For All the Tea in China: How England Stole the World's Favorite Drink and Changed History [NOOK Book]

Overview

"If ever there was a book to read in the company of a nice cuppa, this is it." -The Washington Post

In the dramatic story of one of the greatest acts of corporate espionage ever committed, Sarah Rose recounts the fascinating, unlikely circumstances surrounding a turning point in economic history. By the middle of the nineteenth century, the British East India Company faced the loss of its monopoly on the fantastically lucrative tea trade with...
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For All the Tea in China: How England Stole the World's Favorite Drink and Changed History

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Overview

"If ever there was a book to read in the company of a nice cuppa, this is it." -The Washington Post

In the dramatic story of one of the greatest acts of corporate espionage ever committed, Sarah Rose recounts the fascinating, unlikely circumstances surrounding a turning point in economic history. By the middle of the nineteenth century, the British East India Company faced the loss of its monopoly on the fantastically lucrative tea trade with China, forcing it to make the drastic decision of sending Scottish botanist Robert Fortune to steal the crop from deep within China and bring it back to British plantations in India. Fortune's danger-filled odyssey, magnificently recounted here, reads like adventure fiction, revealing a long-forgotten chapter of the past and the wondrous origins of a seemingly ordinary beverage.


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Editorial Reviews

Adrian Higgins
With her probing inquiry and engaging prose, Sarah Rose paints a fresh and vivid account of life in rural 19th-century China and Fortune's fateful journey into it…if ever there was a book to read in the company of a nice cuppa, this is it.
—The Washington Post
From the Publisher
"With her probing inquiry and engaging prose, Sarah Rose paints a fresh and vivid account of life in rural 19th-century China and Fortune's fateful journey into it." —-The Washington Post
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101190012
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 3/18/2010
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 221,210
  • File size: 327 KB

Meet the Author


Sarah Rose has worked as a journalist in Hong Kong, Miami, and New York, and now covers food and travel for such magazines as Men's Journal, Bon Appetit, and Brides.

Sarah Rose has worked as a journalist in Hong Kong, Miami, and New York, and now covers food and travel for such magazines as Men's Journal, Bon Appetit, and Brides.

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Table of Contents

Prologue 1

1 Min River, China, 1845 6

2 East India House, City of London, January 12, 1848 22

3 Chelsea Physic Garden, May 7, 1848 35

4 Shanghai to Hangzhou, September 1848 54

5 Zhejiang Province near Hangzhou, October 1848 67

6 A Green Tea Factory, Yangtze River, October 1848 83

7 House of Wang, Anhui Province, November 1848 93

8 Shanghai at the Lunar New Year, January 1849 107

9 Calcutta Botanic Garden, March 1849 115

10 Saharanpur, North-West Provinces, June 1849 125

11 Ningbo to Bohea, the Great Tea Road, May and June 1849 136

12 Bohea, July 1849 152

13 Pucheng, September 1849 171

14 Shanghai, Autumn 1849 182

15 Shanghai, February 1851 190

16 Himalayan Mountains, May 1851 206

17 Royal Small Arms Factory, Enfield Lock, 1852 217

18 Tea for the Victorians 227

19 Fortune's Story 238

Acknowledgments 246

Notes 249

Index 253

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 25 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 25 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 9, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Espionage is fun!

    As a self-proclaimed theic (one who is addicted to tea), I am thrilled someone, in modern times, has tackled this vast, interwoven tale of a name that changed so much but it little remembered. Tea is like wine. Growing seasons, climates, picking times, drying, storing and shipping all affect the taste. And there are plenty who prefer a potent earl grey to a warm green tea. And it was plant-hunter and spy Robert Fortune who discovered (for the Western world) that these two very different teas grew from the same plant. Author Sarah Rose delves into the seductive past and retrieves the best, most aromatic leaves for our enjoyment.

    The fortuitously-named Robert Fortune took on a great adventure in the name of tea and Queen. The East India Company was losing money, so they decided to steal the secrets of Chinese tea and transplant them to India, where they still had power. They tapped Fortune to be their spy. This debut book by Sarah Rose, follows Fortune on his journey. With stories gleaned from Fortune's meticulous diaries and journals, Rose maintains an even keel between historical background and plant-hunting espionage. Her descriptions of inland China, with terraced hillsides, fresh peaches, and blooming forsythia are intoxicating. Wandering along the river, filling glass Wardian cases with exotic plants sounds divine. This idyllic setting is counterbalanced by the danger of impersonating a Mandarin Chinese and avoiding suspicion.

    Indeed, there are many intricate details of Chinese society that this tale of tea serves to enlighten. While Fortune was a hero to the West, he was clearly an enemy to China and the East. Through Rose's telling of Fortune's exploits, we see the emotional complications of respect for and exploitation of another culture. It is clear that not only Fortune himself benefiting from his travels, but the economy of the strongest Empire in the world.

    I spent a summer as a gardener at the Canterbury Shaker Village and one of my jobs was to harvest and dry the mint for their four mint tea. It was a quiet, peaceful job, if not an easy one, but it is still the best job I've ever had. Particularly in an age when we are once again learning to respect the value of a growing our own gardens, in some small way, I'd like to think I was following in Robert Fortune's steps. The gardening part; not the traveling and spying part.

    http://cineastesbookshelf.blogspot.com

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2011

    A Must-Have for Tea Lovers and Historians Alike!

    The author delivers a frank visit to England, China, and India in the 19th century that enables the reader to vividly learn about tea and its cultural impact.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 2, 2011

    A pleasant surprise

    This topic is the kind of thing you usually find in the remainders pile. Not this book. It is a page turner. Well researched and well written. A good read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 8, 2013

    Sarah Rose¿s book is truly adventurous and interesting to me bec

    Sarah Rose’s book is truly adventurous and interesting to me because it made me realize that some things that seem so simple to handle,


    can be so difficult. Readers that like somewhat crucial and yet real, well, I am assuming that most of the book is what really happened in the eighteen hundreds. I liked the book; because it was informative and I learned more about tea thyan I thought I would have to. I liked the part when Robert Fortune was offering the Wang family if he could basically help them fix up their home while he was staying there. I think that the reading level would be at a high school and possibly college ages. But arguing with a website that I found, I read that they put minimum and maximum ages to read the book was seventeen to eighteen years of age. And the grade levels being in junior year to college freshmen. I am only a high school freshmen, I guess I can say that this book was one I liked even though some places were harder for me to understand.
    And the book came alive in my mind, and I could feel like I was traveling to amazing places that someday I would love to go visit today. Sarah Rose made this only a few years ago in 2010 in the United States, and a year earlier in England, and she was born in 1977, so she was thirty three years of age, and just a bit out of college maybe. So that can prove that her book was sort of meant for older people, but I think I challenged myself learning about China and England. The things that stood out from this was how much detail she put into writing her book, and the creativity of what those regions would have been like in the cultures, and including the important people that took part in the storyline.
    I would surely recommend this book to fellow readers that may have a caffeine and tea addiction, or college kids that love history. For example I might recommend this book to my sister-in-law and one of my dear friends, they both like reading almost anything in their spare time, and possibly to read drink some tea and biscuits. That last part was just a little British like humor! I highly think that this is a really good book for another high schooler that is seeking for a book to read for another report or just for fun. Here is a piece of advice for people of my age that absolutely hate reading, do not judge a book by its cover and take in a few words into your head and then immediately stop reading any book. In the long run, you can end up not knowing how the rest of the story is like, and what you will do with the book in the future. And also that even I get a quick look at a book someone recommends to me, and I begin to hate it. But actually I do love reading, so I would not be so hard on reading “For All the Tea in China”.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 21, 2013

    A wonderful history of tea and how it is now grown in other par

    A wonderful history of tea and how it is now grown in other parts of the world is interesting enough but the the history of the journey outside the original soil in which it was grown and how this was accomplished is written in such a fascinating way as to keep the pages turning. The descriptions of Robert Fortune on these adventures and the process of how they invented ways to transport the tea and other plants is extremely interesting..

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2012

    Sometimes the most unbelievable stories are real

    Youll never look at tea the same way again!

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  • Posted June 25, 2012

    never knew so much about the history of one large commodity... T

    never knew so much about the history of one large commodity... Tea

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted May 17, 2010

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