Forced Ranking: Making Performance Management Work

Overview

Forced ranking assesses employee performance relative to peers rather than against predetermined goals. Grote, a performance management consultant, argues that forced ranking can be the antidote to the common problems of inflated ratings and flawed appraisal processes that many organizations encounter. He dispels common misperceptions about the process and explains how to create a forced-ranking system that is fair and effective. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR ...
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Overview

Forced ranking assesses employee performance relative to peers rather than against predetermined goals. Grote, a performance management consultant, argues that forced ranking can be the antidote to the common problems of inflated ratings and flawed appraisal processes that many organizations encounter. He dispels common misperceptions about the process and explains how to create a forced-ranking system that is fair and effective. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781591397489
  • Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press
  • Publication date: 11/14/2005
  • Pages: 260
  • Sales rank: 711,762
  • Product dimensions: 6.44 (w) x 9.60 (h) x 1.04 (d)

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2008

    The word 'Forced' ought to be a big warning sign

    In his previous book, Discipline Without Punishment, the author¿s main premise was that employee punishment should be avoided at all cost as it ¿produces side effects and long-term consequences ¿ anger, apathy, resentment, frustration ¿ that end up being far more costly than whatever the original misbehavior might have been¿. However, in this book, the author unconvincingly turns right around and tells the reader that a Forced Ranking System is really not a form of the same type of employee punishment and does not elicit the same long-term consequences. This is illogical and many facts work to contradict the author¿s main message. Wherever a Forced Ranking system has been put in place, people come to resent it. Good employees resent being forced into the bottom 10% category which yields them no pay raise and puts them on an embarrassing probationary period even when they have been meeting the company¿s performance standards and good managers resent being forced to ¿reward¿ good employees this way. Turnover of good employees costs companies millions of dollars every year as well. The cost of hiring new employees is a minimum of 2x the salary of the position, good employees that are let go merely go work for the competition and high turnover never allows the company to establish an experienced world class workforce which generally takes about 15 years to develop. From every angle this is a bad system to indoctrinate into any organization but then again any merit system that begins with the word ¿Forced¿ ought to be a big warning sign.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2006

    Be Good, or Be Gone

    Forced ranking is a loaded topic. Any system that suggests that a company should fire the bottom 10% of its workforce will raise eyebrows. But author Dick Grote, a performance management expert, makes a thorough case for the harsh rigors of forced ranking. By tapping his personal experiences and utilizing input from industry leaders, Grote assembles a thoughtful and convincing presentation. At the same time, he addresses problems and obstacles inherent in forced ranking. We recommend this book as must reading for the leaders of any company that is considering a forced ranking system. It will also prove valuable to human resource professionals and those who just want to know what all the hubbub is about. Indeed, you might say this book scores in the top 10%, so the author can breathe a sigh of relief - for now.

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