Forgotten Realms: Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad (Avatar #5) [NOOK Book]

Overview

This title is the final in a series of recovers of the popular Avatar series. At the time of its original release, this series presented key events that impacted the entire Forgotten Realms world, and the effects of those events are still felt in current novels. This re-released series features a cohesive ...
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Forgotten Realms: Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad (Avatar #5)

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Overview

This title is the final in a series of recovers of the popular Avatar series. At the time of its original release, this series presented key events that impacted the entire Forgotten Realms world, and the effects of those events are still felt in current novels. This re-released series features a cohesive cover design and all-new art and was written by New York Times best-selling author Troy Denning.

Cyric the Mad

Who betrayed his friends Midnight and Kelemvor and sought to destroy them.

Who ascended to godhood and now spreads his lies and intrigues into every corner of Faerun.

Who is the Lord of Murder, the Prince of Lies--and insane.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786962037
  • Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
  • Publication date: 1/10/2012
  • Series: Forgotten Realms Avatar Series , #5
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 125,986
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Troy Denning
Troy Denning

Troy Denning is the New York Times bestselling author of Star Wars: Fate of the Jedi: Abyss; Star Wars: Tatooine Ghost; Star Wars: The New Jedi Order: Star by Star; the Star Wars: Dark Nest trilogy: The Joiner King, The Unseen Queen, and The Swarm War; and Star Wars: Legacy of the Force: Tempest, Inferno, and Invincible—as well as Pages of Pain, Beyond the High Road, The Summoning, and many other novels.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

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4 Star

(3)

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 16, 2013

    I'm only giving this four stars because my favorite God in the R

    I'm only giving this four stars because my favorite God in the Realms is focused on: Cyric! I LOATHE the way Denning portrays him, however. He makes Cyric act like a typical cartoon villain...at least until the end, when he finally seems to GET Cyric. Turns out...well, I won't spoil it, but let's just say Cyric really IS the smartest of all the gods, even Oghma, god of knowledge. I also liked Malik, the funny Cyricist that gets into so much trouble its only because of Tyr's magic that he even lives on to the end. Cyric was also brilliant once again when he made Malik his own personal 'seraph', also known as a demigod. He's the Seraph of Lies, but CAN'T LIE EVER! Cyric realizes that the best truth is a Cassandra truth. One people won't believe even though it is true. This is EXTREMELY beneficial in the Shadovar series.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2006

    Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad

    Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad is an action-packed fantasy novel by Troy Denning. It is the fifth and final book in The Avatar Series, based in the Forgotten Realms setting. The main character and narrator of the story is Malik el Sami yn Nasser. Malik is an anti-hero he performs valiant feats in the name of the evil god Cyric. Malik does have morals, but he puts them aside to better serve Cyric. He believes Cyric to be the One True God and serves him to the best of his abilities, even though Cyric is the god of strife, intrigue, deceit, and madness. Malik is a pudgy little man with bulging eyes and a facetious sense of humor. He is a wealthy merchant from the great city of Calimport and is much favored of the Caliph and of Cyric himself. Malik left his wealth and his wife behind with the first prince of Calimshan in search of the Cyrinishad, the holy book of Cyric which has the power to convert any who read its pages of falsity to the cause of Cyric the book had been stolen years before by those who wished to prevent such a thing from happening. During the course of his journey, Malik is visited by Cyric numerous times and learns of his god¿s madness¿a madness created when Cyric had read the Cyrinishad in the past and believed his own lies. Even worse is that Cyric will be put on trial in a tenday by his fellow gods for his supposed incompetence of upholding his divine duties. The main conflict arises when Malik decides to obtain the True Life of Cyric, a factual biography of Cyric detailing his life as a mortal and written to counterbalance the effects of the Cyrinishad, and plans to somehow get Cyric to read it before his trial in order to cure his madness. As Cyric actually wants Malik to recover the Cyrinishad, Malik must hide the truth from his deity for his own good¿a difficult task indeed! He must also do this while being hounded by a powerful witch bent on delivering justice. Troy Denning pens the action sequences in Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad in exquisite detail and beautiful prose. Time slows during such events. Malik also acquires a diary where he learns about the True Life of Cyric. A few diary entries are displayed in this novel, and they provide significant background information regarding the story. The point of view is very important in this book. Most of it is in the first person, told from Malik¿s point of view. It provides a good look into the mind of a Cyricist, including all of Malik¿s personal biases and witty expressions that he picked up during his life. Although it is not a masterpiece, Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad is still a good and entertaining novel. Having read the four previous books in the series is not crucial to understanding the story, but it does help a little.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2001

    Pretty good read

    Pretty good read, gets much better as the story goes along. At first, the writing lanquishes a bit as the narrator is from a first person view, but after about the 3rd chapter is starts to die away into a more regular writing. -that is, the author stops using the 'I' word so much. Anyway, the chapters are short so it doesn't take long. By the end of the book I was looking foward to the ending. Which is very well written. The writer does a fantastic job of both humanizing the gods, while portraying thier awesome power. Not an easy feat for any writer.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2014

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