The Forgotten Affairs of Youth (Isabel Dalhousie Series #8)

( 12 )

Overview

In this eighth installment in Alexander McCall Smith’s captivating Isabel Dalhousie series, our irrepressible heroine tries to untangle complex questions about both the past and the present.
 
Isabel’s new friend Jane Cooper, a visiting Australian philosopher who was adopted as a small child, has come to Edinburgh searching for information about her biological father. Naturally, Isabel is more than happy to offer her services. At the same ...

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The Forgotten Affairs of Youth (Isabel Dalhousie Series #8)

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Overview

In this eighth installment in Alexander McCall Smith’s captivating Isabel Dalhousie series, our irrepressible heroine tries to untangle complex questions about both the past and the present.
 
Isabel’s new friend Jane Cooper, a visiting Australian philosopher who was adopted as a small child, has come to Edinburgh searching for information about her biological father. Naturally, Isabel is more than happy to offer her services. At the same time, she must find time for her own concerns: her young son Charlie, who’s leaving babyhood further behind each day; her housekeeper Grace, who has recently begun getting financial advice from her spiritualist; her niece Cat, who’s in a new relationship, and the most pressing question of all: when and how Isabel and Jamie will finally get married. As she investigates the forgotten affairs of youth Isabel begins to wonder what those affairs lead to in the present, and in the process she discovers a whole new understanding of the meaning of family.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
You needn’t be a series-long admirer of Isabel Dalhousie to be beguiled by this curious philosopher and casual sleuth. In this eighth installment—with the ruminating Edinburgh heroine steeped in devoted motherhood, impending marriage, and office and family intrigue—it might even help to be a stranger to her more daring exploits; here, No. 1 Ladies’ Detectives Agency series phenom McCall Smith has his quirky gumshoe stalking moral intrigue more doggedly than mystery. It’s Isabel’s mission to help a visiting Australian philosopher find her father after her adoptive parents and birth mother die. The task is deceptively easy and never comes close to matching the confounding mysteries of Isabel’s niece’s fickle heart, the wisdom of ratting her out to health officials for a batch of toxic mushrooms, the impermanence of the greatest love of her life, or how to raise her adorable toddler with fiancé Jamie. Isabel believes only the examined life is worth living, and fearlessly so: “she would never accept things as they were. That was what made her do what she did—practice philosophy—and what made her... do battle for understanding, for sympathy, for love; in small ways... that cumulatively made a difference.” It makes Isabel a heroine worth following, even through this more quiet, reflective foray. (Dec.)
From the Publisher
Praise for The Forgotten Affairs of Youth

“No matter the philosophical twist [Isabel] puts on her actions, it comes back to doing the right thing. McCall Smith has produced an endearing, intelligent and kindly character, which leads a reader to imagining him as having similarly charming traits, both human and literary.” —Charleston Post and Courier

“Because both Isabel and Jane are philosophers, discussions on the nature of truth also arise—especially when that elusive creature seems to be antithetical to love. In McCall Smith’s trademark voice, these conflicts play out in civil conversation, delivered in a naturalistic style that conveys both these women’s priorities. . . . Readers get to soak up the cozy atmosphere of this Scottish university town and McCall Smith’s gentle good will. . . . Isabel once again proves herself civilized company for cold winter nights.” —The Boston Globe

“This totally absorbing novel has as its primary focus the grip of the past, as Isabel helps a woman given up for adoption find her biological father. Isabel is everything you’d want in a philosopher, but she is also quirky and witty and made more human by the longing she still sometimes feels for a beautiful but bad love in her past. Far from being Utopian, The Forgotten Affairs of Youth is filled with both spires and spikes, like Edinburgh itself.” —Booklist (starred review)

“You needn’t be a series-long admirer of Isabel Dalhousie  to be beguiled by this curious philosopher and casual sleuth . . . Isabel believes only the examined life is worth living, and fearlessly so . . . It makes [her] a heroine worth following, even through this quiet, more reflective foray.” —Publishers Weekly

“A look inside the hearts and minds of our friends in Edinburgh . . . A real treat.”
—The Cleveland Plain Dealer
 
“The well-trod streets and worn stone walls of an ancient, elegant city are in Isabel’s very DNA. . . . Gentle, humorous, charming—Alexander McCall Smith invariably takes an unvarnished but kindly snapshot of modern society and the result, every time, is entertaining and enchanting reading about characters you think you know—and wish you did.”
—Las Vegas Review Journal

Praise for the Isabel Dalhousie series
“A world where humor is gentle, suffering is acknowledged but not foregrounded, and efforts to do good are usually rewarded. It’s a wonderful place to visit, even if we don’t get to live there.”
—The Washington Post
 
“McCall Smith’s contemporary cozies have proved that crimes need not be punishable by death to provide a satisfying read . . . A genteel, wisdom-filled entertainment.”
—Los Angeles Times
 
“Endearing . . . Offers tantalizing glimpses of Edinburgh’s complex character and a nice, long look into the beautiful mind of a thinking woman.”
—The New York Times Book Review
 
“McCall Smith’s talent for dialogue is matched only by his gift for characterization. It’s hard to believe that he could make up a character as complex and unique as Isabel. She is by turns fearless, vulnerable, headstrong, and insecure, but always delightful.”
 —Chicago Tribune

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307739407
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/2/2012
  • Series: Isabel Dalhousie Series , #8
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 159,274
  • Product dimensions: 5.16 (w) x 7.99 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Meet the Author

Alexander McCall Smith

Alexander McCall Smith is also the author of the beloved bestselling No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series, the Portuguese Irregular Verbs series, the 44 Scotland Street series, and the Corduroy Mansions series. He is also the author of numerous children’s books. He is professor emeritus of medical law at the University of Edinburgh and has served with many national and international organizations concerned with bioethics. He was born in what is now known as Zimbabwe and taught law at the University of Botswana. He lives in Scotland. Visit his website at www.alexandermccallsmith.com.

Biography

Alexander McCall Smith was born in Zimbabwe (then Rhodesia) and went to school in Bulawayo, near the Botswana border. Although he moved to Scotland to attend college and eventually settled in Edinburgh, he always felt drawn to southern Africa and taught law for a while at the University of Botswana. He has written a book on the criminal law of Botswana, and among his successful children's books is a collection of African folk tales, Children of Wax.

Eventually, Smith had an urge to write a novel about a woman who would embody the qualities he admired in the people of Botswana, and the result, The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, was a surprise hit, receiving two special Booker citations and a place on the Times Literary Supplement's International Books of the Year and the Millennium list. "The author's prose has the merits of simplicity, euphony and precision," Anthony Daniels wrote in the Sunday Telegraph. "His descriptions leave one as if standing in the Botswanan landscape. This is art that conceals art. I haven't read anything with such unalloyed pleasure for a long time."

Despite the book's success in the U.K., American publishers were slow to take an interest, and by the time The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency was picked up by Pantheon Books, Smith had already written two sequels. The books went from underground hits to national phenomena in the United States, spawning fan clubs and inspiring celebratory reviews. Smith is also the author of a detective series featuring the insatiably curious philosopher Isabel Dalhousie and the 44 Scotland Street novels, which present a witty portrait of Edinburgh society

In an interview on the publisher's web site, Smith says he thinks the country of Botswana "particularly chimes with many of the values which Americans feel very strongly about -- respect for the rule of law and for individual freedom. I hope that readers will also see in these portrayals of Botswana some of the great traditional virtues in Africa -- in particular, courtesy and a striking natural dignity."

Good To Know

As a professor at Edinburgh Law School, Smith specializes in criminal law and medical law, and has written about the legal and ethical aspects of euthanasia, medical research, and medical practice.

When he isn't writing books or teaching, Smith finds time to play the bassoon in the candidly named amateur ensemble he co-founded, The Really Terrible Orchestra.

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Read an Excerpt

By the time she got back to the house, having been inter­rupted on the way back by bumping into a garrulous neighbour, the morning was already almost over. For Isabel, the watershed was always eleven-thirty; that was the point at which if nothing was achieved, then nothing would be, the point at which one had to think about lunch, now just an hour away.
 
Since Charlie had started going to his playgroup, the morn­ings had become even shorter, as he had to be fetched shortly after noon, and it took ten minutes to get him back and another ten minutes to get him changed out of his morning clothes; by this time, he would be covered in finger paint, crumbs, pieces of a curious modelling substance much approved of by the play­group authorities, grains of sand from the sandpit and, very occasionally, what looked like specks of blood. Boys, it seemed to Isabel, were magnets for dirt and detritus, and the only solu­tion, if one were wanted, was frequent changes of clothing. Or one could throw up one’s hands and allow them to get dirtier through the day and then hose them down—metaphorically, of course—in the early evening.
 
Isabel opted to change Charlie, and so his morning clothes, once abandoned, were replaced with afternoon clothes. She decided that she rather liked the idea of having afternoon clothes, even if one were not a two-year-old. Changing into one’s afternoon clothes could become something of a ritual, rather like changing for dinner—which so few people did any more. And the afternoon clothes themselves could be the sub­ject of deliberation and chosen with care; they would be more loose-fitting than one’s morning clothes, more autumnal in shade, perhaps—clothes that would reflect the lengthening of shadows and sit well with the subtle change in light that comes after three; russet clothes, comfortable linen, loose-fitting col­lars and sleeves.
 
“You thinking?”
 
It was Isabel’s housekeeper, Grace. She had worked in the house when Isabel’s father was still alive, and had been kept on by Isabel. It would have been impossible to ask Grace to leave—even if Isabel had wanted to do so; she came with the house and had naturally assumed that the house could not be run without her. Isabel had felt vaguely apologetic about having a housekeeper—it seemed such an extravagant, privileged thing to do, but a discussion with her friend, Peter Stevenson, had helped.
 
“What good would it do if you were to stop that particular item of expenditure?” Peter said. “All it would mean was that Grace would be out of a job. What would it achieve?”
 
“But I feel embarrassed,” said Isabel. “Somebody of my age doesn’t need a housekeeper. People will think I’m lazy.”
 
Peter was too perceptive to swallow that. “That’s not it, is it? What’s worrying you is that people will think that you’re well-off, which you are. So why not just accept it? You use your money generously—I know that. Carry on like that and forget what you imagine people think about you. It’s not an actual sin to have money. The sin exists in using it selfishly, which you don’t.”
 
“Oh well,” said Isabel.
 
“Exactly.”
 
Now Grace stood in the doorway of Isabel’s workroom, a bucket in hand, on her way to performing the daily chore of washing down the Victorian encaustic-tile floor in the entrance hall. Isabel was not sure that this floor had to be washed every day, but Grace had always done it and would have resisted any suggestion that she change her routine.
 
Now Grace’s question hung in the air. She often asked Isabel whether she was thinking; it was almost an accusation.
 
“I suppose I am thinking. But not about work, I must admit.” Isabel, who was seated at her desk, gave a despairing glance at the piles of paper before her. “I’m afraid that I’ve accomplished very little this morning.”
 
“Me too,” said Grace. “I’ve done none of the ironing yet, I’m afraid. All those shirts of Jamie’s.”
 
“Leave them,” said Isabel. “Jamie can iron them himself. It’s very therapeutic for men to iron. Therapeutic for women, that is.”
 
Grace shook her head. “I’ll do them later this afternoon.” She put down the bucket. “Where does the time go? Do you ever ask yourself that?”
 
“Constantly,” said Isabel. “As most people do.” She smiled. “Mind you, how much of our time, do you think, is spent asking ourselves where the time goes?”
 
Isabel remembered that it was a Friday, which meant that Grace would have spent the previous evening at one of her spiritualist meetings. She enjoyed hearing about these, as Grace was always prepared to give a candid assessment of the visiting medium. The previous week the visiting medium had been from Glasgow and had made contact with spirits who voiced an inter­esting, if somewhat unusual, complaint.
 
“He said that there were a number of spirits trying to get through. He said that that they were all from Glasgow.”
 
Isabel had raised an eyebrow. “Do spirits live in particular places? I thought that the whole point about being disembodied is that you rose above constraints of place. Have I got it wrong?”
 
Grace shook her head. “Spirits often hang about the places that were special to them before they crossed over,” she said. “He said that these spirits wanted to get back to Glasgow because they weren’t happy in Edinburgh.”
 
“A likely story!” snorted Isabel.
 
“My feelings too,” Grace had replied.
 
Now, Isabel asked about the previous evening. Was the medium any good, or at least better than the man who con­tacted the unhappy Glaswegian spirits?
 
“Much better,” said Grace. “He was one of our regulars. We had him about four months ago and he was really good. He saw somebody’s husband—clear as day, he said. I was sitting next to the woman and I comforted her. It was very moving.”
 
Isabel said nothing. The fundamental premises of Grace’s spiritualist meetings might not have withstood rigorous, rational examination, but there was little doubt in her mind about the solace that they gave. And what was wrong with anything that gave comfort to lives bereft of it?
 
“Yes,” Grace continued. “This medium—he’s called Mr. Barr; I don’t know his first name, I’m afraid—he works in a bank. In the back room, I think; he’s not a teller or anything like that. Anyway, he has a real talent for getting through to the other side. You can see it in his eyes; he just has that look to him—you know what I mean?”
 
Isabel did. “The light—”
 
“Exactly,” said Grace. “It’s the light that shines from the eyes. There’s no mistaking it and he had it. It was like .  . .” She searched for an analogy, and then decided, “Like a lighthouse.”
 
Isabel struggled with the image. Lighthouse eyes would pre­sumably send forth beams at intervals, which would create a rather odd impression, she felt, especially at night, and if such people lived by the sea . . .
 
“He said something very interesting,” Grace continued. “He said that he was getting a strong message from somebody who had been a stockbroker in Edinburgh in his lifetime. He was now on the other shore and wanted us to know that everything would be all right.”
 
“That’s reassuring,” said Isabel.
 
“I think he was talking about the country’s economy. He said that we shouldn’t worry—it was going to be all right.”
 
Isabel raised an eyebrow. “I wonder how he knows?”
 
Grace assumed a rather superior expression. “They know,” she said. “We may not understand how they know, but the important thing is that they know. It’s to do with time. Time has a different meaning in the spirit world.”
 
Isabel did not contradict this; she knew there was little point. If asked to justify her claims about the world beyond, Grace tended to shelter behind the idea that there were some forms of knowledge that somebody like Isabel simply could not grasp.
 
“Skepticism closes the mind,” she would say. “Like a trap.”
 
Grace continued with her report. “He became quite specific, you know. He mentioned a particular company that he said would do well. He said that all the conditions were right for this to happen.”
 
Isabel expressed her surprise. “A tip? An investment tip?”
 
“No,” said Grace. “It was not like that at all. The spirit was just sharing something with us. He was obviously happy that this company would do well and he wanted us to share his happiness.”
 
Isabel hesitated for a moment. Grace’s meeting must have been rich in comic possibilities, with the medium issuing what amounted to a stock-market prediction, and some of those attending, perhaps, discreetly writing down the details.
 
“What company?” she asked on impulse.
 
“West of Scotland Turbines,” said Grace. “You’ll see their shares in the paper. Look at the stock-market page.”
 
“So they exist?”
 
“Yes, of course they exist. I looked them up. They make tur­bines for hydroelectric schemes.”
 
Grace appeared to feel that they had spent long enough on turbines and went on to say something about needing new scouring liquid for the upstairs shower, which was becoming mildewed. She looked at Isabel slightly reproachfully, as if she were responsible for the mildew. Isabel thought: It’s not my fault, but Grace will always blame me.
 
Then Grace said, “Oh, somebody phoned while you were out. I asked for her name, but she just left a number for you to call back. It’s in the basket. Some people don’t give their names, which is odd, I think. It’s as if they’ve got something to hide .  . .” She examined Isabel as if she were conniving in, or at least con­doning, a whole series of anonymous calls. Then she continued, “She sounded Australian.”
 
It was the woman whom Cat had met. Isabel glanced at her watch: there was time to return the call before she went off to collect Charlie. That would mean, of course, that she would have done no work at all that morning, and would probably do very little that afternoon. Did it matter? Would the world be changed if the next edition of the Review of Applied Ethics did not come out on time? The answer, of course, was that it would make very little difference—a humbling thought.
 
Isabel rose from her desk and made her way into the kitchen. If Grace wanted to leave her a note, there was a small basket on top of the fridge in which notes were placed. There was one now, with a number scribbled on it in pencil. Under­neath the number, Grace had written: woman. Isabel smiled; she was reminded of her father, who had once said to her, “Don’t write—or say—any more than you have to. Just don’t.”
 
Or think, perhaps?
 
Isabel took the note back to her study. There she wrote on it West of Scotland Turbines, and then picked up the telephone.

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Reading Group Guide

1. Spoiler Alert: Do not read further if you want to discover the plot twists on your own.

Cat and Isabel talk about whether they find their occupations worthwhile. Isabel admits that she wonders about it all the time, and Cat says that she does not.  “I sell cheese and Italian sausages...I don’t have time to think.  Most people don’t.  They do what they have to do because they need to eat” (24).  How does this exchange point to the differences between aunt and niece?  What does it suggest about their approaches to life?

2. Isabel and Jane have an immediate rapport: “Their conversation had started in the deep end, unlike most conversations, which launched themselves into the shallowest of shallows” (38).  What experiences and ideas does Isabel share with Jane, although they have just met?  Do you agree with Isabel’s statement about the need for a spiritual dimension in one’s life (40-41)?

3. Though he often feels that Isabel should stay out of other people’s troubles, Jamie feels strongly that she should help Jane find her father.  Is Jamie becoming more tolerant, or is there something more than usually poignant about Jane’s situation?

4. As they lie in bed, Isabel and Jamie discuss Jane’s situation, and Isabel’s mind wanders, as it often does, on various “odd tangents” (45).  He says to her, “You think these things—these curious things come into your mind—and then you just say them.  I love it.  Listening to you is like reading an amazing book” (56).  Do you enjoy the digressions of Isabel’s thoughts as much as Jamie does?  What does Jamie’s statement tell us about the kind of closeness and affection they share?

5. In her first conversation with Isabel, Catherine Succoth is guarded, though Isabel guesses at once the nature of her relationship with Alastair Rankeillor (93-101).  What is the reason for the different mood of their second conversation?  What experience do the two women share (239)? 

6. As Isabel leaves the hospital after being sickened by eating wild mushrooms, she stops and speaks to a young man who has attempted suicide.  If you were in his position, how would you feel about Isabel’s words with you (118-19)?  Is it intrusive to speak to him, or is it an important act of kindness?

7. Cat’s new employee, Sinclair, is the sort of person Isabel can’t get along with.  What is at the heart of their conflict when they work together in the store (129-135)? What does their interaction, and Isabel’s annoyance with him, tell us about Isabel’s ideals of human behavior?

8. Recalling a conversation with a friend who commented that in a country village people say good morning to strangers, Isabel thinks, “But we are not moral strangers to those we see in the street” (143).  Do you agree with Isabel’s principle of “moral proximity”?  How would life be different if most people thought about moral issues as Isabel does?

9. Visiting Rory Cameron’s village, Isabel passes by some cows poking their head through a gate.  “‘I’m sorry, I have nothing for you,’ she muttered.”  Then she thinks, “It’s come to this at last: I’m talking to cows” (161).  How would you describe Isabel’s sense of humor?  In what kinds of situations do you find comedy in this novel?

10. What is striking about Rory Cameron’s reaction to the news that he is a father?  Why is it important for our understanding of the importance of this revelation that he is described as a disappointed man (170-73), a person “with an air of unhappiness about him” (159)?

11. Do you agree with the way Isabel handles the news that Grace has lost her savings by investing in West of Scotland Turbines (184)?  Is she right in compensating Grace for her loss?  What does Isabel’s remark, “Carry on being who you are,” tell us about the importance of their relationship (185)?

12. Isabel believes that Rory is not Jane’s biological father, and that Alastair Rankeillor probably is.  Catherine Succoth had suggested that Rory was the person Jane was looking for, but she confirms Isabel’s hunch when they meet again and she apologizes for having been misleading (241).  But now that Jane and Rory have struck up such a strong bond, Isabel doesn’t know how to proceed.  What is the right thing for Isabel to do in this situation?

13. In The Careful Use of Compliments, Jamie proposed to Isabel and Isabel suggested that it was better to wait. What happens, or what changes, to convince Isabel that it’s time to marry Jamie?  Why do Isabel and Jamie decide to have a very small wedding?

14. When they next meet, Jane admits that Georgina told her that Rory cannot be her father, because he’s infertile.  Georgina hasn’t told him the truth about why they haven’t had children: “she decided to protect him from the psychological burden of the knowledge of his infertility” (251).  Given that Rory is a sensitive and disappointed man, are Georgina and Jane right in protecting him from the knowledge that Jane isn’t his daughter?

15. Is Jane right in arguing that it’s the happiness gained, and not the authenticity of the relationship, that matters (251-54)?  Why does Isabel then feel uncomfortable about the outcome?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 12 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 5, 2012

    Isabel and Jamie at Their Best!

    As always Isabel and her cadre of characters kept me so happy and engrossed in their affairs. I only wish Alexander McCall Smith could possible write faster. I cannot get enough of this author. Charming, enlightening, and so easy to read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2012

    Highly Recommended - great read!

    This story immediately draws you in as it describes Isabel's life with her child, her fiance, her friends and family. It makes one stop and think about comments, thoughts and assumptions we each make about the people who are a part of our life and those who enter our life unexpectedly. Very enjoyable read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 12, 2013

    I am a big fan of Smith's No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency series,

    I am a big fan of Smith's No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency series, and I had high hopes for this series as well, but it disappoints. By its very nature as a series there will be some repetition from book to book, but Smith expounds, at great length, on the same points in each and every book as if every reader is a new reader. I found myself skipping ahead, a lot, as I had lost patience with Isabel's same old agonizing over Cat's poor choices in men, her vapid fiance's youth and good looks, her gruff housekeeper's interest in the occult, the machinations of Dr. Lettuce, and her supernaturally well behaved toddler's love of savory foods. The subplots in this new installment are somewhat interesting, giving grist for Isabel's philosophizing mill, but not satisfying enough to flesh out a whole book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2012

    Best one yet!

    Isabel deals with the question of what constitutes family.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2012

    Okay

    Not sure if I still am enjoying this series.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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