For Argument's Sake: A Guide to Writing Effective Arguments / Edition 3 by Katherine J. Mayberry, Robert E. Golden | | 9780321014672 | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
For Argument's Sake: A Guide to Writing Effective Arguments / Edition 3

For Argument's Sake: A Guide to Writing Effective Arguments / Edition 3

by Katherine J. Mayberry, Robert E. Golden
     
 

ISBN-10: 0321014677

ISBN-13: 9780321014672

Pub. Date: 08/11/1998

Publisher: Addison-Wesley

This concise, reader-friendly rhetoric provides clear, highly practical advice for writing arguments, including the four most common types: factual, causal, evaluation, and recommendation. KEYTOPICS: Structured around the three main phases of writing - focusing, supporting, and reviewing, For Argument's Sake helps readers find

Overview

This concise, reader-friendly rhetoric provides clear, highly practical advice for writing arguments, including the four most common types: factual, causal, evaluation, and recommendation. KEYTOPICS: Structured around the three main phases of writing - focusing, supporting, and reviewing, For Argument's Sake helps readers find and focus a claim, identify an audience, work through the support process, and then refine and polish their argument. Numerous sample arguments illustrate the principles and strategies. This edition features new coverage of conducting and evaluating electronic research and additional writing samples. For those interested in improving their critical thinking, reading and writing skills.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780321014672
Publisher:
Addison-Wesley
Publication date:
08/11/1998
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
208
Product dimensions:
6.36(w) x 9.19(h) x 0.52(d)

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
An Introduction to Argument
1(8)
An Extended Definition
1(2)
The Classes of Argument
3(1)
Argument Through Image
4(1)
The Argument Process
4(3)
Forming the Argument
5(1)
Supporting the Claim
6(1)
Reviewing the Argument
6(1)
Conclusion
7(2)
Summary: An Introduction to Argument
7(1)
Suggestions for Writing (1.1)
8(1)
Where Writing Begins: Motives and Audience
9(9)
Motives For Writing
9(3)
The Value of Dissonance
10(1)
Writing Arguments That Are Meaningful to You
11(1)
Activities (2.1)
12(1)
The Importance of Audience
12(6)
Who Is the Audience?
12(2)
Activities (2.2)
14(1)
Why Will the Audience Read the Argument?
15(1)
Activities (2.3)
15(1)
What Should the Audience Be Able to Do After Reading the Argument?
16(1)
Activities (2.4)
16(1)
Summary: Where Writing Begins
17(1)
Suggestions for Writing (2.5)
17(1)
The Claim
18(18)
How Claims Work
18(5)
Finding a Claim
19(2)
Keeping Your Working Claim Flexible
21(1)
Activities (3.1)
22(1)
Positioning the Claim
23(2)
Claim Stated Up Front
23(1)
Claim Stated at the End of the Argument
24(1)
Unstated Claim in an Argument
24(1)
Activities (3.2)
24(1)
Classifying Your Claim
25(11)
Factual Claims
25(2)
Activities (3.3)
27(1)
Causal Claims
27(1)
Activities (3.4)
28(1)
Evaluations
29(1)
Activities (3.5)
30(1)
Recommendations
31(1)
Activities (3.6)
32(1)
Combination Claims
33(1)
Activities (3.7)
34(1)
Summary: The Claim
35(1)
Suggestions for Writing (3.8)
35(1)
An Argument's Support
36(14)
Some Varieties of Support
37(4)
Secondary Claims
37(1)
Activities (4.1)
38(1)
Comparisons
38(1)
Appeals to Authority
38(1)
Appeals to Audience Needs and Values
38(1)
Activities (4.2)
39(1)
Addressing the Counterargument
39(2)
Arranging Your Argument's Support
41(2)
Activities (4.3)
42(1)
Definitions
43(7)
When to Define
44(1)
Types of Definitions
45(3)
Activities (4.4)
48(1)
Summary: An Argument's Support
48(1)
Suggestions for Writing (4.5)
49(1)
Making Reasonable Arguments: Formal and Informal Logic
50(15)
Formal Logic
50(7)
Induction
51(1)
Deduction
52(4)
Activities (5.1)
56(1)
The Toulmin Model: A Modern Variant of Formal Logic
57(2)
Activities (5.2)
59(1)
Informal Fallacies
59(6)
Ad Hominem Argument
60(1)
Ad Populum Argument
60(1)
Circular Argument
60(1)
Distraction
60(1)
Either-or Argument
60(1)
Emotive Language
61(1)
False Analogy
61(1)
Hasty Generalization
61(1)
Non Sequitur
61(1)
Post Hoc, Ergo Propter Hoc
62(1)
Slippery Slope
62(1)
Strawperson Argument
62(1)
Activities (5.3)
63(1)
Summary: Making Reasonable Arguments: Formal and Informal Logic
63(1)
Suggestions for Writing (5.4)
64(1)
Arguing Facts
65(25)
What is a Fact?
65(2)
Supporting Facts Reported by Primary and Secondary Sources
67(3)
Evaluating Print Sources
67(1)
Evaluating Electronic Sources
68(1)
Citing the Source in Your Text
69(1)
Activities (6.1)
69(1)
Supporting Personally Experienced Facts
70(2)
Describing the Experience
70(1)
Establishing Your Own Credibility
71(1)
Supporting Factual Generalizations
72(3)
Applying the Principles of Induction
72(3)
Activities (6.2)
75(1)
Statistics
75(4)
Activities (6.3)
78(1)
Summary: Arguing Facts
78(1)
Three Sample Factual Arguments
79(11)
Suggestions for Writing (6.4)
88(2)
Arguing Cause
90(23)
Determining Cause
90(5)
Brainstorming for Possible Causes
91(1)
Activities (7.1)
92(1)
Necessary and Sufficient Causes
92(1)
Identifying Sufficient Causes
93(1)
Applying the Toulmin Model
94(1)
Activities (7.2)
94(1)
Distinguishing Among Sufficient Causes
95(2)
Method of Agreement
96(1)
Method of Difference
96(1)
Method of Proportional Correlation
96(1)
Activities (7.3)
97(1)
Causal Chains
97(1)
Contributing Factors
98(1)
Activities (7.4)
98(1)
Summary: Determining Cause
99(1)
Supporting Causal Claims
99(4)
Establishing Factuality
100(1)
Identifying an Acceptable Motivation
100(1)
Describing the Process of Validation
100(2)
Qualifying Your Argument
102(1)
Activities (7.5)
103(1)
Summary: Supporting Causal Claims
103(1)
Arguing Effects
103(4)
Determining and Supporting a Probable Effect
104(2)
Activities (7.6)
106(1)
Summary: Determining and Arguing a Probable Effect
107(1)
Two Sample Causal Arguments
107(6)
Suggestions for Writing (7.7)
112(1)
Arguing Evaluations
113(26)
Evaluative Subjects and Terms
113(1)
Activities (8.1)
114(1)
Establishing The Definition of the Evaluative Term
114(4)
Presenting the Definition
115(1)
Activities (8.2)
116(1)
Arguing the Definition
116(1)
Ranking the Qualities in Your Definition
117(1)
Activities (8.3)
118(1)
Arguing the Evaluation
118(2)
Testing Your Evaluation Through the Syllogism
119(1)
Activities (8.4)
120(1)
Further Methods Of Supporting Evaluations
120(1)
Identification of Effect
120(1)
Appeal to Authority
120(1)
Comparison
121(1)
Activities (8.5)
121(1)
The Varieties Of Evaluations
121(10)
Ethical Evaluations
121(2)
Activities (8.6)
123(1)
Aesthetic Evaluations
123(2)
Activities (8.7)
125(1)
Functional Evaluations
125(1)
Activities (8.8)
126(1)
Interpretations
126(4)
Activities (8.9)
130(1)
Summary: Arguing Evaluations
130(1)
Sample Ethical Evaluation
131(3)
Sample Interpretation
134(5)
Suggestions for Writing (8.10)
138(1)
Arguing Recommendations
139(21)
Audience Needs and Values
140(3)
When Your Values Differ from Assumed Reader Values
140(2)
Activities (9.1)
142(1)
Recommendations Emphasizing the Present
143(2)
Establishing the Current Situation
143(1)
Evaluating the Current Situation
143(1)
Applying the Toulmin Model
144(1)
Activities (9.2)
144(1)
Recommendations Emphasizing the Future
145(7)
Presenting the Recommendation
145(2)
Activities (9.3)
147(1)
Arguing the Effects of Your Recommendation
148(1)
Activities (9.4)
148(1)
Judging Effects in Terms of Assumed Needs and Values
149(1)
Applying the Toulmin Model
150(1)
Activities (9.5)
151(1)
Recommendations that Consider Present and Future
152(1)
Summary: Arguing Recommendations
152(1)
Two Sample Recommendations
153(7)
Suggestions for Writing (9.6)
159(1)
Writing and Image
160(11)
The Role of Voice
160(3)
The Importance of Ethos
161(1)
Activities (10.1)
162(1)
The Virtues and Limitations of Plain Writing
163(1)
Figures Of Speech
164(2)
Some Cautions About Figures of Speech
165(1)
Activities (10.2)
166(1)
Connotative Language and Slanting
166(2)
Activities (10.3)
167(1)
The Music of Language
168(3)
Activities (10.4)
169(1)
Summary: Writing and Image
170(1)
Suggestions for Writing (10.5)
170(1)
Introductions and Conclusions
171(12)
Introductions
171(4)
Strategies for General Introductions
172(1)
Introductions in Professional Writing
173(1)
General Suggestions About Introductions
174(1)
Activities (11.1)
175(1)
Conclusions
175(3)
Types of Conclusions
176(2)
Summaries
178(5)
Activities (11.2)
180(1)
Summary: Introductions and Conclusions
181(1)
Suggestions for Writing (11.3)
181(2)
Revising
183(14)
Writing a First Draft, Revising, and Editing
183(1)
Some Suggestions for Successful Revising
184(4)
Suggestion 1: Give Yourself Some Breathing Space
184(1)
Suggestion 2: Avoid the Red Pen
185(1)
Suggestion 3: Review Your Original Purpose and Audience
185(1)
Suggestion 4: Review Your Organization
185(1)
Suggestion 5: Review Your Argument's Coherence
186(1)
Suggestion 6: Review Your Style
186(1)
Suggestion 7: Review Your Argument for Faulty Reasoning
187(1)
Suggestion 8: Use a Word Processor
187(1)
Activities (12.1)
187(1)
Summary: Revising
188(1)
An Example of Revision
188(9)
Activities (12.2)
194(1)
Suggestions for Writing (12.3)
195(2)
Credits 197(2)
Index 199

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