Forever the Wild Mare

Forever the Wild Mare

4.4 7
by Ann Cottrell Free
     
 

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This exciting, award-winning, ground breaking, all-age story has helped to stimulate interest in natural habitat zoos, endangered species, Buddhism, prehistoric cave paintings, ways to curb juvenile crime, respect for nature and animals, and U.S. Congress' law-making. Set in the nation's capital, the book makes excursions into Central Asia and pre-historic Europe.

Overview

This exciting, award-winning, ground breaking, all-age story has helped to stimulate interest in natural habitat zoos, endangered species, Buddhism, prehistoric cave paintings, ways to curb juvenile crime, respect for nature and animals, and U.S. Congress' law-making. Set in the nation's capital, the book makes excursions into Central Asia and pre-historic Europe. First published by Dodd, Mead, 1963.

Jebby Andrews, a transplanted junior high student, tries to re-connect with his rural Shenandoah County, Virginia roots by becoming friends with the lonely Mongolian wild horse at the close-by National Zoo. An endangered species (Equus przewalski) this ancient breed has remained unrideable since days of the prehistoric cave paintings at Lascaux, France. Jebby wants to liberate the mare from her barren paddock and also ride her despite warnings from a wise Tibetan lama and kilted Scottish Central Asian explorer-ecologist who fear for the boy, who is already being harassed by a gang of roaming boys.

Jebby continues to seek his twin goals, leading to exciting midnight adventures at the Zoo and Washington's famed Rock Creek Park. This involves a U.S. senator, his young daughter, a Mongolian yurt, a Bactrian camel, redemption of the gang-leader and Jebby's fate as a bronco buster.

This fast-paced, well-researched prophetic novel has a timeless, close-to-nature quality. It has brought enthusiastic response from students of all ages. Its author was a founder of the Friends of the National Zoo and a well known nature and animal protection writer.

Editorial Reviews

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, William O. Douglas
In Forever the Wild Mare, Ann Cottrell Free combines a unique setting, interesting characters, and moving plot to illustrate in youthful terms, what can be done in the Nation's Capital to provide a constructive program for the city's restless youth, while revitalizing a decrepit zoo...there is a wealth of factual information in this book of fiction - from remote areas of the world through the pages of history and back to Embassy Row in Washington, D.C...adults and youth alike will enjoy.
Helen A. Monsell
For horse lovers, be they boys or girls, this is a must. For the smaller group of camel lovers it will also be delightful reading. Moreover, if you like Scotsmen, Buddhist lamas, United States Senators, delinquent boys or moral lessons - 'such here you'll find.' The fact is that, with the prodigality of the beginner in the children's field, the author has crammed enough themes, history, characters and 'moralitez' into one book to provide fodder for a whole bookshelf.
J.R. McAdory Jr.
Set in the National Zoo and Rock Creek Park, with the nation's capital crowding around, Free has done a really fantastic job of creating a sort of mystical global atmosphere that ranges from the plains of Central Asia, to the soft hills of Virginia to the rugged Scottish Highlands.
Mildred Ladner
It won't take readers long to understand why the publishers of this novel awarded it the Boys' Life writing award.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012389060
Publisher:
Flying Fox Press
Publication date:
04/16/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Ann Cottrell Free was born in Richmond, Virginia in 1916. A graduate of Barnard College, she became the first woman Washington correspondent for the New York Herald Tribune, Newsweek and the Chicago Sun, where she covered First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and wartime-Washington. After the war she served in China as a special correspondent for the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration and in Europe for the Marshall Plan. She later wrote for the North American Newspaper Alliance and was a contributing columnist for the Washington Post, the Washington Star, other newspapers and syndicates. In 1963 she received the Albert Schweitzer Medal from the Animal Welfare Institute for her investigative animal reporting. The publication of Forever the Wild Mare brought her many other honors, including the Dodd, Mead Boy’s Life Writing Award. She initiated the establishment of the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge and presented testimony on numerous animal protection issues to Congressional committees. She was also a founder of the Friends of the National Zoo. She authored Animals, Nature and Albert Schweitzer, Since Silent Spring: Our Debt to Albert Schweitzer and Rachel Carson and a volume of poetry, No Room, Save in the Heart. She received the Rachel Carson Legacy Award in 1988 and in 1996 was inducted into the Virginia Communications Hall of Fame. Her oral histories are in the collections of Columbia University and the National Press Club. In 2004 she died at the age of 88 in Washington D.C. A year later, the National Press Club Ann Cottrell Free Animal Reporting Award was established to inspire and encourage other journalists to follow in her footsteps. More information can be found at www.anncottrellfree.org

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Forever the Wild Mare 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Looks wierd
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
C
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sneaks out of the nursery
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Tigerpaw!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He made a nest.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read,read,read,READ!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :)