place. Therefore, this book is best for a person who is already has a high competency in culinary arts.

— Megan Just

Sacramento Book Review - Megan Just

In this weighty manual by Denise Vivaldo, longtime Los Angeles food stylist and food -styling business owner, aims to educate prospective food stylists about the industry. The book mostly focuses on the business aspects of the industry, such as what is expected at a styling job for a magazine image versus a television cooking show.

Vivaldo teaches readers how to write a press release, business plan, and contract of work. One hundred pages of the book do contain food-styling instructions. Bacon, for example, should be arranged across a wire rack or weaved on a wooden skewer before cooking to achieve a crispy, curled look. Salads should be arranged leaf by leaf. Make coffee appear hot by spooning detergent bubbles into the cup, and always make your own "ice cream" with a recipe of shortening, powered sugar, and corn starch. Although the styling section is interesting, the tricks used to make a food look appetizing are useless if the stylist does not know how to prepare the food item in the first place. Therefore, this book is best for a person who is already has a high competency in culinary arts.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423614920
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
09/01/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
11 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Read an Excerpt

Building a Styling Kit: basic items that every food stylist should have

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