×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Foreign Direct Investment and Development:The New Policy Agenda for Developing Countries and Economies in Transition
     

Foreign Direct Investment and Development:The New Policy Agenda for Developing Countries and Economies in Transition

by Theodore H. H. Moran, Theodore H. Moran
 

Foreign direct investment (FDI) has grown dramatically and is now the largest and most stable source of private capital for developing countries and economies in transition, accounting for nearly 50 percent of all those flows. Meanwhile, the growing role of FDI in host countries has been accompanied by a change of attitude, from critical wariness toward

Overview

Foreign direct investment (FDI) has grown dramatically and is now the largest and most stable source of private capital for developing countries and economies in transition, accounting for nearly 50 percent of all those flows. Meanwhile, the growing role of FDI in host countries has been accompanied by a change of attitude, from critical wariness toward multinational corporations to sometimes uncritical enthusiasm about their role in the development process. What are the most valuable benefits and opportunities that foreign firms have to offer? What risks and dangers do they pose? Beyond improving the micro and macroeconomic "fundamentals" in their own countries and building an investment-friendly environment, do authorities in host countries need a proactive (rather than passive) policy toward FDI?

In one of the most comprehensive studies on FDI in two decades, Theodore Moran synthesizes evidence drawn from a wealth of case literature to assess policies toward FDI in developing countries and economies in transition. His focus is on investment promotion, domestic content mandates, export-performance requirements, joint-venture requirements, and technology-licensing mandates. The study demonstrates that there is indeed a large, energetic, and vital role for host authorities to play in designing policies toward FDI but that the needed actions differ substantially from conventional wisdom on the topic. Dr. Moran offers a pathbreaking agenda for host governments, aimed at maximizing the benefits they can obtain from FDI while minimizing the dangers, and suggests how they might best pursue this agenda.

Editorial Reviews

Raymond Vernon
Ted Moran... with rare objectivity and commendable thoroughness... point[s] the way to policies that could be mutually beneficial to both governments and enterprises.

Booknews
Explores three related issues of foreign direct investment (FDI) from the point of view of the host country: benefits and risks; the effectiveness of international markets in providing FDI to developing countries; and the kinds of policies that allow countries to capture the benefits and avoid the risks of FDI. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780881322583
Publisher:
Peterson Institute for International Economics
Publication date:
01/28/1999
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
191
Product dimensions:
6.08(w) x 9.03(h) x 0.43(d)

What People are Saying About This

Vernon
Ted Moran has performed a huge service for multinational enterprises and for governments in the developing world that do business with them. With rare objectivity and commendable thoroughness, he has pulled together a sprawling literature that analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of different governmental approaches toward the multinationals, pointing the way to policies that could be mutually beneficial to both governments and enterprises.
-- Clarence Dillon Professor of International Affairs Emeritus, Harvard University, and author of In the Hurricane's Eye: the Troubled Prospects of Multinational Enterprises,

Meet the Author

Theodore H. Moran, nonresident senior fellow, has been associated with the Peterson Institute since 1998. He holds the Marcus Wallenberg Chair at the School of Foreign Service in Georgetown University. He is the founder of the Landegger Program in International Business Diplomacy at the university and serves as director there. He also serves as a member of Huawei's International Advisory Council. From 2007 to 2013 he served as Associate to the US National Intelligence Council on international business issues.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews