Form Miming Meaning

Overview

The recent past has seen an increasing interest in iconicity especially among linguists. This collection puts the interdisciplinary study of iconic dimensions (comprising what has been termed ‘imagic iconicity’, as well as ‘diagrammatic iconicity’, i.e. iconicity of a more abstract and less semiotic type) on the map, paying special attention to the use of iconicity in literary texts. The studies presented here explore iconicity from two different angles. A first group of authors brings into focus how far the ...
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Overview

The recent past has seen an increasing interest in iconicity especially among linguists. This collection puts the interdisciplinary study of iconic dimensions (comprising what has been termed ‘imagic iconicity’, as well as ‘diagrammatic iconicity’, i.e. iconicity of a more abstract and less semiotic type) on the map, paying special attention to the use of iconicity in literary texts. The studies presented here explore iconicity from two different angles. A first group of authors brings into focus how far the primary code, the code of grammar is influenced by iconic motivation (with contributions on rules involved in discourse; rules in word formation; and phonological rules), and how originally iconic models have become conventionalized. Others go one step further in exploring how, for instance, the presence of iconicity can tell us more about the structure of human cognition, or how the “iconicist desire for symmetry” can be related to the symmetry of the human body. A second group of contributors is more interested in the presence of iconicity as part of the secondary code, i.e. in how speakers and writers remotivate or play with the primary code; how they concretise what has become conventional or how they use form to add to meaning in literary texts, commercial language and in the new electronic use of texts.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Presents selected papers from a March 1997 symposium held in Zurich, in sections on general topics, sound and rhythm, typography and graphic design, word-formation, and syntax and discourse. Studies explore iconicity from two different angles. A first group of scholars is especially interested in how far the primary code, the code of grammar, is influenced by iconic motivation and how originally iconic models have become conventionalized. A second group of contributors is more interested in the presence of iconicity as part of the secondary code. Specific subjects include imagination by ideophones, the visual poetry of e. e. cummings, and iconic use of syntax in fiction. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgements
List of contributors
Introduction: Iconicity as a Creative Force in Language Use
Why Iconicity? 3
Action, Speech, and Grammar: The Sublimation Trajectory 37
Creating the World in Our Image: A New Theory of Love of Symmetry and Iconicist Desire 59
On Semiotic Interplay: Forms of Creative Interaction Between Iconicity and Indexicality in Twentieth-Century Literature 83
Iconicity in Literature: Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Prose Writing 109
What, if Anything, is Phonological Iconicity? 123
Imagination by Ideophones 135
Iconicity and Beyond in "Lullaby for Jumbo": Semiotic Functions of Poetic Rhythm 155
Alphabetic Letters as Icons in Literary Texts 173
'singing is silence': Being and Nothing in the Visual Poetry of E. E. Cummings 199
Iconicity and Divine Likeness: George Herbert's "Coloss. 3.3" 215
Iconic Rendering of Motion and Process in the Poetry of William Carlos Williams 235
Graphological Iconicity in Print Advertising: A Typology 251
Iconicity in the Digital World: An Opportunity to Create a Personal Image? 285
Diagrammatic Iconicity in Word-Formation 307
Iconicity in Brand Names 325
On the Role Played by Iconicity in Grammaticalisation Processes 345
Iconicity, Typology and Cognition 375
The Iconic Use of Syntax in British and American Fiction 393
Linguistic Expression of Perceptual Relationships: Iconicity as a Principle of Text Organization (A Case Study) 409
Author index 423
Subject index 433
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