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Forces for Good: The Six Practices of High-Impact Nonprofits / Edition 1
     

Forces for Good: The Six Practices of High-Impact Nonprofits / Edition 1

3.0 7
by Leslie R. Crutchfield
 

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ISBN-10: 0787986127

ISBN-13: 9780787986124

Pub. Date: 10/19/2007

Publisher: Wiley

An innovative guide to how great nonprofits achieve extraordinary social impact. What makes great nonprofits great? Authors Crutchfield and McLeod Grant searched for the answer over several years, employing a rigorous research methodology which derived from books on for-profits like Built to Last. They studied 12 nonprofits that have achieved extraordinary

Overview

An innovative guide to how great nonprofits achieve extraordinary social impact. What makes great nonprofits great? Authors Crutchfield and McLeod Grant searched for the answer over several years, employing a rigorous research methodology which derived from books on for-profits like Built to Last. They studied 12 nonprofits that have achieved extraordinary levels of impact—from Habitat for Humanity to the Heritage Foundation—and distilled six counterintuitive practices that these organizations use to change the world. This book has lessons for all readers interested in creating significant social change, including nonprofit managers, donors and volunteers.

Leslie R. Crutchfield (Washington, D.C.) is a managing director of Ashoka and research grantee of the Aspen Institute. Heather McLeod Grant (Palo Alto, CA) is a nonprofit consultant and advisor to Duke University’s Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship and the Stanford Center for Social Innovation. Crutchfield and Grant were co-founding editors of Who Cares, a national magazine reaching 50,000 readers in circulation between 1993-2000.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780787986124
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
10/19/2007
Series:
J-B US non-Franchise Leadership Series , #36
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
6.48(w) x 9.17(h) x 1.18(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword vii

Preface xi

Acknowledgments xiii

The Authors xvii

Introduction 1

1 Forces for Good 11

2 Advocate and Serve 30

3 Make Markets Work 55

4 Inspire Evangelists 81

5 Nurture Nonprofit Networks 104

6 Master the Art of Adaptation 128

7 Share Leadership 153

8 Sustaining Impact 179

9 Putting It into Practice 207

Appendix A: Research Methodology 225

Appendix B: Field Experts 237

Appendix C: Case Study Research

Guidelines and Questions 241

Appendix D: Key Stakeholders Interview List 245

Appendix E: Organization Profiles 253

Endnotes 285

Additional Resources 295

Index 303

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Forces for Good: The Six Practices of High-Impact Nonprofits 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The method used to select charities to study both made the results too narrow for general use and also assumed a definition of 'effectiveness' that had more to do with changing government policies than with impacting people's lives: no non-American charities, no charities founded before 1964 or after 1994, no church-related charities, only charities with national impact, and then the 'best' were chosen not by an objective criteria but by popularity among charity leaders. Rather than finding and analyzing the most effective charities at helping people, the book analyzes those who've gained the most noteriety for affecting policies. Within that scope, the book's conclusions seem solid, but that scope does not apply to the majority of charitable work. And the assumption that the greatest 'results' come from policy changes runs counter to much more thorough and objective research from people like William Easterly, a long-time World Bank economist who demonstrated in 'The White Man's Burden' that top-down change through governments is most often counter productive. The charities that change lives most effectively are those who follow nearly the opposite objectives of the kind selected for study in this book. And whether one agrees with Easterly or not, at least his work is based on hard data and not just surveys and interviews.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This book offers insight into great nonprofits and is a good read, too. If you liked Good to Great by Jim Collins, you'll like Forces for Good.