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Forces for Good: The Six Practices of High-Impact Nonprofits
     

Forces for Good: The Six Practices of High-Impact Nonprofits

3.0 7
by Leslie R. Crutchfield, Heather McLeod Grant, Steve Case
 

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Praise for Forces for Good

"Crutchfield and McLeod Grant have made a significant contribution with a Very Big Idea— the shift in focus from building an organization to building a movement. Inspired and inspiring, this book can change the way the world works by changing how leaders think."
—Jim Collins, author, Good to Great, and coauthor

Overview

Praise for Forces for Good

"Crutchfield and McLeod Grant have made a significant contribution with a Very Big Idea— the shift in focus from building an organization to building a movement. Inspired and inspiring, this book can change the way the world works by changing how leaders think."
—Jim Collins, author, Good to Great, and coauthor, Built to Last

"The [nonprofits] having the greatest impact these days are those that have moved beyond old traditions. They are entrepreneurial, adaptive, externally-oriented, and sometimes a little messy. Working together, they are not only trying to fix problems, but also reform whole systems. For people who want to change the world—and who doesn't?—this book provides an invaluable road map. Bravo!"
—David Gergen, professor of public service and director, Center for Public Leadership, Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government

"Global problems like abject poverty and climate change require innovative, scaleable solutions. We have so much to learn from these six practices because they're what lead to wide-scale social change."
—Larry Brilliant, executive director, Google.org, and Sheryl Sandberg, board member, Google.org, and vice president, Google.com

"If you're a funder, you have to read this book. It will frame how you think about lasting impact and greatly enhance your due diligence. The six practices should be your six principles of grantmaking."
—Edward Skloot, president, The Surdna Foundation

"[This book] frees entrepreneurs from the distraction of conventional management measurements. Instead, its findings say, 'Go ahead and change the world!' Indeed! This is the only true bottom line."
—Bill Drayton, chair and CEO, Ashoka: Innovators for the Public, and chair, Youth Venture

"Anyone who wants to affect systemic change and make a lasting difference in the world should read this important book and take its lessons to heart."
—J. Gregory Dees, professor, Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship, Duke University's Fuqua School of Business

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470893944
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
05/28/2010
Series:
J-B US non-Franchise Leadership , #36
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
336
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Leslie R. Crutchfield is a managing director of Ashoka: Innovators of the Public, a philanthropic adviser, and a research grantee of The Aspen Institute's Nonprofit Sector and Philanthropy Program. She serves on the board of the SEED Foundation and resides in the Washington, D.C., area.

Heather McLeod Grant is an adviser to the Center for Social Innovation at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business and to leading nonprofits. She is a former McKinsey & Company consultant, serves on the Advisory Board of Stanford Social Innovation Review, and resides in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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Forces for Good: The Six Practices of High-Impact Nonprofits 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The method used to select charities to study both made the results too narrow for general use and also assumed a definition of 'effectiveness' that had more to do with changing government policies than with impacting people's lives: no non-American charities, no charities founded before 1964 or after 1994, no church-related charities, only charities with national impact, and then the 'best' were chosen not by an objective criteria but by popularity among charity leaders. Rather than finding and analyzing the most effective charities at helping people, the book analyzes those who've gained the most noteriety for affecting policies. Within that scope, the book's conclusions seem solid, but that scope does not apply to the majority of charitable work. And the assumption that the greatest 'results' come from policy changes runs counter to much more thorough and objective research from people like William Easterly, a long-time World Bank economist who demonstrated in 'The White Man's Burden' that top-down change through governments is most often counter productive. The charities that change lives most effectively are those who follow nearly the opposite objectives of the kind selected for study in this book. And whether one agrees with Easterly or not, at least his work is based on hard data and not just surveys and interviews.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This book offers insight into great nonprofits and is a good read, too. If you liked Good to Great by Jim Collins, you'll like Forces for Good.