For Better, for Worse: A Guide to Surviving Divorce for Preteens and Their Families

For Better, for Worse: A Guide to Surviving Divorce for Preteens and Their Families

by Janet Bode, Stan Mack, Ronnie Kaufman
     
 

PETER, AGE ELEVEN:

My parents are talking divorce and I'm thinking, "Is it something I did? What happens now? Who do I live with? Will we still live together or will we separate?"

So many questions with no answers.

Divorce affects half of the nation's children. As parents divorce and remarry, kids can feel squeezed

Overview

PETER, AGE ELEVEN:

My parents are talking divorce and I'm thinking, "Is it something I did? What happens now? Who do I live with? Will we still live together or will we separate?"

So many questions with no answers.

Divorce affects half of the nation's children. As parents divorce and remarry, kids can feel squeezed and battered emotionally. Often they wonder if what they are experiencing is normal. Often they feel confused. Often they feel alone.

Janet Bode explored these feelings in interviews with more than a thousand students, as well as parents, therapists, religious leaders, teachers, and others. From these interviews she presents first-person accounts that detail the effects of divorce and offers solutions that have worked. A separate section geared to adult readers aims to help them minimize both the short-term and long-range impact of divorce on their children. And a final section suggests print and on-line resources for kids and their parents.

This is a needed, compelling, and inspiring guide for what can be a difficult time in anyone's life. For Peter, and anyone else with "so many questions," For Better, For Worse is a book of answers.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Divided into two parts, the first "For girls and boys," the second for parents, For Better, For Worse: A Guide to Surviving Divorce for Preteens and Their Families by Janet Bode and Stan Mack offers quotes from children who have lived through their parents' divorce and encourages parents to talk with their children with practical tips. Some children give anecdotes in the form of cartoons, some through poetry, and there is a recurring "Kid problem, Kid solutions" section. By keeping the focus on children, often in their own words, the authors present a variety of situations and experiences to validate the reader's own predicament. (Feb.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
This is a book of questions and answers for preteens who are affected by divorce. The author interviewed more than a thousand students plus a large number of parents, therapists, religious leaders and teachers. She used these interviews to present first-person accounts of feelings and questions, and she offers solutions that have worked for others. There is a section for kids and another for adults. This guide includes an extensive section of print and online resources. Scattered throughout the book are cartoons, poems by kids, and surveys. This is a very thorough book that considers the issues that are important to preteens. The format is "friendly," so reluctant readers won't be put off. Parents and teachers can also use the information in the book to form "Banana Splits" groups. 2001, Simon & Schuster, $16.00. Ages 10 to 12. Reviewer: S. Latson SOURCE: Parent Council, September 2001 (Vol. 9, No. 1)
School Library Journal
Gr 4-8-In this refreshingly honest book, seven preteens discuss their experiences with divorce-stepparents, custody arrangements, remarriage, money woes, and more. One uses a comic-strip format; many others comment briefly or share their advice, poetry, and art. Their stories reflect agony, confusion, and the occasional flash of humor. Even the brief comments prove heartrending: "We moved from a house to an apartment," says 12-year-old Alice. "Through the walls I can hear my mom and her latest boyfriend having sex. I hate it." Others seem more accepting of the changes in their lives. Therapists chime in at the end of each narrative to offer insight and remind kids that they aren't to blame. But the best statements, offered bluntly and without sugarcoating, come from the contributors themselves. Their remarks are revealing-for example, 12-year-old Brandon says the best thing about divorce is that "You can get out of trouble because you have a good excuse, the divorce." Others offer strategies for manipulating feuding parents. Readers will recognize and appreciate the honesty here, and the fact that no one offers easy answers. The second part of the book is aimed at divorcing parents, which does seem slightly out of place in what is primarily a forum for young voices. Still, For Better, for Worse is a useful resource for preteens who need to know they are not alone.-Miranda Doyle, San Francisco Public Library Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689819452
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
Publication date:
02/01/1901
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
5.62(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.69(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >