The Foreshadowing [NOOK Book]

Overview

It is 1915 and the First World War has only just begun.

17 year old Sasha is a well-to-do, sheltered-English girl. Just as her brother Thomas longs to be a doctor, she wants to nurse, yet girls of her class don't do that kind of work. But as the war begins and the hospitals fill with young soldiers, she gets a chance to help. But working in the hospital confirms what Sasha has suspected--she can see when someone is going to die. Her premonitions show her the brutal horrors on ...

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The Foreshadowing

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Overview

It is 1915 and the First World War has only just begun.

17 year old Sasha is a well-to-do, sheltered-English girl. Just as her brother Thomas longs to be a doctor, she wants to nurse, yet girls of her class don't do that kind of work. But as the war begins and the hospitals fill with young soldiers, she gets a chance to help. But working in the hospital confirms what Sasha has suspected--she can see when someone is going to die. Her premonitions show her the brutal horrors on the battlefields of the Somme, and the faces of the soldiers who will die. And one of them is her brother Thomas.

Pretending to be a real nurse, Sasha goes behind the front lines searching for Thomas, risking her own life as she races to find him, and somehow prevent his death.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Sedgwick's (The Dark Horse) powerful and haunting WWI story probes ideas of death and healing, fate and free will. Alexandra (Sasha) has the gift, or curse, of foreseeing a person's death. "I was five when I first saw the future," the book begins, as Sasha describes knowing that her friend Clare would soon die. Her next vision comes when she turns 17, and then they occur frequently. She tries talking to her parents about her gift, but it makes them uncomfortable, and they dismiss it. WW I rages in France, and Sasha volunteers as a nurse; she foresees the death of several hospitalized soldiers. Then she dreams her eldest brother Edgar will die in the war; while touching a postcard he sent, she hears his voice say, "I must go now. I am dead." Some time later, Sasha experiences a vivid dream where she sees her beloved brother Tom, also a soldier, being shot. Sasha secretly travels to France hoping to prevent Tom's death. Threre she meets Hoodoo Jack, who can also foresee the future, and who helps her try and save Tom, even as he tries to convince Sasha that her vision will prevail. Readers will be immediately drawn in to Sasha's intimate retelling of her horrific experiences as she recounts her tale from her first vision to her last. Ages 10-up. (June) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
VOYA
Certain novels have bravura openings. This book, opening with "I was five when I first saw the future," is one such. It is unfortunate that the rest of the narrative does not live up to the grab-you-by-the-throat beginning, in large part because of the portentous voice of the protagonist, seventeen-year-old Sasha, who is cursed with the ability to see death. The year is 1915, and Sasha identifies with her middle brother, pacifistic Tom, who wants to be a doctor and does not want to go to war. Her oldest brother, Edgar, and her father, a rigid, controlling doctor, both insist that enlistment is the only patriotic option. Edgar enlists, but Tom does not, and Sasha, also wanting to help, convinces her father to let her try nursing. Throughout, Sasha continues to see who will live and who will die, an ability denied by her family. When Edgar dies and Tom enlists in despair, Sasha sees Tom's death by gunfire. She is determined to save him, manages to escape to France, and begins the search for her brother. A great deal of accurate historical information about World War I in France is incorporated into this briskly plotted novel. Page-turner it is, despite the histrionic narrative voice and some plot devices that are a bit contrived. The ending is surprising and raises questions of free will and fate, but the novel will appeal mostly to literary girls. For older teens who are interested in World War I, Robert Graves's classic Goodbye to All That (Gardners, 2004) is a sounder and more wrenching account of a horrifying situation. VOYA CODES: 3Q 2P M J S (Readable without serious defects; For the YA with a special interest in the subject; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High,defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2006, Wendy Lamb Books/Random House, 288p., and PLB Ages 11 to 18.
—Ann Welton
Children's Literature
At the start of World War One, Sasha is a seventeen-year-old girl whose family has been divided by the conflict. Sasha's brother, Edgar, has joined the British army as an infantry captain. Her other brother, Tom, has chosen to stay at home and continue his medical studies. Within Sasha's family, deep fissures have been created by these decisions. For Sasha, her youthful energy is channeled into working as a volunteer nurse. For days Sasha tends to the sick and wounded soldiers who are shipped back to the hospital where she works. But all through the days of her youthful life Sasha has a hidden talent that plagues her: Sasha has foresight and sometimes she can see a person's future, and even death. When Tom finally does join the army, Sasha is stricken by the recurring vision of his death. She decides she must do something to stop this tragic event. Her efforts lead her to the battlefields of France where she finds that what seems clear in a vision may well have a twisted reality. The Foreshadowing is a tautly written thriller set in a bitter time in European history. Written with a deft and compelling hand, this historical piece combines a gripping story, vivid characters, and a keen eye for accuracy. The Foreshadowing is a fine novel that tells the story of a brave hearted girl whose "gift" leads to results that even she could never have predicted. 2006, Wendy Lamb Books/Random House, Ages 14 up.
—Greg M. Romaneck
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-This is a coherent and well-developed historical novel that, despite elements of the paranormal, paints a very real picture of the era. Seventeen-year-old Alexandra has foreseen the death of others since she was a child, but no one believes her or wants to talk about her uncanny ability. As World War I breaks out, she is tormented by almost daily visions, nightmares, and premonitions, yet she strives to become a nurse, despite her father's objections. Alexandra's brothers both end up on the front lines. Having foreseen the death of Edgar before the telegram arrives, the teen makes plans to escape her confined life in Brighton and make her way to France to try to find and save her other brother, Tom. This first-person narrative develops the characters well and readers will empathize with Alexandra and her struggles. She challenges her family's views and strikes out on her own in order to make a difference. This novel provides the female perspective of war and the chaos and trauma that nurses dealt with, along with women's role in society in England around 1915.-Dylan Thomarie, Johnstown High School, NY Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Long before WWI changes the world of privilege she inhabits, Sasha's family tries to deny her ability to see death coming. Since her father is a doctor, Sasha persuades him that she can help in the hospital wards, but several experiences of knowing that a patient is not going to make it convince her that her power is real. Neither father, mother nor brothers want this to be true, and denial pervades the house as both brothers make their individual choices about participating in the war. The work feels long, but is actually full of white space, and reads quickly. Sedgwick uses grammar and word choice that convey a time past, yet the first-person narration carries an immediacy as readers see Sasha attempting to prevent that which she has foreseen, to a final devastating conclusion. References to Cassandra, who knew what would befall Troy, help to make the awfulness of knowing the future less personal and more mythic. Fighting against what Sasha knows to be destiny creates a plot that explores fate and manages to combine surprise and inevitability in equal measure. Brilliant. (Fiction. YA)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307433886
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 12/18/2007
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 542,045
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Marcus Sedgwick is the award-winning author of Floodland, Witch Hill, The Dark Horse, The Book of Dead Days, and The Dark Flight Down. He is a sales representative for Walker Books in London. The author lives in England.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Read an Excerpt

The Foreshadowing


By Marcus Sedgwick

Random House

Marcus Sedgwick
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0385746466


Chapter One

It is 1915 and the First World War has only just begun.

Seventeen-year-old Sasha is a well-to-do, sheltered English girl. Just as her brother Thomas longs to be a doctor, she wants to nurse, yet girls of her class don't do that kind of work. But as the war begins and the hospitals fill with young soldiers, she gets a chance to help. But working in the hospital confirms what Sasha has suspected--she can see when someone is going to die. Her premonitions show her the brutal horrors on the battlefields of the Somme, and the faces of the soldiers who will die. And one of them is her brother Thomas.

Pretending to be a real nurse, Sasha goes behind the front lines searching for Thomas, risking her own life as she races to find him, and somehow prevent his death.


Excerpted from The Foreshadowing by Marcus Sedgwick Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 19 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2007

    Lumpy.

    As usual for one of Marcus Sedgwick's books, the plot is well-crafted and inspiring. There is an ongoing feeling that the author knows what he is talking about. However, the narrative style is desperately off-putting. There is plenty of description but it somehow fails to strike a chord with your imagination and the book comes across as completely colourless. Telling the story with a certain simplicity can make it very much more moving, but as this is done all the way through the book it starts to become dreary and Alexandra's perspective loses credibility. However, a certain style will appeal to some and not to others: therefore if you enjoyed other books by Marcus Sedgwick, it is likely you will enjoy this one.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2011

    AMAZING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    You have to read it to belive it...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 16, 2011

    AMAZING

    If u read the sample, itll be boring. BUY IT!! Everythng is great and the sample skips out. Buy it from scholastic, only $1.00

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 4, 2008

    The Foreshadowing by Marcus Sedgwick

    The Foreshadowing is a tragic story about one girl trying to face the world with a secret no on would believe is true. Based on World War I, one young girl and her family must deal with their eldest son,Edgar, going off to the war to fight. One christmas the family recieves a letter home from Edgar wishing his family well, but the young girl,Alexandra, knows this will be the last they talk to their beloved son and brother. She has seen it all, his tragic death, and how it has happened. This is not the first time Alexandra has had to deal with seeing deaths of people around her. This power was discovered when she was five years old,and predicted her best friends death,but at such a young age no one had believed her. Now she is grown up. The war continues and her second brother,Thomas, is old enough to fight. Putting his career behind him, he sets off to France, in the hope of ending the war. Alexandra is scared, she has seen his death in a dream.Fearing she may loose another brother, she runs away to France in search of Jack, in hope that she will be able to save him,hoping it is not too late. With the help of Jack, a lonley mail carrier, she sets off on, what maybe be a hopeless, journey. <BR/>Read The Foreshadowing by Marcus Sedgwick to learn about the twisted story of a young girl with a horrible destination.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Very good

    Alexandra's (Sasha) story is very deep and moving. <BR/><BR/>A suspenseful story with kind characters.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2008

    The BOOK

    This book was so suspensful. I couldn't even stop reading to play video games. This book will blow your mind. I recomend this book to everyone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2008

    I couldnt stop reading it

    I saw the cover of this book and wondered what itd be about. I saw wings (I like wings), and I saw barbed wires. This book wasnt scarey, but gave me a creepy chill down my spine at times. The main things I could pull out from this is...war, nurses, and a girl with premonitions. She only has premonitions of death and hasnt tried to stop any, but one day she gets a glimpse of her brothers future. That changes things for her. She meets a guy who also has premonitions, and although they may disagree at times, they always pulled through. She was a voluntary nurse, but disguised herself as an impostor to get a ride to see her brother at the war....you just gotta read it yourself. :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2007

    a reviewer

    this book definitely does a good job of keeping you in suspense. i thought i knew how it would end, but i was wrong. props for that!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2006

    Great Read..Could not put down!

    I loved this book. It is a real 'page-turner'. You feel like you are in the story and feeling with Sasha, Tom and Edgar. At the end, I was crying because it was such a great book. I loved how Sedgwick made the raven a key point. I won't give away the ending because it is a great point but keep a close eye on that bird!.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2006

    one of the best

    i loved this book from the begining! i couldn't put it down until i had finished reading it!

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    Posted February 20, 2010

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    Posted November 1, 2008

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    Posted May 14, 2011

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    Posted January 19, 2010

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