For Labor, Race, and Liberty: George Edwin Taylor, His Historic Run for the White House, and the Making of Independent Black Politics

For Labor, Race, and Liberty: George Edwin Taylor, His Historic Run for the White House, and the Making of Independent Black Politics

by Bruce L. Mouser
     
 

More than one hundred years before Barack Obama, George Edwin Taylor made presidential history. Born in the antebellum South to a slave and a freed woman, Taylor became the first African American ticketed as a political party’s nominee for president of the United States, running against Theodore Roosevelt in 1904.
    Orphaned as a child at

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Overview

More than one hundred years before Barack Obama, George Edwin Taylor made presidential history. Born in the antebellum South to a slave and a freed woman, Taylor became the first African American ticketed as a political party’s nominee for president of the United States, running against Theodore Roosevelt in 1904.
    Orphaned as a child at the peak of the Civil War, Taylor spent several years homeless before boarding a Mississippi riverboat that dropped him in La Crosse, Wisconsin. Taken in by an African American farm family, Taylor attended a private school and eventually rose to prominence as the owner/editor of a labor newspaper and as a vocal leader in Wisconsin’s People’s Party. At a time when many African Americans felt allegiance to the Republican Party for its support of abolition, Taylor’s sympathy with the labor cause drew him first to the national Democratic Party and then to an African American party, the newly formed National Liberty Party, which in 1904 named him its presidential candidate. Bruce L. Mouser follows Taylor’s life and career in Arkansas, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Florida, giving life to a figure representing a generation of African American idealists whose initial post-slavery belief in political and social equality in America gave way to the despair of the Jim Crow decades that followed.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780299249144
Publisher:
University of Wisconsin Press
Publication date:
01/21/2011
Edition description:
1
Pages:
278
Sales rank:
927,678
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.80(d)

Table of Contents

Charts & Maps, Pictures, Acronysm

Acknowledgements

Preface

Chapter 1: Prologue

Chapter 2: From Orphaned Black to Printer's Devil: Taylor's Early Years in God's Country

Chapter 3: Labor Agitator, Newspaper Editor, and Political Novice: Schools of Hard Knocks

Chapter 4: Emergence of a Black Activist: Joining the African-American World and Succeeding

Chapter 5: Taylor: The National Democrat

Chapter 6: " A Duty to His Race": Taylor and His Campaign to Become President

Chapter 7: Escape to a Warm Place

Chapter 8: Conclusion

Chapter 9: Author's Reflections

Appendices:

A. Taylor interview with The Sun after the 1904 election

B. "Speech of Mr. W. L. Smith before the Convention of the Liberty Party at Douglass Hall"

C. "President Mitchell Blackmailed"

D. Letter from James Ross to George Taylor, 9 August 1904

E. "National Appeal to the American Negro—Why we should favor the Chicago Platform:

F. "Woman's Work." Address and communications for this department by Cora E. Taylor, Editor, Solicitor Office, Oskaloosa, Iowa

G. "Letter of acceptance made public today by Hon. George E. Taylor"

H. Election data for 1904 presidental election

I. Chart of George Edwin Taylor's life course

Bibliography

Endnotes

Index

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