Ford County (Limited Edition)

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Overview

In his first collection of short stories John Grisham takes us back to Ford County, Mississippi, the setting of his first novel, A Time to Kill. This limited edition is leatherbound, signed and numbered, with gold stamping and a slipcase.  

Wheelchair-bound Inez Graney and her two older sons, Leon and Butch, take a bizarre road trip through the Mississippi Delta to visit the youngest Graney brother, Raymond, who's been locked away on ...

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Ford County: Stories

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Overview

In his first collection of short stories John Grisham takes us back to Ford County, Mississippi, the setting of his first novel, A Time to Kill. This limited edition is leatherbound, signed and numbered, with gold stamping and a slipcase.  

Wheelchair-bound Inez Graney and her two older sons, Leon and Butch, take a bizarre road trip through the Mississippi Delta to visit the youngest Graney brother, Raymond, who's been locked away on death row for eleven years. It could well be their last visit.

Mack Stafford, a hard-drinking and low-grossing run-of-the-mill divorce lawyer gets a miracle phone call with a completely unexpected offer to settle some old, forgotten cases for more money than he has ever seen. Mack is suddenly bored with the law, fed up with his wife and his life, and makes drastic plans to finally escape.

Quiet, dull Sidney, a data collector for an insurance company, perfects his blackjack skills in hopes of bringing down the casino empire of Clanton's most ambitious hustler, Bobby Carl Leach, who, among other crimes, has stolen Sidney's wife.

Three good ol' boys from rural Ford County begin a journey to the big city of Memphis to give blood to a grievously injured friend. However, they are unable to drive past a beer store as the trip takes longer and longer. The journey comes to an abrupt end when they make a fateful stop at a Memphis strip club.

The Quiet Haven Retirement Home is the final stop for the elderly of Clanton. It's a sad, languid place with little controversy, until Gilbert arrives. Posing as a lowly paid bedpan boy, he is in reality a brilliant stalker with an uncanny ability to sniff out the assets of those "seniors" he professes to love.

One of the hazards of litigating against people in a small town is that one day, long after the trial, you will probably come face-to-face with someone you've beaten in a lawsuit. Lawyer Stanley Wade bumps into an old adversary, a man with a long memory, and the encounter becomes a violent ordeal.

Clanton is rocked with the rumor that the gay son of a prominent family has finally come home, to die. Of AIDS. Fear permeates the town as gossip runs unabated. But in Lowtown, the colored section of Clanton, the young man finds a soul mate in his final days.

Featuring a cast of characters you'll never forget, these stories bring Ford County to vivid and colorful life. Often hilarious, frequently moving, and always entertaining, this collection makes it abundantly clear why John Grisham is our most popular storyteller.

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Editorial Reviews

Carolyn See
Set in a small Mississippi town not unlike the one in which Grisham started practicing law, these seven stories seem so artless that the artlessness turns into an art. They're terrifically charming, if only for this one thing: They start out at a beginning and march straight through to an end. They lack plot twists, literary surprises, authorial showing off…stories that—no matter what your literary scruples—you absolutely can't stop reading.
—The Washington Post
Janet Maslin
Mr. Grisham took seven of his unused plot ideas and turned each of them into a sharp, lean tale free of subplots and padding. At an average length of slightly over 40 pages, these narratives are shorter than novellas but longer than conventional short stories. For a fledgling author, this format would be a tough sell; for Mr. Grisham, it's a vacation from whatever grueling work goes into the construction of fully rigged best sellers. The change invigorates him in ways that show up on the page…His novels sometimes moralize; these short stories don't need to because they transform their agendas into pure, vigorous plot.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
Returning to the setting of his first novel, A Time to Kill, longtime bestseller Grisham presents seven short stories about the residents of Ford County, Miss. Each story explores different themes-mourning, revenge, justice, acceptance, evolution-but all flirt with the legal profession, the staple of (former attorney) Grisham's oeuvre. Fans will be excited to settle back into Grisham's world, and these easily digestible stories don't disappoint, despite their brevity. Full of strong characters, simple but resonant plotlines, and charming Southern accents, this collection is solid throughout; though his literary aspirations may seem quaint, Grisham succeeds admirably in his crowd-pleasing craft while avoiding pat endings or oversimplifying (perhaps best exemplified in "Michael's Room," which finds a lawyer facing the consequences of successfully defending a doctor against a malpractice suit). As always, Grisham balances his lawyerly preoccupations with a deep respect for his undereducated and overlooked characters.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
The Barnes & Noble Review
In the years since his first novel, A Time to Kill, John Grisham said he has often returned to the people and places of that book: "I've had dozens of ideas for Ford County novels, almost all of which peter out for one reason or another...The good stories stick, but they're not always long enough to become novels." His first collection of short fiction, Ford County, collects seven of those tales set in the titular Mississippi region where his characters are "always in the vicinity of trouble." While none of the stories are out-and-out courtroom dramas, most of them are populated with felons, ex-felons, and the kind of lawyers of who are one bad decision away from a jail sentence. In one story, three good ol' boys start driving to Memphis to donate blood for an injured friend, but they're distracted by beer joints and strip clubs along the way. In another, a down-and-out divorce lawyer gets a second chance to make some big money on an old class-action lawsuit. Like his literary predecessors Eudora Welty, Flannery O'Connor, and that other icon from Oxford, Mississippi, William Faulkner, Grisham knows how southerners tick. The characters in Ford County are rendered with great humor and tenderness; even the worst rapscallion and the slimiest scallywag can be loved here in these pages. Ford County may just be Grisham's best book to date. Gone are the problems which have long plagued his novels: paper-thin characters, trite dialogue, and sentences that tangle in a traffic jam of adverbs and adjectives. By winnowing his "ideas" to the shorter form, Grisham has, by necessity, dispensed with the padding and come closer to richer, deeper writing than ever before. --David Abrams
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385533409
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/12/2010
  • Edition description: Signed, Limited Edition
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 6.06 (w) x 9.02 (h) x 1.31 (d)

Meet the Author

John Grisham has written twenty-one previous novels and one work of nonfiction, The Innocent Man, published in 2006. He lives in Virginia and Mississippi.

www.jgrisham.com www.doubleday.com

[RGG logo] Our Readers’ Guides are available at www.doubleday.com/readers

Biography

As a young boy in Arkansas, John Grisham dreamed of being a baseball player. Fortunately for his millions of fans, that career didn't pan out. His family moved to Mississippi in 1967, where Grisham eventually received a law degree from Ole Miss and established a practice in Southaven for criminal and civil law. In 1983, Grisham was elected to the Mississippi House of Representatives, where he served until 1990.

While working as an attorney, Grisham witnessed emotional testimony from the case of a young girl's rape. Naturally inquisitive, Grisham's mind started to wander: what if the terrible crime yielded an equally terrible revenge? These questions of right and wrong were the subject of his first novel, A Time to Kill (1988), written in the stolen moments before and between court appearances. The book wasn't widely distributed, but his next title would be the one to bring him to the national spotlight. The day after he finished A Time to Kill, Grisham began work on The Firm (1991), the story of a whiz kid attorney who joins a crooked law firm. The book was an instant hit, spent 47 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list, and was made into a movie starring Tom Cruise.

With the success of The Firm, Grisham resigned from the Mississippi House of Representatives to focus exclusively on his writing. What followed was a string of bestselling legal thrillers that demonstrated the author's uncanny ability to capture the unique drama of the courtroom. Several of his novels were turned into blockbuster movies.

In 1996, Grisham returned to his law practice for one last case, honoring a promise he had made before his retirement. He represented the family of a railroad worker who was killed on the job, the case went to trial, and Grisham won the largest verdict of his career when the family was awarded more than $650,000.

Although he is best known for his legal thrillers, Grisham has ventured outside the genre with several well-received novels (A Painted House, Bleachers, et al) and an earnest and compelling nonfiction account of small-town justice gone terribly wrong (The Innocent Man). The popularity of these stand-alones proves that Grisham is no mere one-trick pony but a gifted writer with real "legs."

Good To Know

A prolific writer, it takes Grisham an average of six months to complete a novel.

Grisham has the right to approve or reject whoever is cast in movies based on his books. He has even written two screenplays himself: Mickey and The Gingerbread Man.

Baseball is one of Grisham's great loves. He serves as the local Little League commissioner and has six baseball diamonds on his property, where he hosts games.

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    1. Hometown:
      Oxford, Mississippi, and Albemarle County, Virginia
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 8, 1955
    2. Place of Birth:
      Jonesboro, Arkansas
    1. Education:
      B.S., Mississippi State, 1977; J.D., University of Mississippi, 1981
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Fetching Raymond
Mr. McBride ran his upholstery shop in the old icehouse on Lee Street, a few blocks off the square in downtown Clanton. To haul the sofas and chairs back and forth, he used a white Ford cargo van with “McBride Upholstery” stenciled in thick black letters above a phone number and the address on Lee. The van, always clean and never in a hurry, was a common sight in Clanton, and Mr. McBride was fairly well-known because he was the only upholsterer in town. He rarely lent his van to anyone, though the requests were more frequent than he would have liked. His usual response was a polite “No, I have some deliveries.”

He said yes to Leon Graney, though, and did so for two reasons. First, the circumstances surrounding the request were quite unusual, and, second, Leon’s boss at the lamp factory was Mr. McBride’s third cousin. Small-town relationships being what they are, Leon Graney arrived at the upholstery shop as scheduled at four o’clock on a hot Wednesday afternoon in late July.

Most of Ford County was listening to the radio, and it was widely known that things were not going well for the Graney family.

Mr. McBride walked with Leon to the van, handed over the key, and said, “You take care of it, now.”

Leon took the key and said, “I’m much obliged.”

“I filled up the tank. Should be plenty to get you there and back.”

“How much do I owe?"

Mr. McBride shook his head and spat on the gravel beside the van. “Nothing. It’s on me. Just bring it back with a full tank.”

“I’d feel better if I could pay something,” Leon protested.

“No.”

“Well, thank you, then.”

“I need it back by noon tomorrow.”

“It’ll be here. Mind if I leave my truck?” Leon nodded to an old Japanese pickup wedged between two cars across the lot.

“That’ll be fine.”

Leon opened the door and got inside the van. He started the engine, adjusted the seat and the mirrors. Mr. McBride walked to the driver’s door, lit an unfiltered cigarette, and watched Leon. “You know, some folks don’t like this,” he said.

“Thank you, but most folks around here don’t care,” Leon replied. He was preoccupied and not in the mood for small talk.

“Me, I think it’s wrong.”

“Thank you. I’ll be back before noon,” Leon said softly, then backed away and disappeared down the street. He settled into the seat, tested the brakes, slowly gunned the engine to check the power. Twenty minutes later he was far from Clanton, deep in the hills of northern Ford County. Out from the settlement of Pleasant Ridge, the road became gravel, the homes smaller and farther apart. Leon turned in to a short driveway that stopped at a boxlike house with weeds at the doors and an asphalt shingle roof in need of replacement. It was the Graney home, the place he’d been raised along with his brothers, the only constant in their sad and chaotic lives. A jerry-rigged plywood ramp ran to the side door so that his mother, Inez Graney, could come and go in her wheelchair.

By the time Leon turned off the engine, the side door was open and Inez was rolling out and onto the ramp. Behind her was the hulking mass of her middle son, Butch, who still lived with his mother because he’d never lived anywhere else, at least not in the free world. Sixteen of his forty-six years had been behind bars, and he looked the part of the career criminal—long ponytail, studs in his ears, all manner of facial hair, massive biceps, and a collection of cheap tattoos a prison artist had sold him for cigarettes. In spite of his past, Butch handled his mother and her wheelchair with great tenderness and care, speaking softly to her as they negotiated the ramp.

Leon watched and waited, then walked to the rear of the van and opened its double doors. He and Butch gently lifted their mother up and sat her inside the van. Butch pushed her forward to the console that separated the two bucket seats bolted into the floor. Leon latched the wheelchair into place with strips of packing twine someone at McBride’s had left in the van, and when Inez was secure, her boys got settled in their seats. The journey began. Within minutes they were back on the asphalt and headed for a long night.

Inez was seventy-two, a mother of three, grandmother of at least four, a lonely old woman in failing health who couldn’t remember her last bit of good luck. Though she’d considered herself single for almost thirty years, she was not, at least to her knowledge, officially divorced from the miserable creature who’d practically raped her when she was seventeen, married her when she was eighteen, fathered her three boys, then mercifully disappeared from the face of the earth. When she prayed on occasion, she never failed to toss in an earnest request that Ernie be kept away from her, be kept wherever his miserable life had taken him, if in fact his life had not already ended in some painful manner, which was really what she dreamed of but didn’t have the audacity to ask of the Lord. Ernie was still blamed for everything—for her bad health and poverty, her reduced status in life, her seclusion, her lack of friends, even the scorn of her own family. But her harshest condemnation of Ernie was for his despicable treatment of his three sons. Abandoning them was far more merciful than beating them.

By the time they reached the highway, all three needed a cigarette. “Reckon McBride’ll mind if we smoke?” Butch said. At three packs a day he was always reaching for a pocket. “Somebody’s been smokin’ in here,” Inez said. “Smells like a tar pit. Is the air conditioner on, Leon?”

“Yes, but you can’t tell it if the windows are down.”

With little concern for Mr. McBride’s preferences on smoking in his van, they were soon puffing away with the windows down, the warm wind rushing in and swirling about. Once inside the van, the wind had no exit, no other windows, no vents, nothing to let it out, so it roared back toward the front and engulfed the three Graneys, who were staring at the road, smoking intently, seemingly oblivious to everything as the van moved along the county road. Butch and Leon casually flicked their ashes out of the windows. Inez gently tapped hers into her cupped left hand.

“How much did McBride charge you?” Butch asked from the passenger’s seat.

Leon shook his head. “Nothing. Even filled up the tank. Said he didn’t agree with this. Claimed a lot of folks don’t like it.”

“I’m not sure I believe that.”

“I don’t.”

When the three cigarettes were finished, Leon and Butch rolled up their windows and fiddled with the air conditioner and the vents. Hot air shot out and minutes passed before the heat was broken. All three were sweating.

“You okay back there?” Leon asked, glancing over his shoulder and smiling at his mother.

“I’m fine. Thank you. Does the air conditioner work?”

“Yes, it’s gettin’ cooler now.”

“I can’t feel a thang.”

“You wanna stop for a soda or something?”

“No. Let’s hurry along.”

“I’d like a beer,” Butch said, and, as if this was expected, Leon immediately shook his head in the negative and Inez shot forth with an emphatic “No.”

“There’ll be no drinking,” she said, and the issue was laid to rest. When Ernie abandoned the family years earlier, he’d taken nothing but his shotgun, a few clothes, and all the liquor from his private supply. He’d been a violent drunk, and his boys still carried the scars, emotional and physical. Leon, the oldest, had felt more of the brutality than his younger brothers, and as a small boy equated alcohol with the horrors of an abusive father. He had never taken a drink, though with time had found his own vices. Butch, on the other hand, had drunk heavily since his early teens, though he’d never been tempted to sneak alcohol into his mother’s home. Raymond, the youngest, had chosen to follow the example of Butch rather than of Leon.

To shift away from such an unpleasant topic, Leon asked his mother about the latest news from a friend down the road, an old spinster who’d been dying of cancer for years. Inez, as always, perked up when discussing the ailments and treatments of her neighbors, and herself as well. The air conditioner finally broke through, and the thick humidity inside the van began to subside. When he stopped sweating, Butch reached for his pocket, fished out a cigarette, lit it, then cracked the window. The temperature rose immediately. Soon all three were smoking, and the windows went lower and lower until the air was again thick with heat and nicotine.

When they finished, Inez said to Leon, “Raymond called two hours ago.”

This was no surprise. Raymond had been making calls, collect, for days now, and not only to his mother. Leon’s phone was ringing so often that his (third) wife refused to answer it. Others around town were also declining to accept charges.

“What’d he say?” Leon asked, but only because he had to reply. He knew exactly what Raymond had said, maybe not verbatim, but certainly in general.

“Said thangs are lookin’ real good, said he’d probably have to fire the team of lawyers he has now so he can hire another team of lawyers. You know Raymond. He’s tellin’ the lawyers what to do and they’re just fallin’ all over themselves.”

Without turning his head, Butch cut his eyes at Leon, and Leon returned the glance. Nothing was said because words were not necessary.

“Said his new team comes from a firm in Chicago with a thousand lawyers. Can you imagine? A thousand lawyers workin’ for Raymond. And he’s tellin’ ’em what to do.” Another glance between driver and right-side passenger. Inez had cataracts, and her peripheral vision had declined. If she had seen the looks being passed between her two oldest, she would not have been pleased.

“ Said they’ve just discovered some new evidence that shoulda been produced at trial but wasn’t because the cops and the prosecutors covered it up, and with this new evidence Raymond feels real good about gettin’ a new trial back here in Clanton, though he’s not sure he wants it here, so he might move it somewhere else. He’s thinkin’ about somewhere in the Delta because the Delta juries have more blacks and he says that blacks are more sympathetic in cases like this. What do you thank about that, Leon?”

“There are definitely more blacks in the Delta,” Leon said. Butch grunted and mumbled, but his words were not clear.

“Said he don’t trust anyone in Ford County, especially the law and the judges. God knows they’ve never given us a break.”

Leon and Butch nodded in silent agreement. Both had been chewed up by the law in Ford County, Butch much more so than Leon. And though they had pled guilty to their crimes in negotiated deals, they had always believed they were persecuted simply because they were Graneys.

“Don’t know if I can stand another trial, though,” she said, and her words trailed off.

Leon wanted to say that Raymond’s chances of getting a new trial were worse than slim, and that he’d been making noise about a new trial for over a decade. Butch wanted to say pretty much the same thing, but he would’ve added that he was sick of Raymond’s jailhouse bullshit about lawyers and trials and new evidence and that it was past time for the boy to stop blaming everybody else and take his medicine like a man.

But neither said a word.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 620 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(163)

4 Star

(144)

3 Star

(163)

2 Star

(86)

1 Star

(64)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 625 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2009

    John Grisham Stays True!

    Another John Grisham Classic! It's so intense so invigorating! I reluculantly turned the last page.

    11 out of 33 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 19, 2009

    Are You Kidding?

    How in the heck did you finish this book five months before it even come out?

    10 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 7, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Grisham Stories

    First of all, I HAVE read the book, ALL of it, and enjoyed the stories immensely. Ford County seems to be full of interesting people, and Grisham has a smart eye for what makes them interesting. My favorite story is the comeuppance of the lawyer Stanley, but the last story touched my heart. It was a great way to end a fine book.

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2009

    Ford County

    I love books by John Grisham, so I expect all of them to be great. And this one did not disappoint me. It's a book of short stories and I didn't care for the people in the first two stories but that certainly doesn't mean that they don't exist and are like some of the people that I know. But the last story was so enduring and heart felt that it stays with me even now. It was about an older black woman taking care of a younger white man with AIDS. And their short journey together is heart warming and strong.

    7 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 29, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A few gems

    When you write a book of short stories, you'll nail a few and swing and miss on some others. I think John Grisham showed he's not afraid to venture into unknown territory: short stories. This is something Stephen King has nailed. Some stories in Ford County were real page turners that were very exciting and over before I knew it. Others were only 50 pages and each page turn was painstaking. Not a bad product, but I'd prefer he sticks with his legal thrillers.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Smooth silky stories

    These stories go down effortlessly. More than the stories, the characters stand out as rich images appearing in front of the pages. While reading, I felt I was living there, somewhere in Ford County. These are short "short stories". I can't decide if I wanted more stories or longer ones. I have read Grisham's early books but not so much the more recent ones. I recommend this book.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2012

    Not his best

    This 'book' is a collection of short stories. I'm not really enjoying them and would not purchase this book again. I like Grisham's novels, so this book was a disappointment for me.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Starting w "Playing for Pizza," Grisham has become a great storyteller!

    Now I don't tend to read short story collections or anthologies, but in the last month I have enjoyed two very different collections: "Say Your One of Them" and "Ford County." As I wrote earlier "Say..." is a haunting and intense study of life in Africa from that continents children's perspective. I really liked John Grisham's collection of stories, "Ford County". Starting w "Playing for Pizza," Grisham has become a great storyteller! He still displays his love-hate for the legal profession, which we have grown accustomed to in his legal thrillers. Here, however, his characters are more poignant and richly compelling then the leads of his books/movies. Now none of these vignettes could expand to a full length novel ... but that in part is their strength. If the goal is rich flavor and a pleasant aftertaste, a tort is often better than the pie.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 27, 2010

    Great Short Stories

    The short stories are not esoteric. They contain elements of dark humor, social and familial dysfunction, profoundness and familiar circumstances. "Ford County" is an entertaining read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2010

    GREAT read and the short stories were wonderful!

    I throughly enjoy all of John Grishams books, but this read was tooo short but enjoyable. I felt as if I was in Ford County....the stories keep you laughing and crying for some of the characters!

    He saved the best for last! Can't wait to see if he takes one of the short stories and make it an complete book with court room drama and all! Its possible....because many of the stories left you hanging with just your imagination....

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 7, 2010

    Grisham's first short story work.

    This book being Grisham's first short story work it immediately skipped all of his novels to take its place at the top of my list. The small town portrait he paints, the characters full of color, life, humor and uniqueness... I would recommend this book to anyone who has lived in the south. Even if you don't this book is an easy, quick read with original stories that still have a hint of Grishams love for law in it. You really get to bond with the characters and pull for them when they get to a speed bump. My favorite story in this book is Blood Drive.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 13, 2010

    Audio book, Ford County

    I love the voice of John Grisham, but it's a truism that authors should
    not read their own words. With the exception of his telling about the
    lawyer who is abducted and made to witness the results of his defense of the medical profession [outstanding in it's starkness] the other stories sound 'read' instead of being told.
    Worthy and worthwhile work by a respected author.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 13, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A Different Kind of Grisham Book

    While I don't normally like short stories, this one is OK. I love John Grisham's books so I would have preferred a novel from him. But the stories reflect his normal writing style and it was easy to get into the stories. However, they all seemed to have a very sad ending. All of the characters were down on their luck sort of folks. I don't recommend this book to anyone who is looking for a mental or emotional pick-me-up, as the stories all left me feeling rather sad. But again, if you're a Grisham fan and like his writing style, you'll want to add this book to your library.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 19, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    I like this dudes books

    This guys books always remind of a denzel washington movie, if you like grisham you'll love this novel.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 6, 2009

    Gotta love Grisham

    I just got this book on Nov 4th and I have read 2 of the 7 stories, I have a 5 month old son and don't have a lot of time to read or I would already be done with it! I love how Grisham books will just suck you right into them, & this one is no different. It is kind of strange to have a story that takes you 1 hour to read instead of a couple days but it is still a good book, and I would not hesitate to buy it again. I can't wait to finish all stories but then I will have to wait a year for a new book :(

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 18, 2014

    highly recommended you read

    great story and read by one of the best

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2014

    Demons bio

    Gender female rank dicuplus clan the kill

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  • Posted June 1, 2014

    Another GREAT book bu John Grisham

    John Grisham is my favorite writer, I have read most of his book. Ford County was great. I have read it twice already. Once in hard cover and now in my Nook. I recommend it to anyone who enjoys reading great books, just for the joy of reading. Looking forward to John's next winner.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2014

    As usual John Grisham has written an outstanding book.  Hopefull

    As usual John Grisham has written an outstanding book.  Hopefully he will give us more from Ford County in the short story format. 

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  • Posted March 7, 2014

    Very Good Short Stories

    This book contains some short stories that are easy to read, and very enjoyable. John Grisham is an excellent author, and this book of stories will not disappoint.

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