Death of the Dragon [NOOK Book]

Overview

Azoun IV, in the twilight of his years, is still a shining hero to most of his subjects, and to all but the eldest, the only king they've ever known. He's led them capably out of dark doom before.

Yet Cormyr has never faced so many mighty and mysterious foes at once. Demonic ghazneths, ancient curses, weird trees of foul magic, goblins and their kin on the rise in the ...
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Death of the Dragon

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Overview

Azoun IV, in the twilight of his years, is still a shining hero to most of his subjects, and to all but the eldest, the only king they've ever known. He's led them capably out of dark doom before.

Yet Cormyr has never faced so many mighty and mysterious foes at once. Demonic ghazneths, ancient curses, weird trees of foul magic, goblins and their kin on the rise in the northern wilderlands, a blight upon the land, rebellious mutterings, dying war wizards...and a dragon the likes of which no living eyes on Faerun have ever seen.

The Purple Throne doesn't seem so unassailable now. It could well shatter under the weight of a gigantic dragon--or the secrets and follies of the last of the Obarskyrs.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786962099
  • Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
  • Publication date: 1/17/2012
  • Series: Cormyr Saga
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 199,004
  • File size: 3 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2000

    Well done Ed & Troy!!!

    This is a well written story by authors Ed Greenwood and Troy Denning. As the third installment of stories beginning with 'Cormyr: A novel' and 'Beyond the High Road' this book takes us through the long expected end of the reign of the Forgotten Realms longest and most stable monarchy. That's not really a spoiler since it is implied in the synopsis above and on the cover (as well as fan mailing lists for the last 9 months). In the FR shared world time goes on, people die, and governments change, which is to be expected. It's the fact that the FR setting changes with time that makes it so great - as long as the changes are within reason and don't force us out of our willing suspension of disbelief. The writing of Greenwood and Denning is excellent, and the difficulty of author's working together on a story is transparent, the storyline nearly seamless. Even longtime fans of both writers will be hard pressed at times to tell which author wrote what portion. Either Ed & Troy work well together or the editor is to be commended - probably both. Action, dialogue and the story itself are well constructed. A kingdom at war with a giant dragon (book cover) and other beasties has to have lots of action to it and for fans this story has plenty. War IS hell, and the writing takes you through both the hack & slash attitude common in this genre as well as the gripping reality of war in all it's horrible consequences. It's not gory in the descriptiveness though, so if you can handle watching ER you're more than prepared for this book. This is one of the great features of these authors in that they can show the horror of combat without resorting to the common day 'fill it with gore and it will sell' phenomenon. Oh, it has that, but it is well done and is not overmuch. Action alone is often not enough and this story both fills the reader with pride at the marching armies and tugs at heartstrings during some very well written emotional moments. The story itself is compelling (you'll not want to put the book down until you're finished). At certain portions in the story, if you don't find yourself welling up with emotion or wiping your eyes, you're a hard heart indeed. Very few FR novels can have this said of them, and by far this story makes it one of the best (if not THE best) stories to be born from this setting created by author Greenwood. *Helpful Hints* 'Cormyr: A Novel' is not a required read, but a recommended one. The historical details of this book do come into play in the third volume. They are well explained n 'Death of the Dragon' but the details are in the first book and definitely round out the story as a whole. 'Beyond the High Road' is almost an absolute requirement. Without having read this book you'll have little understanding of what Alaundo's prophecy is (See back cover of Death of the Dragon); who and what the creatures mentioned are; and the 'why' of it all. You'll also need this book to be able to identify many of the characters & their place in the grand scheme of things. It *is* possible to read 'Death of the Dragon' as a stand alone book, but without at least book II of the series the reader will be full of questions at the end as well as be confused throughout most of the book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2012

    Gomer is the slayer NOT Bob DAbek

    You lose, admit it! Psychopaths play games 30 + years old. Little boys hate to let go of toys! All that money in D&D books, wow thats cool! Most grow up really go out and buy school books. A R Dabeck you are the only person on the planet with 3000 D&D books (all the same copy) good luck at UCSB!

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2000

    Blood and Gore and Guts...Oh My!

    I have never much liked Ed Greenwood's Forgotten Realms books. Everyone hurls magic around like it is as common as water, and most of his titles are excuses to glorify his D&D character, Elminster. Troy Denning has never been a big favorite of mine, either, but some of his books have been all right. I liked 'Beyond the High Road,' the previous title in the Cormyr series more than I thought I might. Therefore I came to read 'Death of the Dragon' not quite knowing what to expect. What I found was 375 pages of battle scenes. If it isn't goblins, it's orcs. If it isn't either of those, you get to see the Cormyreans trying to kill one of those ghazneth things. Or a dragon. Or something else. If you are looking for pure, brutal, hack and slash reading, this book is great! If you want any more to the story, don't look for it here; it isn't there! It is not a bad 'empty' read for just the heck of it, but 'Death of the Dragon' isn't going to win any awards, either.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2010

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