Forget-Her-Nots
  • Forget-Her-Nots
  • Forget-Her-Nots

Forget-Her-Nots

3.6 14
by Amy Brecount White
     
 

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Something—some power—is blooming inside Laurel. She can use flowers to do things. Like bringing back lost memories. Or helping her friends ace tests. Or making people fall in love.

Laurel suspects her newfound ability has something to do with an ancient family secret, one that her mother meant to share with Laurel when the time was right. But then

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Overview

Something—some power—is blooming inside Laurel. She can use flowers to do things. Like bringing back lost memories. Or helping her friends ace tests. Or making people fall in love.

Laurel suspects her newfound ability has something to do with an ancient family secret, one that her mother meant to share with Laurel when the time was right. But then time ran out.

Clues and signs and secret messages seem to be all around Laurel at Avondale School, where her mother had also boarded as a student. Can Laurel piece everything together quickly enough to control her power, which is growing more potent every day? Or will she set the stage for the most lovestruck, infamous prom in the history of the school?

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Nicole Jacques
Filled with drama, Forget-Her-Nots incorporates intimacy with magic to create an irresistible plot line for young romance lovers. Each character is portrayed in a realistic light. Based on an intriguing subject, the story is never monotonous yet offers little substantial material to contemplate. The ending is satisfying but also slightly predictable. Any female teenager looking for a quick and eventful read should consider this novel prime choice. Reviewer: Nicole Jacques, Teen Reviewer
VOYA - Marla K. Unruh
A tingly dizziness courses through Laurel as she inhales the fragrance of a small nosegay left by her dorm room door. Stunned by the effect of the flowers and mystified by the lack of a note with them, she rushes on with a larger bouquet she has prepared for her report on the Victorian symbolism of flowers. This is the day that a class from a nearby boys' school will visit her class in the all-girl Avondale School. After Laurel explains the language of flowers for sending messages of love, students vie for her bouquet, but she hands it to "Spinster" Spencer, her teacher. Miss Spencer is married soon after, and Laurel is besieged with requests for "tussie-mussies," or message bouquets. As Laurel explores her inherited magic in using flowers, she finds herself wanting to help and to retaliate. Authentic teen dialogue and lovely sensory images are among the strengths of this novel, and weaving in the historic symbolism of flowers adds a refreshing charm. Teens will relate to Laurel's struggles to make friends in a new school while coping with the death of her mother. The abundance of imagery slows down the pace, however, and the effects of Laurel's flowers and herbs on others stretch credulity just a bit. Recommend this book to younger teenagers wanting a lighter read. Reviewer: Marla K. Unruh
Children's Literature - Mary Quattlebaum
At the garden-bright boarding school attended by her deceased mother, Laurel begins to discover a latent power: flower power. Love, hatred and strength all bloom when Laurel brings together plants such as gardenias, basil and cedar. But when a rare, potent orchid is stolen from the conservatory, Laurel must track down and return its blossom before it can intoxicate the entire prom—and mess with the guy she likes. Mystery, magic, flower lore and a conservatory ghost all come together in this beguiling bouquet of a novel by Amy Brecount White. Reviewer: Mary Quattlebaum
Publishers Weekly
The mysteries of Victorian flower lore pervade White’s debut, in which 14-year-old Laurel strives to shape a new life after her mother’s death from cancer. Hoping a change of locale will help her grief, Laurel enrolls in the boarding school her mother attended. Once at Avondale, she discovers a bewildering ability to stir up emotions by creating floral bouquets, and she’s soon in demand by students with a variety of motives. Following the definitions in a serendipitously found book, The Language of Flowers, and reciting her mantra (“Bright cut flowers, leaves of green, bring about what I have seen”), Laurel tries to understand and properly use her gift, while coping with typical teenage dilemmas and uncovering her family’s flower-related history. White aptly renders big and small dramas against the backdrop of Laurel’s struggles with her “flower power,” and deftly walks the line between reality and fantasy without crossing it. A delicate sense of magical possibility and reverence for the natural world help elevate White’s story from a typical prep-school drama into something more memorable. Ages 12–up. (Mar.)
Kirkus Reviews
Freshman Laurel, who is grieving her mother's recent death, has flower power. As she explains at the beginning of the book, each flower has a different meaning, and young men and ladies used to communicate via small bouquets. Thanks to her expertise, Laurel gains a reputation as a florist to the lovelorn-but there's more to it than that. Not realizing the full potential of her talents, she sends the student body into a frenzy of lustful crushes. With the guidance of a teacher, Laurel learns that she is a Flowerspeaker, one of a long line of women who have special talents with flowers. Her Flowerspeaker talents bring Laurel closer to her estranged grandmother and help in healing the loss she and her father both feel. The boarding-school setting and strong thematic ties to the Victorian era give this book a gothic feeling. Laurel is an admirable heroine, always supportive of her friends but never a pushover. A unique twist on romantic paranormal mystery, this is sure to appeal to girls who have outgrown fairy princesses but aren't ready for sexy vampires. (Supernatural. 12 & up)
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up—Laurel, 14, is a new student at her recently deceased mother's alma mater, a Virginia girls' boarding school. She prepares a presentation on the Victorian language of flowers for her English class and finds that she has a special affinity for the subject. Strong flower scents, some of them undetectable to anyone else, suddenly make her feel "spinny, dizzy, and tingly." If she recites a little verse her mother used to say, "Bright cut flowers, leaves of green, bring about what I have seen," the flowers seem to actualize the sentiments they are meant to symbolize. This is a fine thing when the tussie-mussie Laurel makes for her class presentation apparently causes her teacher, known to the students as Spinster Spenser, to fall in love and marry, but not quite so benign when the bouquets she makes for classmates fall into the wrong hands and attract or repel unintended recipients. Sylvia Suarez, a science teacher, keeper of the school conservatory, and Laurel's mother's onetime classmate, gradually informs the teen that they are both part of a society of "Flowerspeakers," a group that also included Laurel's mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. For centuries, these women have possessed powers similar to Laurel's and will now help her learn to use her own gift. Although the fantasy elements of this novel are not convincing or successful, the book will appeal to fans of boarding-school stories and gentle teen romances.—Ginny Gustin, Sonoma County Library System, Santa Rosa, CA

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061672989
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/02/2010
Pages:
374
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.40(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

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