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Forgiveness: Breaking the Chain of Hate
     

Forgiveness: Breaking the Chain of Hate

by Michael Henderson
 

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How could survivors of the Burma Road, the Siberian Gulag, or Nazi atrocities forgive those who harmed them? How can representatives of entire populations--Australian Aborigines, African Americans, and black South Africans--be reconciled with whites who exploited them? And how can the offenders find the grace to apologize?

Michael Henderson writes about dozens of

Overview

How could survivors of the Burma Road, the Siberian Gulag, or Nazi atrocities forgive those who harmed them? How can representatives of entire populations--Australian Aborigines, African Americans, and black South Africans--be reconciled with whites who exploited them? And how can the offenders find the grace to apologize?

Michael Henderson writes about dozens of remarkable people of many nations and faiths who have, by repentance and forgiveness, been able to break the chain of hate through repentance and forgiveness.

Editorial Reviews

First Things
Taking his cue from Philip Yancey's observation that the only thing harder than forgiveness is the alternative, the author draws on stories from South Africa, Northern Ireland, and other troubled places--including his own life and that of others--to demonstrate the liberating power of 'forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us.
Crindalyn Stevens
Forgiveness, Breaking the Chain of Hate" focuses on the 'forgiveness movement' in which leaders of countries or organizations ask forgiveness from those that their countries have injured. An example is how survivors of the Siberian gulag or Nazi atrocities forgave those who hurt them or how representatives of entire populations such as the Australian Aborigines can be reconciled with whites who exploited them.

Author Michael Henderson answers why and how they forgave and writes about dozens of remarkable people in many nations who have been able to break the chain of hate. Repentance may seem old-fashioned, but in the eyes of Henderson, it may be ready for a comeback.
The Daily Astorian/Coast Weekend

Library Journal
First published in 1999, this compelling international look at forgiveness has been updated in light of the September 11 terrorist attacks. Henderson, a journalist and associate of Moral Re-Armament (an international network recognized by the UN), persuasively argues that the world needs less recrimination and retribution and more dialog and reparation. He discusses the importance of official apologies in situations like apartheid in South Africa, colonialism in Australia, and the ongoing conflicts in Northern Ireland and the Middle East. To show that international peace is a possibility, he cites examples of victims of war, terrorism, and harsh regimes transcending their initial hatred of their oppressors. Timely and well written, this important work offers a challenging worldview. Recommended for both public and academic libraries. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781581511154
Publisher:
BookPartners, Inc.
Publication date:
03/01/2002
Edition description:
Revised
Pages:
189
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.68(h) x 0.68(d)

What People are Saying About This

Brian Frost
His book abounds in stories which former Archbishop Tutu regards as eloquent testimony to the power of forgiveness in the lives of individuals and communities, as well as between and within nations. What is clear from Henderson's book is that remarkable things are occurring in all continents, from Kim Phuc, as a young girl captured on camera fleeing naked down the highway from her napalm-bombed village during the Vietnam war, who met and forgave the American pilot of the plane which dropped the bomb, to President Yeltsin speaking at the reburial of the Star Nicholas11. At the reburial he suggested that as the 21st century approached it must be entered into with a spirit of repentance and reconciliation.
— Brian Frost, Methodist Recorder
Desmond Tutu
A deeply moving and eloquent testimony to the power of forgiveness in the life of individuals, of communities, and between and within nations. It effects change -- a powerful book.
— (Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Nobel Peace Prize laureate)

Meet the Author

Michael Henderson is a journalist, broadcaster and author of nine books. He recently returned to his native England after 22 years in the USA.

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