Foreign Affairs

Foreign Affairs

4.0 1
by Tom Waits
     
 

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Tom Waits gives one side of his fifth album, Foreign Affairs, to his more structured, bluesy ballads and the other to his jazz raps. On side one, you get his duet with Bette Midler on the singles-bar dialogue "I Never Talk to Strangers" and his take on his Beat predecessors Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassidy on "Jack & Neal." On side…  See more details below

Overview

Tom Waits gives one side of his fifth album, Foreign Affairs, to his more structured, bluesy ballads and the other to his jazz raps. On side one, you get his duet with Bette Midler on the singles-bar dialogue "I Never Talk to Strangers" and his take on his Beat predecessors Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassidy on "Jack & Neal." On side two, you find the extended observations of "Potter's Field" and "Burma-shave." Waits' voice is becoming ever more gravelly, but his basic musical approach remaines the same, and by this point he'd attracted a steady cult audience that enjoyed his verbal flights and boozy philosopher persona, even as critics began to complain that he was repeating himself.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/11/1990
Label:
Elektra / Wea
UPC:
0075596061827
catalogNumber:
1117
Rank:
26335

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4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
No matter how great, or how awful, any of the other songs on this album might be, Wait's duet with Midler, "I never talk to strangers" is one of the most absolutely gorgeous songs of the 20th Century. Listen to it when you are middle aged, when the kids aren't screaming bloody murder, when the freeway noise is down (but not completely gone). And give yourself the space to listen to two masters of song tear your heart out. It is just unspeakably lovely. Yes, yes, you can look up the lyrics on the web somewhere, but when you've *heard* them sing this song, then you'll know what singing is about. It is somewhat more complex than "What'll I do" by Berlin, but that's another short song that belongs on the short list of Something Done Right in the 20th century.