Fooled You!: Fakes and Hoaxes Through the Years

Fooled You!: Fakes and Hoaxes Through the Years

by Elaine Pascoe, Laurie Keller
     
 

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Hoaxes are meant to fool the world—and some people fall for them. Would you?

Crop circles. Aliens on earth. Fairies caught on film. Giant cats. What do these phenomena have in common? They are all hoaxes. Elaine Pascoe presents well-researched chapters on nearly a dozen infamous hoaxes—from the 1800s to the present—exploring the stories

Overview

Hoaxes are meant to fool the world—and some people fall for them. Would you?

Crop circles. Aliens on earth. Fairies caught on film. Giant cats. What do these phenomena have in common? They are all hoaxes. Elaine Pascoe presents well-researched chapters on nearly a dozen infamous hoaxes—from the 1800s to the present—exploring the stories behind them (how they came to be as well as who instigated them) and pondering why people were so easily fooled. These tantalizing accounts hold tremendous appeal for all ages and are as much about the craftiness of perpetrators as about the gullibility of believers. Would you have been fooled? You'll just have to read Fooled You! to find out.

With fun illustrations but Laurie Keller, author and illustrator of Arnie, the Doughnut, Fooled You!: Fakes and Hoaxes Through the Years is a fun, funny nonfiction book for the chapter book set.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Entertainment that encourages healthy skepticism makes this title a winner.” —School Library Journal

“Keller's loopy cartoons add comic inflections . . . naïve young readers will find both entertainment and food for thought here.” —Kirkus Reviews

Children's Literature
The United States Postal Service is considering charging a .50 fee for every e-mail sent over the internet. This is a well-known cyber hoax created to fool computer users. Elaine Pascoe's desire to write this book was due to the unending number of e-mail hoaxes and bogus warnings that continue to circulate. Pascoe's well-researched accounts include hoaxes from the nineteenth century through today. One chapter focuses on the hairy beast from the Northwest, Bigfoot. In 1958 a bulldozer operator found sixteen-inch footprints near his machinery. Several decades later it was revealed that the bulldozer operator's boss, Ray Wallace, planted the footprints. There are still those who believe Bigfoot exists. Pascoe warns the reader to beware of e-mail hoaxes and provides web sites that track internet hoaxes. An important lesson to learn is if something strikes you as odd or too good to be true, it probably is. The reader will want to thank Elaine Pascoe for exposing so many fakes and hoaxes. 2005, Henry Holt and Company, Ages 8 up.
—Mary Jo Edwards
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-Pascoe employs a light tone to describe 11 pranks and frauds perpetrated in the 19th and 20th centuries. Most of the stories will be familiar to fans of historical oddities. The Fejee Mermaid, the Cardiff Giant, the Piltdown Man, fairy photographs, Bigfoot, and crop circles have been the subjects of similar works, such as Alex Boese's The Museum of Hoaxes (Penguin, 2003) and Judith Herbst's Hoaxes (Lerner, 2004). Like other volumes on this subject, this one includes a few lesser-known items including the New York Sun's report of the first East to West Atlantic balloon crossing in 1844, a report submitted by a struggling journalist named Edgar Allan Poe. What is not as common in other works on the topic are the clear explanations of who thought of the hoaxes and how and why they developed them. A list of six similar titles from the 1990s and another of nine Web sites that track current hoaxes or describe historical ones are appended. Keller's silly cartoon illustrations help maintain a light tone. Entertainment that encourages healthy skepticism makes this title a winner.-Ann G. Brouse, Steele Memorial Library, Elmira, NY Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
From Edgar Allan Poe's bogus newspaper report of a balloon flight across the Atlantic to the heartrending blog of a fictional dying teen, "Kaycee Nicole Swenson," Pascoe reports on over a dozen sensation-creating hoaxes perpetrated over the past two centuries. Writing in a "can you believe this?" tone of the Cardiff Giant and Piltdown Man, of Bigfoot and crop circles, of John Worrell Keely's "ether" driven motor and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's fairies, she concludes that people will continue to believe, even after the hoax is exposed, if the story is good enough. Keller's loopy cartoons add comic inflections, but photographic illustrations would have underscored the reality of these historical episodes. Still, naive young readers will find both entertainment and food for thought here. (generous, partly annotated, resource list) (Nonfiction. 9-11)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781250079909
Publisher:
Square Fish
Publication date:
03/15/2016
Pages:
96
Sales rank:
475,816
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
8 - 11 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Elaine Pascoe has written many nonfiction books for young readers and has worked as a newspaper reporter, magazine writer, and editor. She lives in Connecticut.

Laurie Keller is the acclaimed author-illustrator of Do Unto Otters, Arnie, the Doughnut, The Scrambled States of America, and Open Wide: Tooth School Inside, among numerous other books for children. She earned a B.F.A. at Kendall College of Art and Design. She lives in Michigan, in a little cottage in the woods on the shore of Lake Michigan.

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