Forget Tomorrow

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Although they've been away from the recording studio for the better part of four years, these Georgia-bred art-popsters haven't lost their singular grip on off-kilter ethno-delia. Forget Tomorrow, like all of Macha's releases, is steeped in unusual instrumentation -- the hammered dulcimer that resonates through "Paper Tiger," the clattering Indonesian percussion that drives "Do the Inevitable." But unlike some of their similarly minded peers, the band don't come across as dilettantish, only endlessly inquisitive. As such, they're willing and able to fuse those globe-spanning instincts to downright catchy -- if somewhat purposefully disjointed -- post-rock rhythms like ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Although they've been away from the recording studio for the better part of four years, these Georgia-bred art-popsters haven't lost their singular grip on off-kilter ethno-delia. Forget Tomorrow, like all of Macha's releases, is steeped in unusual instrumentation -- the hammered dulcimer that resonates through "Paper Tiger," the clattering Indonesian percussion that drives "Do the Inevitable." But unlike some of their similarly minded peers, the band don't come across as dilettantish, only endlessly inquisitive. As such, they're willing and able to fuse those globe-spanning instincts to downright catchy -- if somewhat purposefully disjointed -- post-rock rhythms like those that propel the almost Faint-like "Smash and Grab." That's one of the few tracks that find the trio working up a real sweat; most of Forget Tomorrow -- like the ethereal instrumental "Sub II" -- glides along with a sleek precision that skirts soullessness but delivers a heady dose of sonic comfort.
All Music Guide - Heather Phares
Four years since their last release -- the wonderful collaboration Macha Loved Bedhead -- and five years after their last proper album, See It Another Way, came out, Macha returned with Forget Tomorrow. The band attempts to make up for lost time by incorporating the synth pop and punk-funk trends of the early 2000s into the fusion of indie rock and pan-cultural music that made the band so distinctive-sounding in the '90s. However, these nods to recent and current musical fads end up detracting from Macha's sound as often as they enhance it; "Forget Tomorrow" itself borrows from both dream pop and synth pop, but sounds forced and hollow, especially compared to artists like Dykehouse, whose Midrange treads similar ground with more vitality and imagination. "Do the Inevitable"'s punk-funk vamps work a little better with Macha's already established aesthetic, allowing the band to indulge its fondness for exotic percussion in a way that's new for them. Forget Tomorrow is also hampered by several interludes, like "While the People Sleep" and "D-D-D," that sound unfinished and neither tie the album together nor embellish it. Thankfully, the album gets weirder and better as it progresses, with tracks like "Paper Tiger" and "Calming Passengers" offering a happy medium between the extremes of their new and old sounds. "Now Disappearing" is a particular highlight, creating a lovely and slightly unreal atmosphere out of synths, hammered dulcimer, and what sounds like a little girl singing backward. The gorgeous Asian strings and gamelan underpinnings of "Sub II" make it another standout track; even if its guitars are a little overblown, it's still more artful than the first half of Forget Tomorrow might suggest. Likewise, "No Surprise Party" closes the album much more successfully than it begins: despite the slightly cheesy phased vocals, it's an unusual mix of kinetic basslines, fireworks, and shimmering Asian instrumentation. Still, it's not really surprising that the more unusual moments on Forget Tomorrow are among the album's best, since Macha's uniquely inclusive perspective was a big part of what made their earlier albums so good. Despite its flaws, Forget Tomorrow has enough beauty and creativity to suggest that Macha's best music may still be ahead of the band.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 8/3/2004
  • Label: Jet Set Records
  • UPC: 604978005724
  • Catalog Number: 780057

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Macha Primary Artist
Andy Baker Voices, Guest Appearance
Andy LeMaster Chimes, Hand Clapping, Low Vocals, Guest Appearance
Josh McKay Vocals
Mischo McKay Drums
Kai Riedl Track Performer
Tall Paul Hankins Viola
Daniel Rickard Guitar, Drums, Vibes, Guest Appearance
Technical Credits
Andy Baker Engineer
Andy LeMaster Engineer
Glenn Schick Mastering
Josh McKay Composer, Producer, Instrumentation
Mischo McKay Composer
Kai Riedl Composer, Producer
Daniel Rickard Composer, Engineer
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