The Forgotten Founding Father: Noah Webster's Obsession and the Creation of an American Culture

The Forgotten Founding Father: Noah Webster's Obsession and the Creation of an American Culture

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by Joshua Kendall
     
 

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American's own The Professor and the Madman: a story of Noah Webster, author of American English.

Noah Webster's name is now synonymous with the dictionary he created, but his story is not nearly so ubiquitous.

Webster hobnobbed with various Founding Fathers and was a young confidant of George Washington and Ben Franklin. He started America

Overview

American's own The Professor and the Madman: a story of Noah Webster, author of American English.

Noah Webster's name is now synonymous with the dictionary he created, but his story is not nearly so ubiquitous.

Webster hobnobbed with various Founding Fathers and was a young confidant of George Washington and Ben Franklin. He started America's first daily newspaper, predating Alexander Hamilton's New York Post. His "blue-backed speller" for schoolchildren sold millions of copies and influenced early copyright law. But perhaps most important, Webster was an ardent supporter of a unified, definitively American culture, distinct from the British, at a time when the United States of America were anything but unified-and his dictionary of American English is a testament to that.

Editorial Reviews

Noah Webster (1758-1843) is best known, of course, for his breakthrough 1828 American Dictionary of the English Language, but according to author Joshua Kendall (The Man Who Made Lists), lexicography was just one of Webster's claims to fame. In fact, the thesis of his new book is that this proud Connecticut Yankee deserves credit as one of our true Founding Fathers. Kendall doesn't argue that Webster fought on Revolutionary War frontlines or ghost wrote the Declaration of Independence; instead, he maintains that this energetic 18th century polymath helped create a unified, distinctly American culture. A full-bodied view of a great man who had become a footnote.

Publishers Weekly
In 1828 Noah Webster published the groundbreaking American Dictionary of the English Language and secured his niche as an avatar of a distinct American culture. Kendall (The Man Who Made Lists) honors Webster's crucial contributions to early American nationalism, which extended far beyond his primary obsession, the written word. Kendall paints a complex portrait of Webster (1758–1843), a man he claims "housed a host of contradictory identities: revolutionary, reactionary, fighter, peacemaker, intellectual, commonsense philosopher, ladies' man, prig, slick networker and loner." In spite of his flaws, Webster, Kendall argues not wholly successfully, belongs among the ranks of America's notable founders, associating with George Washington and Ben Franklin, among others, to craft an early American identity rooted in national pride and a distinctly American lexicon. Citing frequent references to Webster's nervous afflictions, Kendall ventures the somewhat shaky diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder. The book includes the politics of the "forgotten" founder, for example, noting that Webster "detested Andrew Jackson as the second coming of Jefferson," and a wide range of his activities, including helping found Amherst College. Kendall provides an intriguing look at one of America's earliest men of letters that is sure to appeal to lovers of both words and history. (Apr.)
Library Journal
Kendall (The Man Who Made Lists: Love, Death, Madness, and the Creation of Roget's Thesaurus) provides a compelling chronicle of the foremost name in American lexicography. A part of the celebrated Yale graduating class of 1778 and a lifelong social and political conservative, Noah Webster had a penchant for rubbing people the wrong way as pronounced as his knack for words. His mechanism for coping with recurrent depression, compiling data, would lead to the creation of one of the best-known works in American history. While lacking in pure literary talent, Webster was a master of self-promotion who relentlessly lobbied for extensive copyright laws, a stronger national union, and the creation of a uniquely American identity. VERDICT Though the title of Kendall's work may overplay Webster's political legacy, this is certainly a poignant look into the life of a figure who played a central role in the historical development of the American language. Kendall capably delves beyond the realm of words and into Webster's social and intellectual worlds. Recommended for fans of historical biography and early American cultural history.—Brian Odom, Pelham P.L., AL
Kirkus Reviews

Freelance journalist Kendall (The Man Who Made Lists: Love, Death, Madness, and the Creation of Roget's Thesaurus, 2008) tells the story of the remarkable Noah Webster (1758–1843)—lexicographer, political theorist, journalist, co-founder of Amherst College, polymath.

The author notes that many Americans confuse Webster with his more famous distant cousin Daniel. But Kendall's biography may change that. Born on a farm in Hartford, Conn., Webster attended school only a few months a year but entered Yale in 1774, where he befriended poet Joel Barlow (with whom he fell out, over religion, many decades later). Webster became the friend and acquaintance of many of the luminaries of the American Revolution, George Washington among them, but he struggled to find a career. He tried teaching and the law, struggling in both. However, he wrote fiery pamphlets and newspaper essays and then published his famous spelling book that, off and on, enriched him, frustrated him and propelled him into celebrity. It also occasioned the genesis of the spelling bee. Kendall argues that Webster invented the author tour, a contention that is hard to deny—he traveled all over the country promoting his writing, making deals, pressing flesh, smiling and schmoozing. He was also an early abolitionist. He first found career stability in journalism, editing the Federalist newspaperAmerican Minerva. Just before the turn of the century, he found another love: lexicography. Kendall writes that Webster had a most orderly mind, which sought to categorize and record everything. Though his was not the first American dictionary, it was by far the most thorough and influential. The American Dictionaryappeared in 1828, was a quick success and lives on as Merriam-Webster's (the Merriam family joined the enterprise in 1843).

A gracefully told story that commands attention and confers on Webster deserved honor too long deferred.

Jesse Sheidlower
…Joshua Kendall gives us a lively and insightful biography, the best picture we have of Webster's complex character.
—The New York Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399156991
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
04/14/2011
Pages:
368
Product dimensions:
9.04(w) x 6.22(h) x 1.16(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Joshua Kendall is a language enthusiast and an award-winning freelance journalist whose work has appeared in such publications as The Boston Globe, The Wall Street Journal, and Psychology Today. He lives in Boston.

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The Forgotten Founding Father: Noah Webster's Obsession and the Creation of an American Culture 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
HerbSloan More than 1 year ago
Mr. Kendall has done his homework. This bio is well researched and very well written. Many history books are boringly written and sometimes pointless. The Forgotten Founding Father suffers from neither of these traits. I throughly enjoyed the work and the author makes a good argument that Noah Webster was a major contributor in the founding of this country. I also gained insite into the personalities and the social and economic order of the time. Noah Webster for instance invented the book tour and used it to good advantage. Well done Mr. Kendall.
mdt2 More than 1 year ago
A compelling read. At times I struggled some with this book. It seemed to have a lot of: "On March 30, 1810, Noah did such and such. Then he went to dinner at Mr._____'s home. Then he went home." There was some boring routine. The author obviously investigated his subject thoroughly, but there could have been more variation in the writing. I kept up with it because of the subject. The last one-third to one-half of the book picked up some and kept my interest to the end. I enjoyed learning the subject matter, but think it could have been presented in a more compelling and more readable way. It is strange that we commonly think of Daniel Webster as the dictionary guru, when it was really Noah. Thanks also, Mr. Kendall, I was exposed to 75 new words that I could not define and have to look up and study from my Webster's New Universal Unabridged Dictionary to place in my own personal dictionary I'm creating. Noah Webster lives on and has had a tremendous influence on our culture.  He was truly a great man and left a lasting legacy. A popular biography was warranted. After finishing the book, I'm thinking, Wow.  
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago